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Stories Of Wartime, Transformed Through Music (Rahim Alhaj) 0 E. Mee Heard on “All Things Considered” Anastasia Tsioulcas — “Rahim Alhaj is a composer and musician from Baghdad. He was repeatedly imprisoned and tortured for speaking out under Saddam Hussein's regime. Alhaj fled his native country in 1991 — first going to Jordan, then Syria. He says that he heard that the Iraqi secret police intended to murder him abroad. So finally, in 2000, he came to the United States as a refugee, where he was resettled in New Mexico. (It wasn't an easy transition: As a new arrival, he tried to decline a job at a local McDonald's, saying that his music wasn't really right for playing in restaurants.) In 2008, Alhaj became a U.S. citizen, and by 2015, he was given this country's highest prize for traditional and folk artists, the National Heritage Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts. But Alhaj has never left his culture — and music — behind. .…” To continue reading, visit the full article on NPR’s website. Tsioulcas, Anastasia. “Stories Of Wartime, Transformed Through Music.” NPR (July 10, 2018). <https://www.npr.org/2018/07/10/617883155/stories-of-wartime-transformed-through-music>.
by E. Mee
Thursday, July 12, 2018
Trump’s Nativism Is Transforming the Physical Landscape 0 E. Mee Jedediah Purdy — “In his late may commencement address at the Naval Academy, President Trump chose to remind the graduating midshipmen and their families of a particular aspect of American history. ‘Our ancestors conquered a continent,’ he said. This point is part of a larger attack on ‘cynics and critics’ who ‘denigrate America’s incredible heritage.’ Like many of Trump’s actions as president, the speech was a reminder that his particular brand of nationalism takes a keen interest in the meaning of the American land. Even among its other scandals, the Trump administration has drawn attention for its anti-environmental initiatives: withdrawing from the Paris Climate Agreement, ending the Clean Power Plan, and pressing for more drilling offshore and on public land, among many others. These policies cater to the administration’s economic constituencies, to be sure. But they are also about how Trumpian nationalism lays claim to American nature. Nature comes from the Latin root for birth, as in natal, the common origin of everyone. It shares that root with native, as in native land—where a person was born—and so it’s also aligned with nativism, the doctrine that ties political identity and membership to someone’s land of birth, and with nationalism, the myth that defines a people by their birth from a certain land. For centuries this myth has claimed blood and soil as identity, sovereignty, and passport. Trump’s nationalism, too, is bound up in American landscapes, in fights over what makes this place precious and who really belongs here. .…” To continue reading, visit the full article on The Atlantic’s website. Purdy, Jedediah. “Trump’s Nativism Is Transforming the Physical Landscape.” The Atlantic (July 3, 2018). <https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2018/07/trumpian-nativism-is-transforming-the-american-landscape/564026/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=atlantic-weekly-newsletter&utm_content=20180706&silverid-ref=MzEwMTkwMjU0MzA1S0>.
by E. Mee
Tuesday, July 10, 2018
The Fairytale Language of the Brothers Grimm 0 R. Rini Larson Chi Luu — “There once were two brothers from Hanau whose family had fallen on hard times. Their father had died, leaving a wife and six children utterly penniless. Their poverty was so great that the family was reduced to eating but once a day. So it was determined that the brothers must go out into the world to seek their fortune. They soon found their way to the university in Marburg to study law, but there they could not find luck from any quarter. Though they had been the sons of a state magistrate, it was the sons of the nobility that received state aid and stipends. The poor brothers met countless humiliations and obstacles scraping by an education, far from home. Around this time, after Jacob had to abandon his studies to support his family, the entire German kingdom of Westphalia became part of the French Empire under Napoleon Bonaparte’s conquering rule. Finding refuge in the library, the brothers spent many hours studying and searching for stories, poems, and songs that told tales of the people they had left behind. Against the rumblings of war and political upheaval, somehow the nostalgia of stories from an earlier time, of people’s lives and language, in the little villages and towns, in the fields and forest, seemed more important than ever. …” To read the full article, visit Jstor Daily. Luu Chi. “The Fairytale Language of the Brothers Grimm.” Jstor Daily (May 2, 2018). <https://daily.jstor.org/the-fairytale-language-of-the-brothers-grimm/>  
by R. Rini Larson
Tuesday, July 3, 2018
CWCT Announces 2018–2019 Heritage Arts Apprenticeship Program Participants 0 E. Mee The Center for Washington Cultural Traditions (CWCT) has announced the 2018–2019 participants in their inaugural Washington State Heritage Arts Apprenticeship Program.  This program was made possible through the support of the NEA, NEH, and the Washington State legislature. The ten pairs of masters and apprentices will begin their program year in July.  For more information on the participants and the Heritage Arts Apprenticeship Program, visit the Center for Washington Cultural Traditions' website. 
by E. Mee
Friday, June 29, 2018
Quilts of 19th-Century British Soldiers Are Threaded With Mystery 0 E. Mee Natasha Frost — “There are almost as many myths about 19th-century military quilts as there are mysteries. These intricate patchwork textiles were once believed to be the work of recovering soldiers, painstakingly stitched in some far-off corner of the British Empire. The fabric came from the uniforms of fallen comrades—a way to remember those who had given their lives for queen and for country—and the skills from occupational therapy in a clean, well-maintained hospital. They were known as ‘convalescence quilts,’ and they offered reassuring proof to the folks at home that Queen Victoria’s army were being well looked after. Or, at least, so the story went. But many things about this tale are worthy of further investigation, says Annette Gero, an international quilt historian, author, and collector. We don’t know who precisely made these quilts, beyond that they were soldiers; why they made them; what they were used for; or how they picked up the ability to do so. The more scholars like Gero look into these quilts, the more unconvincing the accepted explanations seem. .…” To continue reading, visit the full article on Atlas Obscura’s website. Frost, Natasha. “The Dazzling Quilts of 19th-Century British Soldiers Are Threaded With Mystery.” Atlas Obscura (June 19, 2018). <https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/soldiers-military-quilts-crimea?utm_source=Atlas+Obscura+Daily+Newsletter&utm_campaign=20448bc743-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2018_06_21&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_f36db9c480-20448bc743-66399901&ct=t(EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_6_21_2018)&mc_cid=20448bc743&mc_eid=2f47b1a004>
by E. Mee
Tuesday, June 26, 2018
Water Sprites, Fairies and Elves, Photographer Bego Antón Explores Iceland 0 E. Mee Kerri MacDonald — “Bego Antón can’t see elves. But that doesn’t mean she didn’t try to photograph them. ‘My work is always kind of weird, you know?’ the Spanish photographer admitted. ‘For me it’s a reality, but depending on who sees the story, it’s more of a fantasy.’ The last time Lens spoke with Ms. Antón, the conversation was about dancing dogs. Her latest project, ‘The earth is only a little dust under our feet,’ is the result of five years spent traveling back and forth to Iceland to explore the world of mythical, folkloric creatures. ‘There are elves in Iceland,’ Ms. Antón wrote in her book’s introduction. ‘Also fairies, unicorns, huldufolk, trolls, beach dwarfs, water sprites, mountain spirits and ghosts.’ Ms. Antón, 35, started chasing these sprites during an artist’s residency in Iceland in 2013, when her research led her to a website for an elf school in Reykjavik. ‘I was like, ‘Really? Elf School?’ ‘I talked to the people in the village where I was staying and I realized how close they are to these invisible beings,” she said. “It’s not that they believe in them, but they can see them and talk to them and they relate to them as if they were people, neighbors.’ .…” To continue reading, visit the full article on The New York Times’s website. MacDonald, Kerri. “Water Sprites, Fairies and Elves, Oh My.” New York Times (June 7, 2018). <https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/07/lens/iceland-fairy-folktales-elves-photography.html>
by E. Mee
Tuesday, June 26, 2018
José Feliciano to Sing Star-Spangled Banner, Donate Guitar to Smithsonian 0 E. Mee   Judy Cantor-Navas — “José Feliciano will sing the national anthem at a naturalization ceremony for 20 new U.S. citizens which will take place at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History on June 14, Flag Day. At the ceremony, Feliciano will gift his bespoke Concerto Candelas guitar, that he played during the recording of his breakout hit ‘Light My Fire,’ to the Smithsonian, along with other items from his personal archives. The artist is celebrating 50 years since the release of his Grammy-winning cover of the song by The Doors, which took him to No. 3 on Billboard’s Hot 100 chart. The track appeared on Feliciano!, the enduring album of Latin-tinged covers which peaked at No. 2 on the Billboard 200 albums chart upon its release. That success resulted in an invitation for the Puerto-Rican singer-songwriter to perform ‘The Star-Spangled Banner’ during game five of the 1968 World Series at Detroit’s Tiger Stadium. .…” To continue reading, visit the full article on Billboard’s website. Cantor-Navas, Judy. “José Feliciano to Sing 'Star-Spangled Banner,' Donate Guitar at Smithsonian Citizenship Ceremony: Exclusive.” Billboard (June 6, 2018). <https://www.billboard.com/articles/columns/latin/8459567/jose-feliciano-sing-star-spangled-banner-donate-guitar-smithsonian-citizenship-ceremony>
by E. Mee
Tuesday, June 26, 2018
Why We Don’t Read, Revisited 0 E. Mee Caleb Crain — “A little more than a decade ago, I wrote an article for The New Yorker about American reading habits, which a number of studies then indicated might be in decline. I was worried about what a shift to “secondary orality”—a sociological term for a post-literate culture—might do to America’s politics. “In a culture of secondary orality, we may be less likely to spend time with ideas we disagree with,” I wrote. I suspected that people might become less inclined to do fact checking on their own; “forced to choose between conflicting stories,” they would “fall back on hunches.” I’ll go out on a limb and say that I don’t think that I got this part wrong. But I’ve often wondered whether I was right about the underlying trend, too. Were Americans in fact reading less back then? And are they reading even less today? Whenever I happen across a news article on the topic, I wonder if I’m about to find out whether I was Cassandra or Chicken Little. In assessing reports about reading habits, I keep in mind a couple of lessons from the research that I did a decade ago. First, although American adults seem to get a kick out of worrying about whether American children are reading enough, this is an enormous waste of time in the world in which we happen to live. Children who have any hope of getting into or remaining in the middle class are under great social and economic pressure to excel at academics, and, of all Americans, they are perhaps the least likely to change their reading habits of their own volition. Even the amount of pleasure reading they do seems likely to reflect the social pressure they’re under—not where America in general is headed. .…” To continue reading, visit the full article on The New Yorker’s website. Crain, Caleb. “Why We Don’t Read, Revisited.” The New Yorker (June 14, 2018). <https://www.newyorker.com/culture/cultural-comment/why-we-dont-read-revisited>
by E. Mee
Tuesday, June 26, 2018
Meet Willie Durisseau, the 100-year-old Purveyor of Creole Fiddle Playing 0 E. Mee Ben Myers — “Willie Durisseau apologized for the hoarseness in his voice that made it difficult to speak. Irma Durisseau, his wife of 75 years, fielded most of the visitors’ questions in their Opelousas home last week. 'We met at a dance,' Irma explained. 'Country dancing, a long time ago.' The half-hour conversation was far too short, as any would be that’s meant to cover the life of a 100-year-old black man from south Louisiana who raised 14 kids, served in the U.S. Army in Okinawa and possesses a skill that would be protected behind museum glass if it were an object Durisseau is one of the few remaining Creole fiddle players, and almost certainly the oldest, who learned to play when the style was popular. He lived in obscurity for most of his life until Herman Fuselier wrote about him this month in a column for the Lafayette Daily Advertiser. Now there’s a movement within the Acadiana music community to honor Durisseau in some fashion, although the organizers have not yet decided exactly how. They regard Durisseau as a prophet, and speak of transcendence when describing their meetings with him. .…” To continue reading, visit the full article on The Acadiana Advocate’s website. Myers, Ben. “Meet Willie Durisseau, the 100-year-old Purveyor of Creole Fiddle Playing Who's Inspired a New Contest.” The Acadiana Advocate (June 17, 2018). <http://www.theadvocate.com/acadiana/news/article_898dd8e8-70c7-11e8-904e-93f8e17cb785.html >
by E. Mee
Tuesday, June 26, 2018
Posters, Banners, Boarding Passes: Museums Try to Get a Head Start on... 0 R. Rini Larson By Alex Marshall — “The day after Ireland’s recent abortion referendum, Brenda Malone woke up early, walked to her car and took a stepladder and some wire cutters out of the trunk. Then she started climbing up lampposts and cutting down any campaign posters she could find. The first one had a picture of a fetus on it, with the words ‘Don’t repeal me.’ Ms. Malone may have looked like an activist claiming mementos of the referendum or a protester making a final act of defiance after Ireland’s vote to rescind the Constitution’s ban on abortion. But Ms. Malone had different reasons: She is a curator at the National Museum of Ireland who is working to preserve the posters. Since that day, Ms. Malone has put out a call for flags, banners and signs used in the campaign — she received her first item last week, and is in discussions for around 25 more. She also successfully asked  for airline boarding passes from women who flew back to Ireland for the vote. She asked friends via Facebook, too — but advised them not to climb any lampposts. Other Irish museums have made similar requests. The National Gallery said on Twitter it was interested in collecting 'anything with artistic intent and merit' tied to the referendum. Dublin City Council Library tweeted that it was looking for 'ephemera.' Those calls are just the latest examples of 'rapid response collecting,' a practice that is increasingly being adopted by museums in Europe and America. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on The New York Times' website. Marshall, Alex. “Posters, Banners, Boarding Passes: Museums Try to Get a Head Start on History.” The New York Times (June 18, 2018). <https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/18/arts/design/rapid-response-collecting-ireland-berlin.html>
by R. Rini Larson
Friday, June 22, 2018
This Map Shows the U.S. Really Has 11 Separate “Nations” 0 R. Rini Larson By Mark Abadi —  "The United States comprises several different regions, each with its own rich history and cultural identity. Exactly where those regions start and end has been a long-running debate, but according to author Colin Woodard, the United States can be divided into 11 distinct sub-nations. Woodard mapped out the regions in his 2012 book "American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America." Some of his regions might sound familiar, like the "Deep South"; others might surprise American readers, like his "Midlands" region that stretches from New Jersey to northeastern New Mexico. Recognizing the distinct values of each region is critical to understanding the United States, Woodard said. "The country has been arguing about a lot of fundamental things lately, including state roles and individual liberty," Woodard, a Maine native, told Business Insider in 2015. ..." To continue reading, visit the full article on the Business Insider website. Abadi, Mark. "This Map Shows the U.S. Really Has 11 Separate “Nations” with Entirely Different Cultures." Business Insider (June 18, 2018). <https://amp.businessinsider.com/regional-differences-united-states-2018-1>
by R. Rini Larson
Friday, June 22, 2018
Greg Sharrow Fund 0 R. Rini Larson In April, the folklore world lost Greg Sharrow: educator, documentarian, and longtime staff at the Vermont Folklife Center. "Above all else Greg was an educator," the VFC memoriam page states, "[who] developed and continually refined an innovative approach that put VFC's tools and skills into the hands of teachers and their students so that they could conduct rich research projects in their home communities." This project continues today as the Discovering Community Education Program. The Vermont Folklife Center has established a Greg Sharrow Fund in honor of Sharrow's work. Donations to that fund help to support the Discovering Community Education Program. If you are interested in giving, you may mail a check, payable to the Vermont Folklife Center: 88 Main St. Middlebury, VT 05753 Send it to the attention of John Barstow. Simply write "Greg Sharrow Fund" on the check's memo line, and your gift will go to the fund.    For more information, you may contact Mary Rizos, the education director: mrizos@vermontfolklifesociety.org. Please see the VFC's In Memoriam page for Greg Sharrow, or the VFC page about Greg’s legacy.
by R. Rini Larson
Friday, June 22, 2018
The Surprising History of Old-Timey Swahili Postcards 0 R. Rini Larson By Melody Schrieber — “The photos are mostly of women, decked in elaborate clothing and jewelry, wearing serious or playful or romantic expressions. Many of the images have been colorized — hand-painted to bring ruby lips, golden pendants, emerald chairs to life. These portraits were captured in photography studios throughout Kenya, Tanzania and Somalia from the 1890s to the 1920s. The images offer glimpses into the subjects' lives — and have an unusual history. Unbeknownst to the subjects, photographers often turned the negatives from private shoots into postcards for Westerners to sell or send back home as mementos from their East African trips. Now, these historic postcards are being viewed once more as part of a new exhibition at the Smithsonian's National Museum of African Art in Washington, D.C. World on the Horizon: Swahili Arts Across the Indian Ocean showcases 160 objects from museums and private collections on four continents, displaying art and history from the region known as the Swahili coast in East Africa. The exhibition runs until September 3. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on NPR.com. Schrieber, Melody. “The Surprising History of Old-Timey Swahili Postcards.” NPR (June 10, 2018). <https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2018/06/10/614361414/the-surprising-history-of-old-timey-swahili-postcards>
by R. Rini Larson
Friday, June 22, 2018
Chasing the Pearl of Lao Tzu 0 R. Rini Larson Michael Lapointe — “Legend says the diver drowned retrieving the pearl. Trapped in a giant Tridacna clam, his body was brought to the surface by his fellow tribesmen in Palawan, a province of the Philippines, in May 1934. When the clam was pried open, and the meat scraped out, the local chief beheld something marvelous: a massive pearl, its sheen like satin. In its surface, the chief discerned the face of the Prophet Muhammad. He named it the Pearl of Allah. At 14 pounds, one ounce, it was the largest pearl ever discovered. A Filipino American, Wilburn Dowell Cobb, was visiting the island at the time and offered to buy the jewel. In a 1939 article that appeared in Natural History magazine, he recounted the chief’s refusal to sell: “A pearl with the image of Mohammed, the Prophet of Allah, is earned by devotion, by sacrifice, not bought with money.” But when the chief’s son fell ill with malaria, Cobb used atabrine, a modern medicine, to heal him. “You have earned your reward,” the chief proclaimed. “Here, my friend, claim this, your pearl.” In 1939, Cobb brought the pearl to New York City, and exhibited it at Ripley’s Believe It or Not, on Broadway. There, a new legend emerged, eclipsing the first. Upon seeing the pearl, Cobb said, an elderly Chinese gentleman “of highest culture and significant wealth” named Mr. Lee “burst into an hysteria of trembling and weeping.” This wasn’t the Pearl of Allah; this was the long-lost Pearl of Lao Tzu. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on The Atlantic’s website. Lapointe, Michael. “Chasing the Pearl of Lao Tzu.” The Atlantic (June 2018). <https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2018/06/the-pearl-of-lao-tzu/559109/>
by R. Rini Larson
Tuesday, June 5, 2018
The Increasingly Intricate Story of How the Americas Were Peopled 0 R. Rini Larson Ed Yong — “Tens of thousands of years ago, the places that have since been named Russia and Alaska were not separated by water, but connected by a continuous bridge of land. People walked across that land, heading eastward from Asia. For a time, their journey was blocked by two gigantic ice sheets that smothered most of what is now Canada. But once the ice started melting, those early pioneers—the ancestors of today’s Native Americans—spread southward. Sometime between 14,600 and 17,500 years ago, they split into two main lineages: a northern group and a southern one. The northern group gave rise to the Algonquian-, Na-Dené-, Salishan-, and Tsimshian-speaking peoples of Canada, and to the Ancient One—a famous 8,500-year-old skeleton found in Kennewick, Washington. The southern group included the ancestors of modern Central and South Americans, as well as Anzick-1—a 12,600 year old infant skeleton from the widespread Clovis culture. This narrative comes from archaeology, linguistics, and most recently, genetics. By studying and comparing the DNA of the Ancient One, Anzick-1, and two infants from Upward Sun River in Alaska, scientists have started to piece together the movements—and existence—of ancient peoples. “There have been a lot of interesting ancient DNA findings in the Americas, but always based on one or two genomes,” says Christiana “Freddi” Scheib, from the University of Tartu. “I wanted to see if we could fill out this picture by getting as many ancient genomes as we could.” Scheib and her colleagues ultimately analyzed DNA from the remains of 91 people, who lived in California’s Channel Islands and southwestern Ontario, between 200 and 4,800 years ago. And their study both confirms and complicates the existing story of how the Americas were peopled. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on The Atlantic's website. Yong, Ed. “The Increasingly Intricate Story of How the Americas Were Peopled.” The Atlantic (May 31, 2018). <https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2018/05/the-increasingly-intricate-story-of-how-the-americas-were-peopled/561638/>
by R. Rini Larson
Tuesday, June 5, 2018
Island Folklorists Receive Prestigious Marius Barbeau Medal 0 R. Rini Larson “Georges Arsenault and John Cousins, two of Prince Edward Island’s most esteemed folklorists, will receive a special honour this week. They will be presented with the Marius Barbeau Medal by the Folklore Studies Association of Canada/L’Association canadienne d’ethnologie et de folklore. The medal is given in recognition of remarkable individual contributions to folklore and ethnology through teaching, research, and communication―activities in which both Arsenault and Cousins have excelled. Previous recipients of the Barbeau Medal with fieldwork links to P.E.I. include John Shaw and the late Edward ‘Sandy’ Ives. From May 25–27, the association will be holding its annual meeting at UPEI in collaboration with the Institute of Island Studies. This year’s theme, “Carried on the Waves: Contemporary Currents in Folklore and Ethnology / Porté par les Vagues: Courants Actuels d’Ethnologie et de Folklore,” inspires researchers to explore the flow of expression among various groups over time and place. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on The Guardian’s website. “Island Folklorists Receive Prestigious Marius Barbeau Medal.” The Guardian (May 25, 2018). <http://www.theguardian.pe.ca/community/island-folklorists-receive-prestigious-marius-barbeau-medal-213078/#.WwivZv3jzEw.facebook>
by R. Rini Larson
Monday, June 4, 2018
The Bizarre Lies Mothers Tell Their Kids: ‘Crying Makes Your Head Fall Off' 0 R. Rini Larson By Eric Grundhauser — “Being a mom is a tough job, in large part because you just can’t reason with small children. What you can do, however, is lie to them. In honor of Mother’s Day, we asked readers to send us the most outlandish white lies their mothers ever told them. As it turns out, moms all over the world are telling some wonderfully inventive lies. We received over 500 responses, and as uniquely crazy as many of them were, there was also plenty of common ground. Many mothers still tell variations on the classics: if you make a funny face, it will stay that way; if you eat before you swim, you’ll get cramps (or die); moms have eyes in the backs of their heads, and so on. But then there were the more esoteric fibs, such as the dangers of dragonflies sewing your lips together, that playing in puddles will give you polio, or that a little man lives in your eyes and signals your mom when you aren’t telling the truth. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on The Guardian’s website. Grundhauser, Eric. “The Bizarre Lies Mothers Tell Their Kids: ‘Crying Makes Your Head Fall Off.’” The Guardian (June 1, 2018). <https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2018/jun/01/bizzare-lies-moms-told-kids?>
by R. Rini Larson
Monday, June 4, 2018
A Wolflike Creature Was Stalking Livestock in Montana 0 R. Rini Larson By Cleve R. Wootson Jr. —  "In Montana, it’s legal to shoot wolves that get perilously close to people or livestock, and that’s exactly what a rancher in Denton thought he did, putting a bullet into something with four legs and canine teeth that came within stalking distance of his herd. But when he summoned wildlife officials to investigate, something was off. The dead animal’s canine teeth were too short, the front paws were tiny for a wolf, and the claws on those paws were too long. The ears were too big as well, experts told The Washington Post, and the coat was wrong. This was no wolf. It was a young, non-lactating female and a canid, or member of the dog family, Montana wildlife officials concluded, but that’s about as far as animal experts got. 'We have no idea what this is,' Bruce Auchly, information manager for Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks. 'And we won’t know until we get the DNA tests back.' ..." To continue reading, visit the full article on the Washington Post website. Wootson, Cleve R., Jr. "A Wolflike Creature Was Stalking Livestock in Montana. Authorities Have No Idea What It Is." The Washington Post (May 25, 2018). <https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/animalia/wp/2018/05/25/a-wolflike-creature-was-stalking-livestock-in-montana-authorities-have-no-idea-what-it-is/?utm_term=.5d0ace927d38>
by R. Rini Larson
Wednesday, May 30, 2018
Anti-Racist Barbecuers Take Back Oakland’s Communal Backyard, Lake Merritt 0 R. Rini Larson By Jonathan Kauffman —  "By 11:30 a.m. Sunday, a meaty, righteous aroma wafted up from hundreds of grills set up around the northeastern shore of Lake Merritt. Oakland barbecue stalwart Everett & Jones was flipping yard-long racks of ribs to give away. Vendors of skateboard decks airbrushed with the greats of African American history set up next to political organizers calling out for registered voters. BBQ’n While Black was barely getting started. Three Sundays before, Kenzie Smith and Onsayo Abram had fired up their Weber on the same strip of lawn. They had set up the cooler, the folding table and a couple of folding chairs when a white woman approached the two African American men to complain that they were using a charcoal grill in a non-charcoal-grilling area. Then she called the police and stood there for two hours, sunglasses blocking out her gaze, face stern, cell phone glued to her ear. About 90 minutes into the one-woman standoff, Michelle Snider, Smith’s wife, took out her own phone and filmed herself attempting to talk to the woman. She was still filming when a police officer arrived and the confronter broke down sobbing, telling the officer that she was being harassed. ..." To continue reading, visit the full article on the San Francisco Chronicle website. Kauffman, Jonathan. "Anti-Racist Barbecuers Take Back Oakland’s Communal Backyard at Lake Merritt." San Francisco Chronicle (May 20, 2018). <https://www.sfchronicle.com/bayarea/article/Barbecuers-take-back-Oakland-s-communal-12929602.php>
by R. Rini Larson
Friday, May 25, 2018
3D Scans Help Preserve History, But Who Should Own Them? 0 R. Rini Larson By Laura Rydell —    "War, natural disasters and climate change are destroying some of the world's most precious cultural sites. Google is trying to help preserve these archaeological wonders by allowing users access to 3D images of these treasures through its site.   But the project is raising questions about Google's motivations and about who should own the digital copyrights. Some critics call it a form of "digital colonialism."   When it comes to archaeological treasures, the losses have been mounting. ISIS blew up parts of the ancient city of Palmyra in Syria and an earthquake hit Bagan, an ancient city in Myanmar, damaging dozens of temples, in 2016. In the past, all archaeologists and historians had for restoration and research were photos, drawings, remnants and intuition.   But that's changing. Before the earthquake at Bagan, many of the temples on the site were scanned. One of them, Ananda ok Kyaung, stands out for Chance Coughenour, a manager at Google Arts & Culture. "This is a temple that has incredible murals, floor to ceiling across the inter-passageways and the inter-chamber of the temple," he says.   ..."   To continue reading, visit the full article on NPR.com.   Rydell, Laura. "3D Scans Help Preserve History, But Who Should Own Them?" NPR (May 21, 2018). <https://www.npr.org/sections/alltechconsidered/2018/05/21/609084578/3d-scans-help-preserve-history-but-who-should-own-them>
by R. Rini Larson
Friday, May 25, 2018

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