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Amid Rapid Change, Blue-Collar Astoria Pauses for Poetry 0 R. Rini Larson By Knute Berger and Matt M. McKnight —  "ASTORIA, Ore. — It was a gathering that drew us to Astoria, just where U.S. Highway 101 crosses into Oregon from Washington. Route 101 snakes its way along the West Coast from California to Washington state. In our state, it finally moves away from the shoreline and loops like a boathook around the Olympic Mountains back down Hood Canal and ends in Tumwater, onetime terminus for the Oregon Trail. The highway is famous for its scenery and stretches that can induce carsickness with its curves and dips. It’s also known as a road that reflects the culture, history and differing communities and political viewpoints of our state. For the beginning of an occasional series on the people and places along Highway 101, Crosscut photojournalist Matt M. McKnight and I decided to start in Astoria at the mouth of the Columbia River. ..." To continue reading, visit the full article on the The Crosscut website. Berger, Knute and Matt M. McKnight. "Amid Rapid Change, Blue-Collar Astoria Pauses for Poetry." The Crosscut (March 30, 2018). <https://crosscut.com/2018/03/amid-rapid-change-blue-collar-astoria-pauses-poetry>
by R. Rini Larson
Tuesday, April 17, 2018
Move Over, Brisket. There Are Fresher Foods 'Too Good To Passover' 0 R. Rini Larson By Deena Prichep —  "Passover is a holiday celebrating the Jews' exodus from slavery — and also a broader embrace of the coming spring, of fresh green shoots both literal and metaphorical. But the menu? More often than not, in America, you're talking stodgy winter foods like gefilte fish and brisket, seasoned (if at all) with heavy aromatics. These aren't dishes that point to the coming spring. They're dishes that come from the root cellar. That's because the majority of American Jews are Ashkenazim, with roots in chilly Eastern Europe. But cookbook writer and culinary instructor Jennifer Abadi's family (and family recipes) came from Syria. Growing up, Seder meals involved lamb shanks and lemony soup with rice and meatballs. And after teaching cooking classes where students were hungry for these sunnier flavors, she began collecting recipes from other Sephardic and Judeo-Arabic first-generation families, preserving both the dishes and the stories behind them. ..." To continue reading, visit the full article on NPR.com. Prichep, Deena. "Move Over, Brisket. There Are Fresher Foods 'Too Good To Passover.'" NPR (March 29, 2018). <https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2018/03/29/597127739/move-over-brisket-there-are-fresher-foods-too-good-to-passover>
by R. Rini Larson
Friday, March 30, 2018
Using Story to Change Systems 0 R. Rini Larson By Ella Satlmarshe —  "In Liverpool, an exhausted homeless shelter worker puts her head in her hands at the end of another long day. The system she works in is failing the people it is supposed to serve, and she feels powerless to change it. In Qatar, a group of migrant workers toil under a blazing sun, building the new stadium for the World Cup. Soon they will return to a filthy, overcrowded labor camp for a few hours rest. Subjected to forced labor, they are dying in record numbers. In Singapore, a group of scientists, policymakers, and NGOs try to understand how to build a resilient agricultural system. They struggle to agree on anything. Each of these bleak scenarios illustrates the role of story in changing a system. Stories make, prop up, and bring down systems. Stories shape how we understand the world, our place in it, and our ability to change it. ..." To continue reading, visit the full article on Stanford Social Innovation Review website. Saltmarshe, Ella. "Using Story to Change Systems." Stanford Social Innovation Review (February 20 2018). <https://ssir.org/articles/entry/using_story_to_change_systems>
by R. Rini Larson
Tuesday, March 27, 2018
How a Chance Encounter Launched a Revival of Irish American Music 0 R. Rini Larson By Mick Moloney —  "In 1973, I came to the United States to study folklore at the University of Pennsylvania, where Professor Kenneth Goldstein—my main inspiration and mentor—was head of the department. I took a trip to Nashville in 1974 to attend the American Folklore Society (AFS) annual meeting. There was not much time for music, but I did have some old-time sessions with fiddlers Alan Jabbour and Richard Blaustein. The AFS had set aside a few rooms for young graduate students who had no money for accommodations. So the first night, when there was a party going on in my room, I sat alone on the floor with my back against the wall, took out my tenor banjo, closed my eyes, as I often do when playing, and started to play some reels. To my astonishment, I heard the sounds of an accompanying guitar with tasteful and accurate chords. I opened my eyes and there was a middle-aged, bearded, dapper man playing along with me. I said, 'I’m Mick.' He said, 'I’m Ralph.' ..." To continue reading, visit the full article on the Smithsonian Institution's website. Moloney, Mick. "How a Chance Encounter Launched a Revival of Irish American Music." Folklife: Smithsonian Institution (March 15, 2018). <https://folklife.si.edu/magazine/how-a-chance-encounter-launched-a-revival-of-irish-american-music>
by R. Rini Larson
Friday, March 23, 2018
New Collections on Voices from the Fisheries 0 R. Rini Larson Over the past two months, Voices from the Fisheries has added four new collections to its online database, including The Last Sardine Cannery, Alaska Native Women in Fisheries, Beneath the Surface of San Diego, and West Side Stories. View these collections and more at: https://www.voices.nmfs.noaa.gov/. To quote the Voices from the Fisheries website,  "The Voices from the Fisheries Database is a central repository for consolidating, archiving, and disseminating oral history interviews related to commercial, recreational, and subsistence fishing in the United States and its territories. Oral history interviews are a powerful way to document the human experience with our marine, coastal, and Great Lakes environments and our living marine resources. Each story archived here provides a unique example of this connection collected from fishermen, their spouses, processing workers, shoreside business workers and operators, recreational and subsistence fishermen, scientists, marine resources managers, and others—all among the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's fishery stakeholders. Separately, each history provides an in depth view into the professional and personal lives of individual participants. Together, they have the power to illuminate common themes, issues and concerns across diverse fishing communities over time. The Voices from the Fisheries Database is a powerful resource available to the public to inform, educate, and provide primary information for researchers interested in our local, human experience with the surrounding marine environment." Voices from the Fisheries is eager to add more collections to its database. Send information about your project, organization, or ideas to: Molly Graham, Project Manager Voices from the Fisheries voices@noaa.gov 207-807-0109 www.voices.nmfs.noaa.gov
by R. Rini Larson
Wednesday, March 21, 2018
Sally Van de Water Appears in Guardian Story on Iranian Weightlifting 0 R. Rini Larson By Brian Oliver —  "If you are good at weightlifting in Iran, you can become as rich as a Premier League footballer. The country boasts 300 professional weightlifters, dedicated arenas in every sizable town, and full-time officials in all 31 provinces. When an Olympic champion got married in 2006, his wedding made national television news. ‘Weightlifting is more popular in Iran than in any other country,’ said Mohammad Barkhah, the national team’s head coach. Only football is more popular and, as with football, the sport has historically been an overwhelmingly male domain – until now. Next month four teenagers are set to become the first female weightlifters to represent Iran – in a competition in Uzbekistan. The young women have the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo in their sights, and weightlifting has become an unlikely vehicle of female empowerment. … The Americans were in Ahvaz to help launch Iran’s female weightlifting programme, making sporting history along the way. Garza Papandrea, a highly qualified coach who is president of USA Weightlifting and vice-president of the sport’s global governing body, the International Weightlifting Federation, became the first woman to coach a man in an Iranian competition when she helped Derrick Johnson to victory in the Fajr Cup 62kg class on the first day. US technical official Sally Van de Water, who is also state folklorist for Pennsylvania, was the first woman to referee in a men’s competition. …" To continue reading, visit the full article on The Guardian's website. Oliver, Brian "Child’s Tears Spark Weightlifting Protest that Raises Bar for Iran’s Sportswomen." The Guardian (March 17, 2018). <https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2018/mar/17/weightlifting-protest-raises-bar-iran-sportswomen-two-young-girls?CMP=share_btn_fb>
by R. Rini Larson
Tuesday, March 20, 2018
What Can an Old Folk Song Tell Us? 0 R. Rini Larson By Robert Sullivan —  "Anna & Elizabeth is a band whose name is a nod to Hazel & Alice, the all-woman bluegrass duo that was recorded on the Smithsonian Folkways label at a time in the mid-sixties when the bluegrass musicians being recorded were almost all men. Like Hazel Dickens and Alice Gerrard, Anna Roberts-Gevalt and Elizabeth LaPrelle met in the South, where LaPrelle grew up and, even as a teen-ager, sang famously beautiful versions of old songs, such as “Pretty Saro” and “Matty Groves.” Roberts-Gevalt grew up in Vermont. In college, she fell in love with fiddle music and all the Folkways recordings. As soon as she graduated, she moved to southwestern Virginia to learn banjo, which is where she met LaPrelle.  The duo’s début album, released in 2016, was a spare collection of Southern folk songs, their harmonies tight and beautiful, backed by LaPrelle’s banjo and Roberts-Gevalt’s clawhammer guitar. On that first effort, one old song ventured north of the Mason-Dixon Line, or almost did: “Going Cross the Mountain” tells of a man from the South who goes to fight for the Union. That song turns out to be a preface, in retrospect, for “The Invisible Comes to Us,” Anna & Elizabeth’s sophomore effort, which includes some Southern songs but mostly Northern ones—a kind of surprise for both artists, especially the one from the North. ..." To continue reading, visit the full article on The New Yorker website. Sullivan, Robert. "What Can an Old Folk Song Tell Us?" The New Yorker (March 17, 2018). <https://www.newyorker.com/culture/culture-desk/what-can-an-old-folk-song-tell-us>
by R. Rini Larson
Saturday, March 17, 2018
Music And Protest, Hand In Hand: Songs Of The Student Walkouts 0 R. Rini Larson By Katherine Meizel — "For 17 minutes yesterday, one minute for each of the students killed in Parkland, Florida on Valentine's Day, thousands of America's schoolchildren walked out of class and took the mic. Many faced parental or administrative wrath. But they stood together, or even alone, to clearly declare their grief, fear and desire for change in speeches, chanting, slam poetry and poignant song. Surveying these musical performances together is overwhelming—there are familiar songs, brand-new numbers written by protestors, choirs of tots and teens, secular and religious compositions, a cappella groups and solo troubadours with guitars. But overall, with a few outliers, the performances might be sorted into five basic thematic categories: Songs that drove the African American Civil Rights movement: ‘We Shall Overcome,’ ‘Will the Circle Be Unbroken,’ ‘Peace Like a River,’ ‘Amazing Grace.’ Yesterday's demonstration, as with many U.S. social movements, was largely made possible by the history of protest shaped by African-American youth. ..." To continue reading, visit the full article on NPR's website. Meizel, Katherine. "Music And Protest, Hand In Hand: Songs Of The Student Walkouts." NPR (March 15, 2018). <https://www.npr.org/sections/therecord/2018/03/15/593866152/music-and-protest-hand-in-hand-songs-of-the-student-walkouts>
by R. Rini Larson
Saturday, March 17, 2018
No, the Irish Were Not Slaves Too 0 R. Rini Larson By David M. Perry —  "Historian Liam Hogan has spent the last six years debunking the Irish slave myth. Call it 'fake history.' Whenever people on social media start talking slavery, reparations, and race, some Internet troll will jump up and demand, 'What about the Irish?' Over the past few years, the myth of Irish slavery has found fertile ground in Internet memes as a way to derail any conversation about historical complicity for white folks in the slave trade or the need for affirmative action today. If the Irish escaped from slavery to general inclusion and prosperity, the false and racist argument goes, then African Americans can do likewise. Fortunately, whenever this claim starts to get traction, a librarian from Limerick steps forward to debunk it. Liam Hogan works at the Limerick City Library, in Ireland. He's well known to his 30,000-plus Twitter followers and readers as a passionate and informed voice working against the myths of Irish slavery, while never erasing the complexities and nuance of the history of Irish forced labor. With St. Patrick's Day nearly here, Pacific Standard caught up with Hogan over a series of emails to discuss his work, the pernicious nature of the Irish slave myth, and what we can do to counter this false narrative. ..." To continue reading, visit the full article on the Pacific Standard website. Perry, David M. "No, the Irish Were Not Slaves Too." Pacific Standard (March 15, 2018). <https://psmag.com/social-justice/the-irish-were-not-slaves>
by R. Rini Larson
Saturday, March 17, 2018
National Geographic: "For Decades, Our Coverage Was Racist." 0 R. Rini Larson By Susan Goldberg (National Geographic, Editor in Chief) —  "We asked a preeminent historian to investigate our coverage of people of color in the U.S. and abroad. Here’s what he found. It is November 2, 1930, and National Geographic has sent a reporter and a photographer to cover a magnificent occasion: the crowning of Haile Selassie, King of Kings of Ethiopia, Conquering Lion of the Tribe of Judah. There are trumpets, incense, priests, spear-wielding warriors. The story runs 14,000 words, with 83 images. If a ceremony in 1930 honoring a black man had taken place in America, instead of Ethiopia, you can pretty much guarantee there wouldn’t have been a story at all. Even worse, if Haile Selassie had lived in the United States, he would almost certainly have been denied entry to our lectures in segregated Washington, D.C., and he might not have been allowed to be a National Geographic member. According to Robert M. Poole, who wrote Explorers House: National Geographic and the World It Made, “African Americans were excluded from membership—at least in Washington—through the 1940s.” I’m the tenth editor of National Geographic since its founding in 1888. I’m the first woman and the first Jewish person—a member of two groups that also once faced discrimination here. It hurts to share the appalling stories from the magazine’s past. But when we decided to devote our April magazine to the topic of race, we thought we should examine our own history before turning our reportorial gaze to others. ..." To continue reading, visit the full letter from the editor on the National Geographic website. Goldberg, Susan. "For Decades, Our Coverage Was Racist. To Rise Above Our Past, We Must Acknowledge It." National Geographic Magazine (April 2018). <https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2018/04/from-the-editor-race-racism-history/>
by R. Rini Larson
Friday, March 16, 2018
Photos of Modern Vikings Keeping Their Traditions Alive 0 R. Rini Larson By Caisa Ederyd — "When the neo-Nazi group, the Nordic Resistance Movement in September 2017 tried to organize a march through Gothenburg, a city on the west coast of Sweden, Italian photographer Matteo Congregalli was on hand to document the event. But amongst the large crowd of counter-protesters, one specific group stood out to him—Vikings. The Vikings attending this counter-protest were there representing the network Vikingar Mot Rasism (Vikings Against Racism), whose members are out to show that you can cherish ancient national traditions without being a racist dickhead. After the march, Congregalli got in touch with some of the Vikings, who agreed to speak with him and let him document modern Viking culture—specifically in Skåne, Sweden's southernmost province, but also in Norway. Like many people would, Congregalli assumed that being a modern Viking would just entail some fake fighting in reenactments, but he quickly found out that it was a way of life. ..." To continue reading, visit the full article on Vice. Ederyd, Caisa. "Photos of Modern Vikings Keeping Their Traditions Alive." Vice (March 13, 2018). <https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/ywqn3j/photos-of-modern-vikings-keeping-their-traditions-alive>
by R. Rini Larson
Friday, March 16, 2018
Sudan Archives Makes a New Jig with the Help of West African Fiddling 0 R. Rini Larson By Brandi Fullwood —  "Sudan Archives has a funkier approach to violin. After taking a few lessons in Western classical styles and playing Irish jigs in fiddle club, she started experimenting. Sudan Archives researched West African and Sudanese fiddling styles and that’s where she draws her influence. There is a much more informal relationship with the instruments, and the style is much more candid and playful in West African fiddling than classical styles. In some recordings, it comes through as an almost industrial or full-texture sound. In a 1958 Smithsonian recording by anthropologist Stanley Diamond, this style is revealed on the ninth track. The recording is set up in sections that highlight different instruments. Three unnamed Tiv musicians sing as well as play the drums, bugle and fiddle. ..." To continue reading, visit the full article on the Public Radio International website. Fullwood, Brandi. "Sudan Archives Makes a New Jig with the Help of West African Fiddling." Public Radio International (March 7, 2018). <https://www.pri.org/stories/2018-03-07/sudan-archives-makes-new-jig-help-west-african-fiddling>
by R. Rini Larson
Wednesday, March 14, 2018
OSU Publishes Essay on Opera by AFS President Dorothy Noyes 0 R. Rini Larson AFS President Dorothy Noyes has penned an essay on the enduring allure of opera for The Ohio State University Obsession Story Series. Read about vengeful and lustful passions expressed through centuries of dramatic musical performance in a variety of national and international traditions below.   By Dorothy Noyes —  "For this series, we reach out to a member of the department who has a very particular obsession and ask them to share it with the world. In this edition, Professor Dorothy Noyes shares her fascination with opera. The mature passions begin in parody and pretense. In my case, with the best TV commercial of all time, with a helmeted Elmer Fudd chanting "Kill de wabbit!", and in due course with the Marx Brothers mangling Il Trovatore. Much as I learned about wine by imitating televisual wine snobs, I hooked myself on opera by bellowing "Figaro! Figaro! Figaro!" and improvising scenes of distracted love on the playground. Probably one should not uncover the ignoble beginnings of acquired tastes. But more important things came in the same way, through pretense and iteration: with time, I mastered languages by acting as if I spoke them, acquired political views by trying them out in argument and became a scholar by assembling books and papers around myself. Playing at alien practices gives you power over them, makes an effective investment that builds patience to wrestle with the strange. Massive middle-aged persons in heavy robes roaring of love and vengeance to orchestral accompaniment counted as strange, even in the European court environment that originated them. ..." To continue reading, visit the full article on The Ohio State University website. Noyes, Dorothy. "Obsession Story: Dorothy Noyes and Opera." The Ohio State University (March 5, 2018). <https://english.osu.edu/news/obsession-noyes>
by R. Rini Larson
Wednesday, March 14, 2018
Why Mariachi Music Matters in the Age of Trump 0 R. Rini Larson By David Montgomery —  "Here comes a troupe of mariachis, trying and failing to creep stealthily up the walk to a little house in a lost corner of Dumfries, Va. It’s a quarter past midnight and 10 degrees. Forgive them for being an hour late — they’ve been speeding from one gig to another all evening. Their mere arrival makes the neighborhood begin to seem not quite so frozen and silent. Is it the bravura of the tailored jackets, big-shouldered and so white they almost glow in the gloom? The sparkle and jangle of the silver-buttoned ornaments that run up the hems of their tight black pants? The gleam of their patent-leather boots? They tune their instruments on the fly as they reach the house. Pum pum, goes the guitarrón searching for its bass tone. Shhhhhhhhhh, says Antonio Celis, coming out to greet them. He wants to preserve the element of surprise until the last minute for his sister’s birthday party. Just inside the front room, Celis whispers his request for the first song. 'Listo!' say the mariachis: Ready! ..." To continue reading, visit the full article on the Washington Post website. Montgomery, David. "Why mariachi music matters in the age of Trump." The Washington Post (March 1, 2018). <https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/magazine/why-mariachi-music-matters-in-the-age-of-trump/2018/02/28/8c4a170e-0c31-11e8-95a5-c396801049ef_story.html?utm_term=.bb5fe4061941>
by R. Rini Larson
Friday, March 9, 2018
Why Is Smithsonian Folkways Putting Out a Rap Album? 0 R. Rini Larson By Glenn Dixon —  "Washington’s most impressive record collection sits on the second floor of a blocky office building on Maryland Avenue near the Mall. Lined floor to ceiling with more than 13,000 old albums, the Smithsonian Folkways archive is a record fiend’s dream—an invaluable trove of fascinating sounds from around the country and the world. Though this collection is part of the Smithsonian Institution, it’s not a museum. Rather, it’s a working record company, albeit one whose offices could quite easily lure tourists away from the actual museums a few blocks away. (It’s open to the public by appointment.) ..." To continue reading, visit the full article on the Washingtonian website. Dixon, Glenn. "Why Is Smithsonian Folkways Putting Out a Rap Album?" Washingtonian (March 1, 2018). <https://www.washingtonian.com/2018/03/01/smithsonian-folkways-rap-album-huib-schippers/>
by R. Rini Larson
Friday, March 2, 2018
Percy Grainger's Collection of Ethnographic Wax Cylinders 0 R. Rini Larson By Steve Roud —  "The British Library is pleased to make available online around 350 English folk songs recorded by composer Percy Grainger in different regions of England between 1906 and 1909. Thanks to the generous support of the National Folk Music Fund, these sound recordings have been catalogued and indexed by librarian, researcher and folklorist Steve Roud, author of Folk Song in England (Faber & Faber, 2017). Roud has also married them up with Grainger's transcriptions of the songs, where these exist, on the Vaughan Williams Memorial Library website, thanks to their digitisation of the Percy Grainger Manuscript Collection. Links have also been included on the Vaughan Williams Memorial Library website to corresponding sound recordings featured on Sounds. Listeners are thus able to hear the songs whilst following Grainger’s unique transcriptions of recordings by singers such as Joseph Taylor, Joseph Leaning, George Gouldthorpe, Charles Rosher, William Fishlock, Tom Roberts, Dean Robinson, and many more. All recordings have been catalogued to include Roud numbers (this number refers to songs listed in the online databases Folk Song Index and Broadside Index), Grainger’s Melody numbers, and the numerical references to the discs and wax cylinders these sound recordings existed on previously. ..." To continue reading, visit the full guest post on the British Library's Sound and Vision Blog. To play the Grainger recordings online, visit: https://sounds.bl.uk/World-and-traditional-music/Percy-Grainger-Collection. Roud, Steve. "Percy Grainger's Collection of Ethnographic Wax Cylinders." British Library Sound and Vision Blog (February 20, 2018). <http://blogs.bl.uk/sound-and-vision/2018/02/percy-grainger-ethnographic-wax-cylinders.html>
by R. Rini Larson
Wednesday, February 21, 2018
About That Song You’ve Heard, Kumbaya 0 R. Rini Larson By John Eligon —  "We chant it with locked arms and closed eyes, at campfires, in protest lines and from the pews at church, but the truth is, many of us have no clue what the lyrics mean or exactly where they come from. Kumbaya my Lord, kumbaya. Kumbaya my Lord, kumbaya. Thanks to research and lobbying by residents of a coastal community descended from slaves, the origins and meaning of 'Kumbaya' have been recognized in Congress, raising hopes that a fading culture might get a boost. The song may be sung more often than usual this month, especially in the part of Georgia where its soulful lyrics are said to have originated almost a century ago. Speaking on the House floor two months back, Representative Buddy Carter of Georgia recognized the Gullah Geechee, whose ancestors were brought to America’s southeastern coast from West Africa, as the probable creators of the famous folk song. ..." To continue reading—and to see AFS member Stephen Winick's research profiled—visit the full article on the New York Times website.  Eligon, John. "About That Song You’ve Heard, Kumbaya." The New York Times (February 9, 2018). <https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/09/us/kumbaya-gullah-geechee.html>
by R. Rini Larson
Wednesday, February 14, 2018
Making Sense of the Paranormal 0 R. Rini Larson By Diane Peters —  "Blinking orange lights cut across the night sky over Shag Harbour on October 4, 1967. Witnesses in the small Nova Scotia fishing village then saw what seemed to be an object crashing into the water. Fishermen and, later, authorities went out into the Atlantic to seek survivors. They saw some yellow foam bubbling on the water’s surface but no wreckage. Newspapers reported on this strange sighting, the government investigated, and soon enough the incident was nearly forgotten. Then, around the time of the new millennium, a few books and documentaries started to come out about “Canada’s Roswell” (a reference to an incident in Roswell, New Mexico in 1947 that conspiracy theorists believed was a UFO cover-up). Now, the legacy fuels a mini-economy: the town has the Shag Harbour Incident Interpretive Centre and holds an annual festival that draws UFO enthusiasts to revisit the strange story, and to talk of aliens and government complicity. ..." To continue reading, visit the full article on the University Affairs website. Peters, Diane. "Making Sense of the Paranormal." University Affairs (February 7, 2018). <https://www.universityaffairs.ca/features/feature-article/making-sense-paranormal/>
by R. Rini Larson
Monday, February 12, 2018
Songs Across Cultures 0 R. Rini Larson By Alissa Jordan —  "Do songs share certain forms across the world? If you hear a song sung in an unfamiliar language, in a rhythm you’ve never heard before, can you still understand what it means? In a just-published cross-cultural study of song carried out by the Natural History of Song Project, Samuel Mehr, Manvir Singh, and colleagues (2018) found that people across sixty countries were able to reliably infer whether songs were used for dancing, for soothing babies, or for healing the ill after listening to only 14-second sound bytes. One especially intriguing finding is that participants are able to recognize specific song forms even when they lack social or cultural familiarity with the song form altogether—such as listeners from Western industrial countries who still accurately and reliably determined that certain song fragments were intended for healing (rather than for soothing babies, facilitating dance, mourning the dead, expressing love, or “telling a story”). ..." To continue reading, visit the full article on the Human Relations Area Files website. Jordan, Alissa. "Songs Across Culture." Human Relations Area Files (January 27, 2018). <http://hraf.yale.edu/songs-across-cultures/>
by R. Rini Larson
Monday, February 12, 2018
Thinking Like a Folklorist: Not All or Nothing, but Something 0 R. Rini Larson By Maribel Alvarez —  “How do we know what we know? To make sense of the world, folklorists use methods borrowed in equal measures from the humanities and social sciences. Sometimes our work feels more interpretative than scientific. But this distinction can be misleading. Whether we’re listening for the ‘truth’ in a family anecdote, a rumor, or a song, or conducting a systematic study through observation, pattern-finding, and formal interviews, we folklorists try to interpret human behavior to gain understanding, respect, and collaboration. The calling card of a folklorist’s trade is the ethnographic interview (from Greek, ‘ethno’ for people and ‘grapho’ to report or document). Ethnography is the effort to learn about people by learning from people. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on the Southwest Folklife Alliance website. Alvarez, Maribel. "Thinking Like a Folklorist: Not All or Nothing, but Something." Southwest Folklife Alliance. <https://www.southwestfolklife.org/thinking-like-folklorist-not-nothing-something/>
by R. Rini Larson
Wednesday, January 31, 2018

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