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Sweet Home Café Cookbook Is a Fascinating Look at African American Cooking 0 E. Mee By Lisa Cericola— “The Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington D.C. isn’t just home to thousands of historical artifacts, documents, photography, and other media. The museum’s restaurant, Sweet Home Café, shows the many ways African Americans have shaped the way our country eats through dishes ranging from Fried Green Tomatoes to Senegalese Peanut Soup, to Hickory-Smoked Pork. Since the museum opened in 2016, the restaurant has become such a popular destination that it now has just released its own cookbook with more than 100 recipes from chefs Albert Lukas and Jerome Grant. Although the colorful, inviting photographs in Sweet Home Café Cookbook: A Celebration of African American Cooking will inspire you to get in the kitchen, the passages by culinary historian Jessica B. Harris will make you want to sit down and read. Through recipe descriptions and columns on signature ingredients (such as rice, peanuts, and oysters), Harris defines what African American food is. And it isn’t just Southern food. It’s Northern and Western food, too. It’s city food and it’s country food. And above all, it is global food, with roots that stretch all around the world, including Europe, South America, the Caribbean, and of course, Africa. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on Southern Living’s website. Cericola, Lisa. “A Delicious Recipe Collection With a Side of History.” Southern Living (October 2018). <https://www.southernliving.com/kitchen-assistant/sweet-home-cafe-cookbook>
by E. Mee
Wednesday, October 24, 2018
How Greenlanders Preserve Their Heritage Through Kayaking 0 E. Mee By Abby Sewell — “Cloaked in sealskin suits, a flock of kayakers cuts across a steely expanse of frigid water. A close observer might catch signs of modernity in the vessels’ construction and the kayakers’ attire, but from a distance, the image appears timeless. The world’s largest island, Greenland is a territory of Denmark, with its own government and a large degree of autonomy from the kingdom. Since Greenlanders voted for self-rule in 1979, they have been striving to forge a post-colonial identity. The signs of Danish influence endure, from the Scandinavian-style buildings painted in bold primary colors to the movement from a subsistence economy to a modern market system. But it also includes a revival of one of the most important aspects of the island’s Inuit legacy: the kayak. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on National Geographic’s website. Sewell, Abby. “How Greenlanders Preserve Their Heritage Through Kayaking.” National Geographic. (October 8, 2018). <https://relay.nationalgeographic.com/proxy/distribution/public/amp/travel/destinations/europe/greenland/pictures-national-kayaking-championship-heritage>
by E. Mee
Monday, October 15, 2018
Native American Imagery Is All Around Us, While People Are Often Forgotten 0 E. Mee By Mark Trahant —   “The problem began with one word: ‘America.’ That word, honoring Italian explorer Amerigo Vespucci, was coined in Europe in 1507, when it was used on a map of the New World. But back then, the only Americans were indigenous. It was our world, but it wasn’t our word. By the time the Declaration of Independence was signed in 1776, white people were simply referred to as ‘the Americans.’ My ancestors were called American Indians. It’s a label twisted by accidents of history: The Italian explorer who gets his name on two continents and another Italian, Christopher Columbus, who dubbed indigenous people ‘Indians,’ presumably because he thought he was in the East Indies. …”  To continue reading, visit the full article on National Geographic’s website. Trahant, Mark. “Native American Imagery Is All Around Us, While the People Are Often Forgotten.” National Geographic (October 5, 2018). <https://www.nationalgeographic.com/culture-exploration/2018/10/indigenous-peoples-day-cultural-appropriation/>
by E. Mee
Thursday, October 11, 2018
Before ‘Smallfoot’ and Bigfoot, Native Tribes Told Stories of Creatures 0 E. Mee By Craig Sailor —  “Visitors won’t find the words ‘myth’ or ‘story’ in a new Sasquatch exhibit at the White River Valley Museum. It’s not that the big hairy guy is treated as fact. It’s just that he’s treated with respect at the Auburn museum. ‘Sasquatch, Ancient Native Perspective on the Mysterious Beings of the Woods’ looks at the histories of Bigfoot-like creatures that lived, imagined or not, alongside the tribes of the Pacific Northwest. ‘Native cultures take these very seriously, and they continue to do so today,’ said curator Patricia Cosgrove. ‘By and large, people don’t talk about these.  …” To continue reading, visit the full article on The News Tribune’s website. Sailor, Craig. “Before ‘Smallfoot’ and Bigfoot, Native Tribes Told Stories of Child-Stealing Creatures of the Woods.” The News Tribune. (September 28, 2018). <http://amp.thenewstribune.com/news/local/article219134245.html>
by E. Mee
Thursday, October 11, 2018
Netflix Partners With Inaugural Smithsonian African American Film Festival 0 E. Mee By Nate Nickolai — “The Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture announced on Tuesday that it will partner with Netflix in preparation for its inaugural Smithsonian African American Film Festival this October. As part of the partnership, Netflix will also screen its upcoming documentary ‘Quincy’ at the fest. ‘The museum is pleased to collaborate with Netflix in order to explore important moments in the history of America through the African American lens,’ said founding director Lonnie G. Bunch III. ‘We are pleased the first production of Netflix is a film that honors Quincy Jones, whose creativity and commitment to racial justice is an example of the best of America.’ The biannual festival, which will take place from Oct. 24 to Oct. 27, will include works from both veteran and new filmmakers, alongside historic films that celebrate African American life. The fest will also feature a film competition, movie screenings from the museum’s own collection, and other national film premieres. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on Variety’s website. Nickolai, Nate. “Netflix Partners With Inaugural Smithsonian African American Film Festival.” Variety. (September 18, 2018). <https://variety.com/2018/film/news/quincy-netflix-smithsonian-african-american-film-festival-1202946833/>
by E. Mee
Thursday, October 11, 2018
The Dad-Joke Doctrine 0 E. Mee By Ashley Fetters — “It would be difficult to make the case that the ‘guy who died in the round barn’ joke, a classic Midwest joke, is funny in its own right—though I would argue it’s pretty funny how much my dad still loves telling it. Which makes it a shining example of one of America’s great familial oral traditions: the dad joke. In recent years, the mass-sharing capabilities of the internet have facilitated a renewed (eye-rolling, faux-begrudging) appreciation of the dad joke. The Reddit page r/dadjokes, a forum where users go to share and enjoy ‘the jokes that make you laugh and cringe in equal measure,’ has more than 1 million subscribers and amasses several new posts every hour. The online video series Dad Jokes, which pits comedians and celebrities against each other in dad-joke-telling competitions where ‘if you laugh you lose,’ launched in 2017 and today has some 999,000 followers on Facebook. Twitter users, meanwhile, frequently call each other (and themselves) out for their simplest and squeaky-cleanest puns by tweeting ‘#dadjoke.’ …” To continue reading, visit the full article on The Atlantic’s website. Fetters, Ashley. “The Dad-Joke Doctrine.” The Atlantic. (September 25, 2018). <https://www.theatlantic.com/family/archive/2018/09/deconstructing-the-dad-joke/571174/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=atlantic-weekly-newsletter&utm_content=20180928&silverid-ref=MzEwMTkwMjU0MzA1S0>  
by E. Mee
Thursday, October 11, 2018
At the Cowboy Poetry Gathering, Tall Tales, Resonant Rhymes 0 E. Mee By Chris Wohlwend —  “As a sellout crowd jostled its way into the first big show of the 34th annual National Cowboy Poetry Gathering on a late-January night in Elko, Nev., old friends backslapped each other and laughed about past gatherings. It was a rowdy, good-natured opening of what has become the premier celebration of The Cowboy Way. The atmosphere was not surprising — Elko, population about 18,000, sits in the northeastern corner of Nevada, an oasis in the Great Basin’s high-desert terrain and the center of the area’s ranching lifestyle. And the gathering commemorates the end-of-the-cattle-drive festivities that defined the Old West, with camaraderie and all that the term encompasses: tall tales, poetry and songs, dancing, gambling, thick steaks and strong drinks. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on The New York Times’s website. Wohlwend, Chris. “At the Cowboy Poetry Gathering, Tall Tales, Resonant Rhymes.” The New York Times (September 26, 2018). <https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/26/travel/cowboy-poetry-gathering-nevada.html>
by E. Mee
Monday, October 8, 2018
NACF Supports Work of Reclaiming Native Truth 0 E. Mee By T. Lulani Arquette— “At an international conference I attended this year, a Caucasian male speaker who has traveled the nation and world extensively, had this to say, “Go anyplace in the world and ask anybody about America; they’ll bring up names like Taylor Swift or Rex Tillerson and so forth; there is zero consciousness of indigenous people of America, and if there is, it’s been shaped by popular media and institutions that support the misrepresentations.” In 2017, research was undertaken and co-led by two Native organizations, First Nations Development Institute and EchoHawk Consulting, to help determine what the American population  knows or doesn’t know about indigenous peoples of the continental United States. It was the first time that research and information of this nature was being brought together in one study. Reclaiming Native Truth was released in June of this year. Key findings are not surprising and reveal bias and stereotypes that keep Native Americans invisible, and limit indigenous peoples’ ability to celebrate contemporary cultural identity and attain racial equity.   …”   To continue reading, visit the full blog post on Native Arts and Cultures Foundation’s website.   Arquette, T. Lulani. “NACF Supports Work of Reclaiming Native Truth.” Native Arts and Cultures Foundation (September 2018). <http://www.nativeartsandcultures.org/nacf-supports-work-of-reclaiming-native-truth>
by E. Mee
Monday, October 1, 2018
The People of Freetown: Edna Lewis 0 E. Mee By Mayukh Sen — “Edna Lewis knew what it was like to be poor. She was born in 1916 in Freetown, Virginia, a town formed by a group of newly emancipated former slaves, one of whom was Lewis’s grandfather. Flush with farmland, Freetown was a small community, and tight-knit as a result. When Lewis lived there as a child, everyone, even the kids, worked hard. But they learned to find pleasure in their labor, because its fruits gave them sweet relief: wild strawberries, walnuts, persimmons. ‘Whenever there were major tasks on the farm, work that had to be accomplished quickly (and timing is so important in farming), then everyone pitched in, not just family but neighbors as well,’ she wrote in her second cookbook, 1976’s The Taste of Country Cooking, arguably the most famous of the four cookbooks she published throughout her lifetime. ‘And afterward we would all take part in the celebrations, sharing the rewards that follow hard labor. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on Popula’s website. Sen, Mayukh. “The People of Freetown.” Popula (July 19, 2018). <https://popula.com/2018/09/26/the-people-of-freetown/>
by E. Mee
Thursday, September 27, 2018
"Welcome to Baltimore, Hon": The Urban Folklore of Local Speech 0 E. Mee   This feature on folklorist David Puglia's new book on urban folklore in Baltimore provides a wonderful preview of the location of next year's AFS Annual Meeting!  By Bronx Community College — “Accents and dialects not only delineate but in many ways bolster regional identities in the U.S., but words play an equally important role as well. For Baltimore natives, the moniker 'hon' carries one such storied tradition, which Bronx Community College Professor David J. Puglia investigates in his new book Tradition, Urban Identity, and the Baltimore ‘Hon’. Puglia examines the word’s rich history, concentrating on the role it played in establishing and perpetuating Baltimoreans’ sense of identity. Drawing on a case study in which a local man added ‘hon’ to the Baltimore-Washington Parkway’s sign 'Welcome to Baltimore,' Puglia reveals how that act shifted folk speech into a more consequential context. The graffiti ‘transformed [‘hon’] from a stigmatized word associated with working-class Baltimoreans to an esteemed word tied to local roots and native city identity,’ Puglia writes. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on SUM’s website. Bronx Community College. “’Welcome to Baltimore, Hon’: The Urban Folklore of Local Speech.” SUM (September 2018). <https://sum.cuny.edu/welcome-to-baltimore-hon/#>
by E. Mee
Wednesday, September 26, 2018
Kerala’s Women Farmers Rise Above the Flood 0 E. Mee An article by 2018 AFS Presidential-Invited Lecturer Palagummi Sainath — “’The fine dust from the drying silt and the pollution from all the muck lying on the fields is quite nasty,’ says Dathan C.S. in Pattanamthitta. ‘Please wear this,’ he adds, handing me a surgeon’s mask. Behind him, a woman laughs at this – one of those whose farms have been ruined by the Kerala floods. ‘He lives in Mumbai,’ she scoffs, ‘what protection from pollution could he possibly need?’ The fields are a picture of devastation. What was once a fine, profit-making patch of paddy and tapioca, lies buried under inches – in some places, feet – of silt from the river bed, and effluents and pollutants brought in from upstream by the flood waters. Across many acres of farmland, that deadly mix of muck and matter has dried out and hardened in the blazing sun, covering the soil like a blanket of crude cement. Water tables are falling, groundwater recharge isn’t happening, wells are drying out, temperatures rising. All this and more has perversely impacted the entire equation between surface and groundwater. River ecologies have been dramatically transformed. With the loss of their sand beds and silt, many rivers and streams are now unable to retain water. And so, oddly enough, the next calamity Kerala faces could be a drought.  Restoring cultivation in this situation could dishearten the most determined. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on PARI’s website. Palagummi Sainath will give the Presidential-Invited Lecture at the 2018 Annual Meeting in Buffalo this year. Visit the 2018 Annual Meeting News and Announcements page for more information about the upcoming Meeting.  Sainath, Palagummi. “Kerala’s Women Farmers Rise Above the Flood.” PARI (September 24, 2018). <https://ruralindiaonline.org/articles/keralas-women-farmers-rise-above-the-flood>
by E. Mee
Wednesday, September 26, 2018
The CIA Joke-Book: US Declassifies Cache of Soviet Jokes 0 E. Mee By Chris Pleasance — “A cache of Soviet jokes that was compiled by CIA agents during the Cold War has been released among a cache of declassified documents. All the jokes were told between Soviets but picked up by CIA operatives before being relayed back to Washington. The list was addressed to the Deputy Director of the CIA but it is believed to have been circulated among senior White House officials. One joke featuring Ronald Reagan made it to the president's desk and he found it so funny he began using it himself. The quip goes: 'An American tells a Russia that the United States is so free that he can stand outside the White House and yell ‘to hell with Ronald Reagan.’ The Russian replies: 'That's nothing, I can stand outside the Kremlin and yell 'to hell with Ronald Reagan too!’ …” To continue reading, visit the full article on The Daily Mail’s website. Pleasance, Chris. “The CIA Joke-book: US Declassifies Cache of Soviet Jokes Its Agents Compiled during the Cold War to Gauge Public Mood in the USSR.” The Daily Mail (September 21, 2018). <https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6192733/amp/CIA-declassifies-cache-Soviet-jokes-agents-compiled-Cold-War.html>
by E. Mee
Monday, September 24, 2018
The Brilliant, Playful, Bloodthirsty Raven 0 E. Mee By Helen MacDonald — “I can make a passable imitation of a raven’s low, guttural croak, and whenever I see a wild one flying overhead I have an irresistible urge to call up to it in the hope that it will answer back. Sometimes I do, and sometimes it does; it’s a moment of cross-species communication that never fails to thrill. Ravens are strangely magical birds. Partly that magic is made by us. They have been seen variously as gods, tricksters, protectors, messengers, and harbingers of death for thousands of years. But much of that magic emanates from the living birds themselves. Massive black corvids with ice-pick beaks, dark eyes, and shaggy-feathered necks, they have a distinctive presence and possess a fierce intelligence. Watching them for any length of time has the same effect as watching great apes: It’s hard not to start thinking of them as people. Nonhuman people, but people all the same. The most celebrated ravens in the world live at the Tower of London, on the River Thames, an 11th-century walled enclosure of towers and buildings that houses the Crown Jewels and that over the ages has functioned as a royal palace, a zoo, a prison, and a place of execution. Today it is one of Britain’s most visited tourist attractions, and its ravens amble across its greens entirely unbothered by the crowds, walking with a gait that Charles Dickens—who kept ravens—described as resembling ‘a very particular gentleman with exceedingly tight boots on, trying to walk fast over loose pebbles’ …” To continue reading, visit the full article on The Atlantic’s website. MacDonald, Helen. “The Brilliant, Playful, Bloodthirsty Raven.” The Atlantic (October 2018). <https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2018/10/ravens-tower-of-london/568312/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=magazine&utm_content=20180920&silverid-ref=MzEwMTkwMjU0MzA1S0>
by E. Mee
Monday, September 24, 2018
Shockingly Candid Photos Of Life on a 1970s Arkansas Prison Farm 0 E. Mee By Mark Murrmann — “Bruce Jackson got into photography as a means to an end. Working as an ethnographer studying African American work songs in Texas prisons, Jackson started taking photos for reference. While doing this work in the late ’60s, he met Terrell Don Hutto, assistant warden of the Ramsey Prison Farm in 1967. In 1971, Hutto was named commissioner of the Arkansas Department of Corrections. He later cofounded the Corrections Corporation of America(now CoreCivic), America’s first private, for-profit prison company. Today, a detention centerin Texas named after Hutto holds immigrant families.  Jackson’s connection to Hutto allowed him access to prisons in Texas and Arkansas, including the 16,000-acre Cummins Farm Unit, where Hutto lived in Arkansas. Jackson initially went to Cummins to see how Hutto was reforming the state prison system, which had been put under federal supervision after a judge described it as ‘a dark and evil world’ that violated prisoners’ constitutional rights. (An incident in which bodies were found buried on the Cummins grounds was later depicted in the 1980 Robert Redford film, Brubaker.) …” To continue reading, visit the full article on Mother Jones’s website. Murrmann, Mark. “Shockingly Candid Photos Of Life on a 1970s Arkansas Prison Farm.” Mother Jones (September 8, 2018). < https://www.motherjones.com/crime-justice/2018/09/cummins-prison-farm-photo-essay/>
by E. Mee
Monday, September 17, 2018
The Folk Alchemy of Hiss Golden Messenger 0 E. Mee  By David A. Graham — “Almost a decade ago, a failed musician sat down at his kitchen table in Pittsboro, North Carolina, and began singing some new songs into a portable cassette player. M. C. Taylor had spent his youth dabbling in bands, skateboarding, and drugs in Southern California, but had given up on music and moved east to study folklore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Taylor had to sing softly—his baby son was asleep in the other room—and the audio quality was, in his words, ‘a joke.’ He called the collection Bad Debt, which, given the reeling economy, was timely. The songs were not, abounding with gospel signifiers, road narratives, and impressionistic blues, all accompanied simply on acoustic guitar. The prophetic images bore some resemblance to old, weird Americana, with the grim fatalism and religious fervor of British ballads refracted through Appalachia. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on The Atlantic’s website. Graham, David A. “The Folk Alchemy of Hiss Golden Messenger.” The Atlantic. (September 12, 2018). <https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2018/09/the-folk-alchemy-of-hiss-golden-messenger/569971/>
by E. Mee
Wednesday, September 12, 2018
Tiny U.S. Island is Drowning. Residents Deny the Reason 0 E. Mee Interview with Earl Swift by Simon Worrall — “You say Tangier Island is ‘a community unlike any in America.’ Put it on the map for us; explain what is so special about it. Tangier Island is a squiggle of mud and marsh in the middle of the Chesapeake Bay, which is about 30 miles wide at that point, and a dozen miles from the nearest mainland port, Crisfield, Maryland. It is home to roughly 460 people, all of them descended from the first settler on the island, a guy named Joseph Crocket, who moved there in 1778. Though it’s only 100 miles from Washington, D.C., it’s among the most isolated communities in the East. The island’s isolation has spawned a style of speech that you’ll not hear anywhere else in America. Rising sea levels may make the island uninhabitable in 50 years. Yet the islanders think global warming is a hoax. How do they square those two things? I don’t think the islanders find the rising water around them to be a hoax. They can see it happening with their own eyes. But they believe that simple erosion, caused by wind-driven waves, has been the cause of the island’s shrinkage, which has lost an average of 8 acres per year since 1850. …” To continue reading, visit the full interview on National Geographic’s website. Worrall, Simon. “Tiny U.S. Island is Drowning. Residents Deny the Reason.” National Geographic. (September 7, 2018). <https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/2018/09/climate-change-rising-seas-tangier-island-chesapeake-book-talk/>
by E. Mee
Monday, September 10, 2018
Much More Irishness': Newfoundland Hears Its Own Distinct Voices From 1970s 0 E. Mee By Holly McKenzie-Sutter— “In the 1970s, Aidan O'Hara became known on Newfoundland's Cape Shore as ‘the real Irishman’ who came to town armed with a recorder, gathering traditional songs and stories. The Donegal-born broadcaster eventually produced documentaries showcasing the province's unique Irish-influenced culture for viewers and listeners in Ireland itself. The population of Newfoundland and Labrador was once almost half Irish or Irish descendants. According to the latest Canadian census, that number is now estimated at around 20 per cent, but the cultural influence remains strong in the outport communities settled by Irish immigrants in the 18th and 19th centuries. Before his extended visit in the 1970s, O'Hara recalls an Ireland that wasn't aware of the strong Irish influence in outport communities like Branch. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on CBC’s website. McKenzie-Sutter, Holly. “'Much More Irishness': Newfoundland Hears Its Own Distinct Voices From 1970s.” The Canadian Press. (August 2, 2018). <https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/distinct-newfoundland-voices-aidan-ohara-1.4772481>
by E. Mee
Monday, September 10, 2018
How a Newfoundland Folklorist Introduced Jerry Garcia to Bluegrass Music 0 E. Mee By Juanita Mercer — “Before forming the Grateful Dead, Jerry Garcia spent the early 1960s playing bluegrass music. In a local twist, his introduction to the genre came partly from St. John’s-based folklorist, bluegrass aficionado and Grammy Award-winner Neil Rosenberg. Rosenberg wrote the liner notes for the recently released ‘Before the Dead’ album — a collection of Garcia’s performances — mostly bluegrass — that marked the beginning of his ‘long, strange trip’ to stardom. Rosenberg moved to Newfoundland in 1968 when he became a folklore professor at Memorial University, but he spent his youth in Berkeley, Calif., where he was in a band called The Redwood Canyon Ramblers. They were the San Francisco Bay Area’s first bluegrass band when they formed in 1959. They were also the first bluegrass band Garcia ever saw in concert. He would go on to spend the first few years of the 1960s practising and performing bluegrass tunes. Fast-forward to May 1964. Rosenberg was in the last year of his folklore master’s degree program at Indiana University when Garcia paid him a visit. It was Garcia’s first trip outside of California; he was on a mission to learn more about bluegrass. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on The Telegram’s website. Mercer, Juanita. “Before the Dead: How a Newfoundland and Labrador Folklorist Introduced Jerry Garcia to Bluegrass Music.” The Telegram. (September 1, 2018). <http://www.thetelegram.com/living/before-the-dead-how-a-newfoundland-and-labrador-folklorist-introduced-jerry-garcia-to-bluegrass-music-238182/>
by E. Mee
Wednesday, September 5, 2018
Philip Pullman: Why We Believe in Magic 0 E. Mee By Philip Pullman — “A new exhibition at the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford brings together a multitude of objects and artworks – there’s a ‘poppet’ or rag doll with a stiletto stuck through its face, an amulet containing a human heart, a wisp of ‘ectoplasm’ apparently extruded by a medium in Wales, and too many others to count – from a dark world of nonsense and superstition that we ought to have outgrown a long time ago. At least, that’s how I imagine rationality would view it. I find myself in an awkward position rationality-wise, because my name is listed on the website of the Rationalist Association as a supporter, and at the same time I think this exhibition is full of illuminating things, and the mental world it illustrates is an important – no, an essential part of the life we live. I’d better try to work out what I mean. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on The Guardian’s website. Pullman, Philip. “Philip Pullman: Why We Believe in Magic.” The Guardian. (September 1, 2018). <https://www.theguardian.com/books/2018/sep/01/the-limits-of-reason-philip-pullman-on-why-we-believe-in-magic>
by E. Mee
Tuesday, September 4, 2018
Brazil Museum Fire: ‘Incalculable’ Loss 0 E. Mee By Dom Phillips — “Brazil’s oldest and most important historical and scientific museum has been consumed by fire, and much of its archive of 20 million items is believed to have been destroyed. The fire at Rio de Janeiro’s 200-year-old National Museum began after it closed to the public on Sunday and raged into the night. There were no reports of injuries, but the loss to Brazilian science, history and culture was incalculable, two of its vice-directors said. ‘It was the biggest natural history museum in Latin America. We have invaluable collections. Collections that are over 100 years old,’ Cristiana Serejo, one of the museum’s vice-directors, told the G1 news site. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on The Guardian’s website. Phillips, Dom. “Brazil Museum Fire: ‘Incalculable’ Loss As 200-year-old Rio Institution Gutted.” The Guardian. (September 3, 2018). <https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/sep/03/fire-engulfs-brazil-national-museum-rio>
by E. Mee
Tuesday, September 4, 2018

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