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Christian Leaders Are Telling Followers that Bigfoot Is Real 0 E. Mee By Alex Bollinger — “Former Family Research Council fellow Tim Dailey was on Janet Mefferd’s Christian radio show where they discussed Bigfoot, and they decided that the mythical creature was created by the devil. On the show, Mefferd brought up ‘the Bigfoot question,’ asking Dailey how Christians should approach it. Dailey made sure to note that, unlike other paranormal sightings, Bigfoot is probably real. He referred to the ‘many, many reliable observers’ who reported seeing Bigfoot, but he said that there was a lack of evidence that the creature exists. ‘It’s real. It’s a projection. It’s a demonic virtual reality, but it’s not nuts-and-bolts, in this case, flesh-and-blood creatures,’ he said. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on LGBTQ Nation’s website. Bollinger, Alex. “Now Christian Leaders Are Telling Followers that Bigfoot Is Real and Spawned by the Devil.” LGBTQ Nation (July 24, 2018). <https://www.lgbtqnation.com/2018/07/now-christian-leaders-telling-followers-bigfoot-real-spawned-devil/>
by E. Mee
Friday, July 27, 2018
Capturing the Beauty of Everyday Life in the Bronx 0 E. Mee By David Gonzalez — “This is not to say that the young photographers of I.C.P. at the Point ignore the problems. Studying photography, writing, critical thinking and public speaking, they have been given the tools to put out an often-overlooked narrative of local life. Their themes reflect their concerns, from music and art to the environment and housing, and challenge viewers — if not demand from them — to see the area’s residents as real, complex characters in a functioning community. In short, people in full. ‘What this is about is seeing that trajectory from beginning as a student to believing your voice has value,’ Ms. Austin said. ‘That your stories are important and deserve to be told and amplified is really what this is about.’ …” To continue reading, visit the full article on The New York Times’s website. Gonzalez, David. “Capturing the Beauty of Everyday Life in the Bronx.” The New York Times (July 24, 2018). <https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/24/lens/capturing-the-beauty-of-everyday-life-in-the-bronx.html?action=click&module=Features&pgtype=Homepage>
by E. Mee
Friday, July 27, 2018
How a Chinese Cook Helped Establish Yosemite and the National Park Service 0 E. Mee By Agnes Constante — “There were meals members of the Mather Mountain Party wouldn’t have believed if they hadn’t eaten them. For one breakfast in the Sierra Nevada Mountains during the summer of 1915, there was ‘fresh fruit, cereal, steak, potatoes, hot cakes and maple syrup, sausage, eggs, hot rolls and coffee,’ Horace Albright, a member of the party, wrote in his book detailing the expedition. And for one dinner, there was ‘soup, trout, chops, fried potatoes, string beans, fresh bread, hot apple pie, cheese and coffee,’ according to the writer Robert Sterling Yard. The meals were prepared by Tie Sing, a backcountry cook working for the United States Geological Survey. In 1915, Stephen Mather, a special assistant to the secretary of the interior, hired Sing to cook for a two-week wilderness expedition intended to convince business and cultural leaders of the importance of a national park system. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on NBC’s website. Constante, Agnes. “How a Chinese Cook Helped Establish Yosemite and the National Park Service.” NBC News (July 22, 2018). <https://www.nbcnews.com/news/amp/ncna890221>
by E. Mee
Friday, July 27, 2018
Smithfield Foods Closes the Only Smokehouse Making Genuine Smithfield Ham 0 E. Mee By Gregory S. Schneider — “The local charity run is the Hog Jog. The mascot for the wine festival is Pig-o-noir. October brings the Bacon & Bourbon Fest. The town museum promises the ‘World’s Oldest Ham.’ The rescue truck at the volunteer fire department is named ‘Hamtown Heavy.’ You could say Smithfield is a little obsessed with pork products, but that would understate how deeply hogs are woven into the history and life of this town of about 8,300 on a hill over the Pagan River. So it has come as a shock that Smithfield Foods is shuttering the last smokehouse that produces the area’s signature product, the genuine Smithfield ham. ‘Really? You’re going to do this?’ was the reaction of local historian and former Smithfield Foods executive Herb De Groft, 77. ‘Country meats are what brought this area to the fore in the 1800s. Word was, the Queen of England used to get one Smithfield ham a year.’ …” To continue reading, visit the full article on The Washington Post’s website. Schneider, Gregory S. “A Sad Day in Hamtown: Smithfield Foods Closes the Only Smokehouse Making Genuine Smithfield Ham.” The Washington Post (July 20, 2018). <https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/virginia-politics/a-sad-day-in-hamtown-smithfield-foods-closes-the-only-smokehouse-making-genuine-smithfield-ham/2018/07/21/dafd57f2-8b7b-11e8-8aea-86e88ae760d8_story.html?utm_term=.84f226542aa5>
by E. Mee
Friday, July 27, 2018
Musicians Keep Tradition Alive: Wyoming's Last Remaining Fiddle Competition 0 R. Rini Larson By Elysia Conner — “Each Tuesday night, a group of musicians gather in a nondescript room at the Natrona County School District offices. They sit together in a small circle, plucking, strumming and fiddling their wooden instruments. Soon, the room is filled with old time Americana music. At the most recent jam session, the local fiddling club’s youngest member, Boone Donley, stood and began to perform a solo. His bow moved under his cowboy hat as the 8-year-old led the melody for ‘Down in the Valley.’ Donley will perform this weekend for judges at the 28th annual Rocky Mountain Regional Fiddle Championships and Music Festival. 'Very good,' said Jay Saul, 78. 'That’s better than the last time I heard you.' …” To continue reading, visit the full article on the Casper Star Tribune’s website. Conner, Elysia. “Musicians Keep Tradition Alive at Wyoming's Last Remaining Fiddle Competition.” Casper Star Tribune (July 19, 2018). <https://trib.com/news/local/casper/musicians-keep-tradition-alive-at-wyoming-s-last-remaining-fiddle/article_ad592775-8a0a-5358-b1fc-6fde8021e2d6.amp.html>
by R. Rini Larson
Friday, July 20, 2018
The Jell-O Family Curse 0 R. Rini Larson By Allie Rowbottom — “1899, LeRoy, New York. My great-great-great-uncle, Orator Woodward, bent over a contract, signing his name to the purchase agreement for a new product: Jell-O. He paid $450, the modern day equivalent of $4,000, a sum that became one of the most profitable business deals in American history, responsible for the ubiquity of Jell-O, the super-wealth generations of my family would inherit, and the curse they came to believe accompanied it. It was through luck and marriage that my family came into the Jell-O legacy. My great-great-aunt, Edith, married Orator Woodward’s son, Ernest, in 1903. The next year, Jell-O sales spiked, driven by the advent of the assembly line and the disappearance of 'the help' from the kitchens of the American middle class. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on Vanity Fair's website. Rowbottom, Allie. “The Jell-O Family Curse.” Vanity Fair (July 19, 2018). <https://www.vanityfair.com/style/2018/07/the-jell-o-family-curse>
by R. Rini Larson
Friday, July 20, 2018
Update on Alice Gerrard Film, Sign Up for Newsletter 0 E. Mee Based in Durham, NC, Groove Productions released a series of updates about their upcoming film, You Gave Me a Song: The Life and Music of Alice Gerrard, including a teaser video. The production team encourages anyone interested to sign up for their newsletter. The Newsletter shares project updates every month or two and also includes recent news regarding Folk Revival musicians.
by E. Mee
Thursday, July 19, 2018
What Rooibos Means to South Africa 0 E. Mee Ishay Govender-Ypma — “Until 1920, the rooibos (African red bush) plant could not be successfully harvested. This changed only when Tryntjie Swarts and her neighbors brought the seeds to Dr. Pieter le Fras Nortier and Benjamin Ginsberg, a settler who was keen on cultivating rooibos for sale. Prior to this, the teeny seeds within the pods were at the mercy of the wind. Your mum will remove the bag, stir in a squeeze of honey from a bottle shaped like a cartoon bear, plop in a slice of lemon and invite you to sit down at the kitchen counter. She’s sipping her tea while tidying up, she never sits, your mother. She tears up the damp tea bags and releases the soggy spiny leaves into a potted plant near the windowsill. Few things go to waste in her kitchen and most of her recycling is done by instinct. Her ferns, roses and pots of orchids thrive, so you figure the red needles must be nutritious. Drinking rooibos with your mother will be your introduction to herbal tea in a community of South African Indians whose standby is the enamel cup of spiced chai or the English cuppa served in porcelain. Funny how colonial habits pass down to the servants’ children too. For centuries the Khoi and San inhabitants, assisted by mules, carried bundles of rooibos down the mountainside of the Cederburg, the only region in the world where it grows. They bruised the green leaves of the leguminous fynbos plant with axes and in the process it oxidized, releasing enzymes and turning earthy-red. It was left to dry and ferment in the sun. The needles of this ‘tea’ were used to create a quenching brew and a health-giving elixir. .…” To continue reading, visit the full article on Extra Crispy's website. Govender-Ypma, Ishay. “What Rooibos Means to South Africa.” Extra Crispy (July 9, 2018). <https://www.washingtonpost.com/amphtml/news/morning-mix/wp/2018/07/18/bodies-of-95-black-forced-labor-prisoners-from-jim-crow-era-unearthed-in-sugar-land-after-one-mans-quest/?noredirect=on>    
by E. Mee
Thursday, July 19, 2018
Bodies Believed To Be Those of 95 Black Forced-Labor Prisoners 0 E. Mee Meagan Flynn — “Today the city of Sugar Land is a sprawling suburb southwest of Houston, home to Imperial Sugar Co., shopping malls and endless cul-de-sacs. But more than a century ago, it was a sprawling network of sugar cane plantations and prison camps. Sugar Land was better known then as the Hellhole on the Brazos. From sunup to sundown, convicts who were leased by the state to plantation owners toiled in the fields chopping sugar cane sometimes until they “dropped dead in their tracks,” as the State Convention of Colored Men of Texas complained in 1883. In modern-day Sugar Land, it was all easy to forget — but not for one man named Reginald Moore, who couldn’t stop thinking about it. Moore started researching Sugar Land’s slavery and convict-leasing history after spending time working as a prison guard at one of Texas’s oldest prisons, and his curiosity intensified. He had a hunch. Based on what he learned, he believed that the bodies of former slaves and black prisoners were still buried in Sugar Land’s backyard. He focused his attention on a site called the Imperial State Prison Farm, the one that bore the name of the country’s premier sugar company. For 19 years, he searched for their bodies, stopping just short of sticking a shovel in the dirt himself. .…” To continue reading, visit the full article on The Washington Post’s website. Flynn, Meagan. “Bodies Believed To Be Those of 95 Black Forced-Labor Prisoners from Jim Crow Era Unearthed in Sugar Land after One Man’s Quest.” The Washington Post (July 18, 2018). <https://www.washingtonpost.com/amphtml/news/morning-mix/wp/2018/07/18/bodies-of-95-black-forced-labor-prisoners-from-jim-crow-era-unearthed-in-sugar-land-after-one-mans-quest/?noredirect=on>    
by E. Mee
Thursday, July 19, 2018
University of Illinois Press E-book Sale: All E-books $4.99 0 E. Mee “It’s the season of reading and to celebrate, we’ve made all our e-books $4.99! Yup. You read that correctly. You can get your favorite UIP e-books for less than five dollars! Don’t miss out on this amazing opportunity to pack your e-reader with UIP books for your summer vacation! Use Promo Code ESUN on our website to get the discount. Sale ends July 21, 2018! *Note: To get the discount, click the “Buy this book” button to add it to your cart and select your preferred format. Enter the promo code in the box when prompted. If you click the e-book icon on our site, it will take you to third party vendors and you will not be able to get the discount through them. …” For more information about the e-book sale and the University of Illinois Press, visit their website.
by E. Mee
Thursday, July 19, 2018
Exhibit Captures the Valley's Rural African-American Communities, 1960s 0 E. Mee Joe Moore — “A new exhibit at the Fresno Art Museum opening Friday July 13th, sheds new light on the history of rural African-American communities in the San Joaquin Valley. It features the work of photographer and journalist Ernest Lowe. From 1960-1964 he documented life in the communities of Dos Palos and Pixley, with fine art, black and white photographs. A student of Dorothea Lange, Lowe's work captures the stories of black families who came to the valley during the Second World War, only to have their lives upended by the mechanization of agriculture a decade later. We spoke with photographer Joel Pickford, an accomplished photographer in his own right, who made the prints for this exhibit, and worked with the Lowe archive. .…” To continue reading and listen to the interview, visit the full article on Valley Public Radio’s website. Moore, Joe. “Exhibit Captures The Valley's Rural African-American Communities in the 1960's with Rare Photos.” Valley Public Radio (July 3, 2018). <http://kvpr.org/post/exhibit-captures-valleys-rural-african-american-communities-1960s-rare-photos>
by E. Mee
Wednesday, July 18, 2018
A Canadian Museum Promotes Indigenous Art. But Don’t Call It ‘Indian’ 0 E. Mee Will a debate over terminology at the Art Gallery of Ontario help the progress of artists who are underrepresented in United States museums? Ted Loos — “A group of visitors young and old gathered at the Art Gallery of Ontario in front of a well-known Canadian painting the docent called ‘Church in Yuquot Village.’ It was a peaceful 1929 image by a national figure, Emily Carr, showing a Mowachaht/Muchalaht settlement she had visited on Vancouver Island. The docent was careful to talk about Carr’s close relationship with ‘the First Nations,’ the popular term in Canada for Indigenous people. What she didn’t mention was the fact that the Art Gallery of Ontario — one of Canada’s most distinguished art museums — had recently renamed Carr’s painting, originally titled ‘Indian Church,’ saying that the old terminology ‘denigrates and discriminates.’ .…” To continue reading, visit the full article on The New York Time’s website. Loos, Ted. “A Canadian Museum Promotes Indigenous Art. But Don’t Call It ‘Indian.’” The New York Times (July 13, 2018). <https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/13/arts/design/art-gallery-of-ontario-indigenous-art.html>
by E. Mee
Tuesday, July 17, 2018
How One Couple Is Fighting to Save Great Falls' Fiddle Music Scene 0 E. Mee Kristen Inbody –– “Ukrainian and Norwegian homesteaders brought their own brand of fiddle music to the homesteads they established in Montana. Our grandparents learned to dance to ‘Happy Boy Schottische’ in country schools and ‘Swallowtail Jig’ in mining camps. Fiddle music remains a worldwide phenomenon, but folk music seems to be fading locally. That's a tide Isaac Callender and Louise Steinway aim to turn. ‘We love playing this kind of music,’ Callender said. ‘It's passing this music on.’ Callender, secretary of the Montana State Old-Time Fiddlers Association, is trying to ‘put some life back into’ the local music scene. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on The Great Falls Tribune’s website. Inbody, Kristen. “How One Couple Is Fighting to Save Great Falls' Fiddle Music Scene.” The Great Falls Tribune (July 13, 2018). <https://amp.greatfallstribune.com/amp/775118002>
by E. Mee
Tuesday, July 17, 2018
L.A. TACO Is a News and Information Platform for the City of Los Angeles 0 E. Mee “L.A. TACO is a platform for the city of Los Angeles. We are a source of news and information related to food, culture, and community for the metropolitan area. We are independently owned and operated, by and for L.A., which means we really love this city! We aim to reach readers, journalists, artists, and partners who love Los Angeles, too. L.A. TACO was founded in late 2006, by its founders’ simple desire to document the things they loved about the city: mostly tacos and street art. Over the years, the site has built a passionate community of readers and contributors who keep the site and its spirit alive, covering music, the food scene, galleries, festivals, and just stuff we like — despite constant downsizing and tumult in the local news market. We also put on special events like Taco Madness. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on L.A. Taco’s website. “What Is L.A. Taco.” L.A. Taco (March 2018). <http://www.lataco.com/about/>
by E. Mee
Tuesday, July 17, 2018
Catalan Human Towers Wow US Crowds on the National Mall 0 E. Mee “Washington DC's iconic National Mall bore witness to an unlikely cultural performance in the form of traditional human tower-builders hailing from the northeastern Spanish region of Catalonia, as documented in epa-efe images released Sunday. Registered on UNESCO's list of the intangible heritage of humanity, these competing groups of acrobatic ‘castellers,’ or builders, stand tall on each other's shoulders and hold tight to their neighbors, starting with a sturdy base of supporters and stacking up level by level in a showdown to see who can reach the headiest of heights. Two rival teams founded in the early 1800s in the town of Valls, some 6,400 kilometers from Washington DC, faced off Saturday in front of crowds of intrigued onlookers as part of the Smithsonian Museum's Folklife Festival, which this year showcases Catalan culture among others. …” To continue reading and to see photographs, visit the full article on News4Europe’s website. “Catalan Human Towers Wow US Crowds on the National Mall in Washington DC.” News4Europe (July 8, 2018). <http://www.news4europe.eu/6369_entertainment/5507177_catalan-human-towers-wow-us-crowds-on-the-national-mall-in-washington-dc.html>
by E. Mee
Tuesday, July 17, 2018
The Secrets and Dreams of a Leather Craftsman 0 E. Mee Marc Silver — “Three decades later, standing 6' 2" tall and wearing a rich purple tunic and trousers, Saley is one of the featured artisans at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival's new "Crafts of African Fashion" program, showcasing the work of "traditional master artisans." The festival takes place in Washington, D.C., on the national mall and ends on Sunday, July 8. Saley is selling leather goods that start at about $20 for a small, multi-hued wallet and go into the hundreds of dollars for shoulder bags etched with striking design. His 11-year-old self knew what he was doing. Diana Baird N'Diaye, senior curator and cultural heritage specialist at the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage, learned about Saley from the world-renowned Nigerian fashion designer Sidahmed Alphadi Seidnaly, known as Alphadi. He's a fan of Saley's leatherwork. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on NPR’s website. Silver, Marc. “The Secrets and Dreams of a Leather Craftsman.” NPR (July 7, 2018). <https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2018/07/07/626147556/the-secrets-and-dreams-of-a-leather-craftsman?utm_source=npr_newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_content=20180712&utm_campaign=goatsandsoda&utm_term=nprnews>
by E. Mee
Thursday, July 12, 2018
Stories Of Wartime, Transformed Through Music (Rahim Alhaj) 0 E. Mee Heard on “All Things Considered” Anastasia Tsioulcas — “Rahim Alhaj is a composer and musician from Baghdad. He was repeatedly imprisoned and tortured for speaking out under Saddam Hussein's regime. Alhaj fled his native country in 1991 — first going to Jordan, then Syria. He says that he heard that the Iraqi secret police intended to murder him abroad. So finally, in 2000, he came to the United States as a refugee, where he was resettled in New Mexico. (It wasn't an easy transition: As a new arrival, he tried to decline a job at a local McDonald's, saying that his music wasn't really right for playing in restaurants.) In 2008, Alhaj became a U.S. citizen, and by 2015, he was given this country's highest prize for traditional and folk artists, the National Heritage Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts. But Alhaj has never left his culture — and music — behind. .…” To continue reading, visit the full article on NPR’s website. Tsioulcas, Anastasia. “Stories Of Wartime, Transformed Through Music.” NPR (July 10, 2018). <https://www.npr.org/2018/07/10/617883155/stories-of-wartime-transformed-through-music>.
by E. Mee
Thursday, July 12, 2018
Trump’s Nativism Is Transforming the Physical Landscape 0 E. Mee Jedediah Purdy — “In his late may commencement address at the Naval Academy, President Trump chose to remind the graduating midshipmen and their families of a particular aspect of American history. ‘Our ancestors conquered a continent,’ he said. This point is part of a larger attack on ‘cynics and critics’ who ‘denigrate America’s incredible heritage.’ Like many of Trump’s actions as president, the speech was a reminder that his particular brand of nationalism takes a keen interest in the meaning of the American land. Even among its other scandals, the Trump administration has drawn attention for its anti-environmental initiatives: withdrawing from the Paris Climate Agreement, ending the Clean Power Plan, and pressing for more drilling offshore and on public land, among many others. These policies cater to the administration’s economic constituencies, to be sure. But they are also about how Trumpian nationalism lays claim to American nature. Nature comes from the Latin root for birth, as in natal, the common origin of everyone. It shares that root with native, as in native land—where a person was born—and so it’s also aligned with nativism, the doctrine that ties political identity and membership to someone’s land of birth, and with nationalism, the myth that defines a people by their birth from a certain land. For centuries this myth has claimed blood and soil as identity, sovereignty, and passport. Trump’s nationalism, too, is bound up in American landscapes, in fights over what makes this place precious and who really belongs here. .…” To continue reading, visit the full article on The Atlantic’s website. Purdy, Jedediah. “Trump’s Nativism Is Transforming the Physical Landscape.” The Atlantic (July 3, 2018). <https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2018/07/trumpian-nativism-is-transforming-the-american-landscape/564026/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=atlantic-weekly-newsletter&utm_content=20180706&silverid-ref=MzEwMTkwMjU0MzA1S0>.
by E. Mee
Tuesday, July 10, 2018
The Fairytale Language of the Brothers Grimm 0 R. Rini Larson Chi Luu — “There once were two brothers from Hanau whose family had fallen on hard times. Their father had died, leaving a wife and six children utterly penniless. Their poverty was so great that the family was reduced to eating but once a day. So it was determined that the brothers must go out into the world to seek their fortune. They soon found their way to the university in Marburg to study law, but there they could not find luck from any quarter. Though they had been the sons of a state magistrate, it was the sons of the nobility that received state aid and stipends. The poor brothers met countless humiliations and obstacles scraping by an education, far from home. Around this time, after Jacob had to abandon his studies to support his family, the entire German kingdom of Westphalia became part of the French Empire under Napoleon Bonaparte’s conquering rule. Finding refuge in the library, the brothers spent many hours studying and searching for stories, poems, and songs that told tales of the people they had left behind. Against the rumblings of war and political upheaval, somehow the nostalgia of stories from an earlier time, of people’s lives and language, in the little villages and towns, in the fields and forest, seemed more important than ever. …” To read the full article, visit Jstor Daily. Luu Chi. “The Fairytale Language of the Brothers Grimm.” Jstor Daily (May 2, 2018). <https://daily.jstor.org/the-fairytale-language-of-the-brothers-grimm/>  
by R. Rini Larson
Tuesday, July 3, 2018
CWCT Announces 2018–2019 Heritage Arts Apprenticeship Program Participants 0 E. Mee The Center for Washington Cultural Traditions (CWCT) has announced the 2018–2019 participants in their inaugural Washington State Heritage Arts Apprenticeship Program.  This program was made possible through the support of the NEA, NEH, and the Washington State legislature. The ten pairs of masters and apprentices will begin their program year in July.  For more information on the participants and the Heritage Arts Apprenticeship Program, visit the Center for Washington Cultural Traditions' website. 
by E. Mee
Friday, June 29, 2018

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