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Skokie, Ill., Has Great Bagels—And An Even Better Story Behind Them 0 R. Rini Larson By Amanda Leigh Lichtenstein —  "When my mother passed away in Sarasota, Fla., my sisters and I had 48 hours to pack up her condo and book it back to our hometown of Skokie, Ill., for her funeral. Embarking on a road trip together across six states, we could only fixate on one thing: Kaufman's bagels and trays for the shiva (the Jewish tradition of seven days of mourning after burial). When it came to our mother's shiva, my sisters and I held a long-standing promise to invest in the best bagels and trays at all cost. There was just one problem: It was Passover, when Jews celebrate the great Exodus out of Egypt. As we careened toward our own personal Promised Land, we worried that Kaufman's, a famous 50-year-old kosher-style deli and Skokie institution on Dempster Street, would be closed for the holiday. After much begging and pleading over the phone, Kaufman's came through with its grand fish and deli meat trays featuring the finest Nova lox, thinly sliced corned beef, tuna salad, gefilte fish, chive cream cheese, herring, sturgeon, sable, egg salad, chopped liver, black olives and salty pickles. But according to Jewish law, Jews are not allowed to eat bread over Passover in honor of those who fled Egypt before their bread could rise, so Kaufman's put the kibosh on bagels, much to our dismay. As grieving daughters, the need for bagels as a comfort food at our mom's shiva trumped any sort of allegiance to the Jewish laws of Passover. Suddenly, we had a bagel crisis on our hands. ..." To continue reading, visit the full article on NPR.com. Lichtenstein, Amanda Leigh. "Skokie, Ill., Has Great Bagels—And An Even Better Story Behind Them." NPR.com (May 16, 2018). <https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2018/05/16/610244617/skokie-ill-has-great-bagels-and-an-even-better-story-behind-them>
by R. Rini Larson
Friday, May 18, 2018
Zora Neale Hurston’s Story of a Former Slave Finally Comes to Print 0 R. Rini Larson By Casey N. Cep —  "Captain William Foster left Mobile in secret and returned the same way. On July 8, 1860, he dropped anchor in the waters off the coast of Mississippi, hid his cargo below deck, slipped ashore, and travelled overland to fetch a tugboat from Alabama. By then, Foster and his ship had survived a hurricane, a mutiny, an ambush, and a transatlantic journey, but late that Sunday night, after the tug carried him up the Mobile River to Twelve Mile Island, the Captain emptied his hold, dismissed his crew, and set fire to his ship. The Clotilda, Foster would forever after complain, was worth more than his share of what it had smuggled. Although the international slave trade had been outlawed in America more than half a century earlier, Foster and three co-conspirators, a trio of brothers by the name of Meaher, had purchased a hundred and twenty-five men, women, and children, from Benin and Nigeria, to traffic them into the United States. The plan had been hatched a year before, when one of the Meahers got into an argument: a New Yorker insisted that slaves could no longer be transported across the Atlantic, a Louisiana planter wagered a hundred dollars that it could be done, and Timothy Meaher bet a thousand that he could be the one to do it. The market for slaves had grown tremendously in the previous five decades. Absent imports, slavers relied on reproduction and relocation for their supply, and, as labor-intensive agriculture shifted to the Deep South, more than a million enslaved people were forced there by ship, rail, and sometimes by foot, in coffles. By the middle of the nineteenth century, domestic slave prices were so high that many planters had begun lobbying to reopen the global trade. ..." To continue reading, visit the full article on The New Yorker's website. Cep, Casey N. “Zora Neale Hurston’s Story of a Former Slave Finally Comes to Print.” The New Yorker (May 7, 2018).<https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2018/05/14/zora-neale-hurstons-story-of-a-former-slave-finally-comes-to-print/amp>
by R. Rini Larson
Friday, May 18, 2018
Folkloristics Spotlighted in World's Foremost Climbing Journal 0 R. Rini Larson Brad Rassler (Sustainable Play, Founder and Editor-in-Chief) has written the cover story for Alpinist Magazine, Issue 61 (Spring 2018) about mountaineering’s folkloric tradition as applied to one of the sport’s most colorful characters, the late Fred Beckey. Rassler quotes AFS members Lynne McNeill (Utah State University), and Spencer Green (Penn State Harrisburg) in this article, along with invoking the work of Alan Dundes.   To quote briefly from the article: "When he died last October, Fred Beckey, often referred to as the ‘indomitable,’ left behind an unprecedented legacy of first ascents across North America, as well as a legend shaped by decades of lore from all who encountered him in the mountains."   To purchase the issue online, visit: https://shop.holpublications.com/products/alpinist-magazine-issue-61. To purchase the app/digital edition, visit: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/alpinist-magazine/id566714955.  
by R. Rini Larson
Saturday, May 12, 2018
Every Culture Appropriates 0 R. Rini Larson  By David Frum — “Meet the Death Metal Cowboys of Botswana. In black leather decorated with metal studs, they play a pounding style of music that people who know more than me trace to the British band ‘Venom’ and its 1981 album Welcome to Hell. Question: Is this cultural appropriation? Why or why not? The question is inspired by a spasm of social-media cruelty that caught wide attention last week. A young woman in Utah bought a Chinese-style dress to wear to her high school formal. She posted some photographs of herself on her personal Instagram page—and suddenly found herself the target of virulent online abuse. For once, the story has a happy ending. Good sense and kindness prevailed, and instead of her prom being ruined, the young woman exited the dance buoyed by worldwide support and affirmation, most of all from within China. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on The Atlantic’s website. Frum, David. “Every Culture Appropriates.” The Atlantic (May 8, 2018). <https://www.theatlantic.com/amp/article/559802/>  
by R. Rini Larson
Saturday, May 12, 2018
On a Hill in Alabama, the Lynched Haunt Us 0 R. Rini Larson By Jamil Smith —  “Drive along Interstate 65 in central Alabama between Birmingham and Montgomery, you can't miss it. Some folks who call themselves the Sons of Confederate Veterans put up a massive Confederate flag, colors as bright as if it were brand new. The flag doesn't just remind you that you're in the Deep South. It makes you remember that ‘remember’ is a verb. We memorialize deliberately, and with particular goals in mind. In and around Montgomery, the former ‘cradle of the Confederacy,’ you are surrounded by signs of hatred and treason. One could regard the new Legacy Museum and National Memorial for Peace and Justice, dedicated to the thousands of African American lynching victims since the Civil War, this same way, arguing that commemorating the victims of a heinous crime dregs up tensions and nothing else. The past is best left in the past, they say. (Some in Montgomery have already said as much.) But if that's the case, as Equal Justice Initiative and new memorial founder Bryan Stevenson remarked, why does Montgomery have 59 markers and monuments to the Confederacy within its city limits? ‘I think we've done a terrible job of talking about our history of racial inequality, and our silence about that history has left us vulnerable to a lot of the problems that we have today,’ Stevenson told me last week during the memorial's opening weekend. ‘And we're going to have to create a new America.’ …” To continue reading, visit the full article on Rolling Stone's website.  Smith, Jamil. “On a Hill in Alabama, the Lynched Haunt Us.” Rolling Stone (May 6, 2018). <https://www.rollingstone.com/politics/features/national-lynching-memorial-w519526>
by R. Rini Larson
Saturday, May 12, 2018
At 70, Smithsonian Folkways Is An Antidote To Music Algorithms 0 R. Rini Larson By NPR — “From the sounds of blues guitarist and singer Lead Belly to recordings of Southwestern Woodhouse Toads, Smithsonian Folkways has been capturing the sounds of global history for the past 70 years. These recordings are among 60,000 treasured tracks the label has in its library — and it promises they'll never go out of print — from the labor songs of Woody Guthrie and children's songs of Ella Jenkins to New Orleans hot jazz, songs of the civil rights movement, the Honk Horn music of Ghana and so much more. The label was officially started on May Day 1948, so its current director and curator, Huib Schippers, joins us to look back and celebrate this National Treasure's rich history, starting with its founder Moses Asch. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on NPR.com. Visit the Smithsonian's online exhibit "70 Years 70 Stories" on the Smithsonian Folkways Recordings website.   “At 70, Smithsonian Folkways Is An Antidote To Music Algorithms.” NPR.com (May 1, 2018). <https://www.npr.org/sections/allsongs/2018/05/01/607172246/at-70-smithsonian-folkways-is-an-antidote-to-music-algorithms>
by R. Rini Larson
Saturday, May 12, 2018
Did Armenia Just Dance Its Way to Revolution? 0 R. Rini Larson By Amie Ferris-Rotman —  “Ousting your prime minister can be seriously hard work. But it should be fun, too. That is the impression Armenia gave in recent weeks, where hundreds of thousands staged anti-government rallies, part of a bloodless revolution in the small country that managed to throw off -- at least, so far -- authoritarian rule. And when the people in the country of 3 million were not blocking highways, going on strike and waving the tricolor Armenian flag, they were engaged in an activity altogether unassociated with revolution: dancing. Since charismatic opposition leader Nikol Pashinyan began the protests in mid-April, the Armenian capital, Yerevan, has been engulfed in carnivalesque street parties, filled with mostly young people rebelling against what they saw as a corrupt, ruling elite. Their pro-democracy movement managed to force Serzh Sargsyan to step down as prime minister, after more than a decade in power. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on the Washington Post's website. Ferris-Rotman, Amie. “Did Armenia Just Dance Its Way to Revolution?” The Washington Post (May 3, 2018). <https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2018/05/03/did-armenia-just-dance-its-way-to-revolution/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.997bb68cc643&wpisrc=nl_most&wpmm=1>
by R. Rini Larson
Friday, May 11, 2018
Boko Haram Huntress 0 R. Rini Larson by Rosie Collyer — “Since the dawn of humanity, hunters have roamed the forests and savannahs of Africa. Fast forward to the 21st century, and there is no big game left in northeastern Nigeria. Artillery fire exchanged between Boko Haram fighters and the Nigerian military has scared the animals away. Now, hunters track and capture rebel fighters. Feared for their superior tracking skills and their belief in the supernatural, they help the military hunt down Boko Haram. With little or no money from the authorities, hunters rely on locally made weapons to fight a heavily armed enemy. Boko Haram, whose name roughly translates to "Western education is forbidden", has waged a 10-year armed campaign to create an Islamic state in northeastern Nigeria. The group has killed tens of thousands, displaced 2.3 million from their homes, and is ranked among the world's deadliest armed groups. Chief among the hunters is Aisha Bakari Gombi. She is the "Queen Hunter", a title given to her for bravery on the battlefield. Aisha and her band of hunters defend their communities. Boko Haram's camps are in the forests and mountains where Aisha went hunting with her father as a child. ..." To continue reading, visit the full article on the Al Jazeera website. Collyer, Rosie. "Boko Haram Huntress." Al Jazeera (April 17, 2018). <https://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/inpictures/boko-haram-huntress-180410112841843.html>
by R. Rini Larson
Tuesday, April 24, 2018
Dynamic Duo Bill and Marcie Cohen Ferris to Retire 0 R. Rini Larson Kim Weaver Spurr —  "On a cold morning last fall, professors Bill Ferris and Marcie Cohen Ferris were sitting in the cozy kitchen of their downtown Chapel Hill home, reflecting on being recruited to Carolina in 2002. Mugs of coffee and plates of homemade blueberry bread helped to keep the conversation flowing, with periodic interruptions from dogs Roper and Albe, who were playing at their feet. The kitchen is often the spot for end-of-class gatherings. Note the directions given to students: 'We have two exuberant white labs who are over-the-top with energy and love. Be prepared for uncontrollable jumping and face-licking.' In 2001, Bill, an authority on Southern literature, folklore and blues music and an accomplished documentary photographer/filmmaker, had just finished a four-year stint as chair of the National Endowment for the Humanities, appointed by President Bill Clinton. Marcie, a scholar of food studies, Jewish studies and material culture, was wrapping up a Ph.D. in American studies at George Washington University. ..." To continue reading, visit the full article on the Carolina Arts and Sciences website. Weaver Spurr, Kim. "Dynamic Duo." Carolina Arts and Sciences (March 19, 2018). <http://magazine.college.unc.edu/2018/03/dynamic-duo/>
by R. Rini Larson
Monday, April 23, 2018
Dry, the Beloved Country 0 R. Rini Larson Eve Fairbanks —  "When I moved to South Africa nine years ago, one of the first things some locals told me was to be careful using GPS. The country had rules of navigation, they told me, but ones more complicated and intuitive than a computer could manage. You could drive through this neighborhood, but not at night. You could drive through that one, but roll up your windows, especially if you are white. It was often white South Africans who talked about the GPS, but many black South Africans agreed. It was sad, everybody would say; sad that the once-segregated country seemed not to have fully gotten over its past. But that was the way it was. Those were the rules. Some had come to think of them, painfully, as a fact of nature, of the human race. I thought of these rules when I flew into Cape Town, South Africa’s second-largest city, in March. Over the last three years, Cape Town has been suffering an extraordinary, once-in-300-years drought—helped along, most analysts surmise, by climate change. The shift in the city’s physical appearance is astonishing. The Cape is cordoned off from the rest of the country by a 5,000-foot-high wall of mountains. To the northeast, the landscape looks like the Africa of safari brochures: dry, hot and then jungly. But in the little bowl-shaped area couched between the mountain range and the southwestern tip of the African continent, the climate is exceptional. Its technical name is “Mediterranean.” To look out from the peaks toward Cape Town, a city of 4 million distinguished by genteel architecture and craggy slopes, has traditionally been like glimpsing Greece, if Greece were even dreamier: ivory houses, cobalt sea, olive hills, all threaded through by ribbons of gold and twinkles of topaz from wine farms. Fed by five times more rainfall than South Africa’s arid central region, the Cape area is one of the most diverse floral kingdoms on Earth, boasting giant blush-colored blooms. Cloud formations, from billowing white cumulonimbus to fogs that flow like rivers to mists that course like waterfalls off the top of Table Mountain, the crag that looms over the city, make heaven seem almost like a real place here, as playful and richly landscaped as the earth below. ..." To continue reading, visit the full piece on the Huffington Post website. Fairbanks, Eve. "Dry, the Beloved Country." Huffington Post (April 19, 2018). <https://highline.huffingtonpost.com/articles/en/cape-town-drought/?ncid=newsltushpmgnews__TheMorningEmail__042018>
by R. Rini Larson
Monday, April 23, 2018
For War Refugees, Bedsheets Are a Reminder of Home 0 R. Rini Larson By Nina Strochlic —  "On her first day in the sprawling South Sudanese settlement of Bidibidi in Uganda, home to almost 300,000 refugees, Swedish-German photographer Nora Lorek approached a woman and asked what she’d brought from home. 'Nothing,' she replied, 'except for some clothes wrapped in my bedsheet.' Lorek scribbled, 'bedsheet???' in her notebook. Civil war between the north and south has plagued Sudan on and off since the 1950s. In 2011, South Sudan separated from Sudan and became the world’s newest country. Soon after, in 2013, a power struggle erupted between leaders, and the country plunged into civil war. There were periods of quiet, but in 2016, on the eve of the fifth anniversary of independence, a peace deal fell apart and war resumed. Every day thousands of refugees streamed across the border into Uganda, where they’re allowed to work, farm, and go to school. For some it was their second, third, or fourth time fleeing home. Bidibidi soon became one of the world’s largest refugee settlements. In August 2017 the millionth refugee arrived since fighting started in 2013. Uganda has one of the world’s more progressive refugee policies, but the number of new arrivals threatened to strain its hospitality. ..." To continue reading, visit the full article on the National Geographic website. Strochlic, Nina. "For War Refugees, Bedsheets Are a Reminder of Home." National Geographic (May 2018). <https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2018/05/proof-photography-refugees-uganda-bidibidi-south-sudan/?beta=true>
by R. Rini Larson
Monday, April 23, 2018
Sister Rosetta Tharpe Gets Her Day in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame 0 R. Rini Larson Bruce Warren —  "Sister Rosetta Tharpe's electric gospel sound was crucial in paving the way for rock and roll, and the late singer and guitarist is finally getting her day at the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland. She joins this a class of inductees that includes big-name rock bands like Bon Jovi, Dire Straits and The Cars. Rosetta Tharpe was a huge star in her time. Born in a small town in Arkansas in 1915, she was raised in the Pentecostal church. Tharpe honed her musical talent at tent revivals and churches, but found fame after moving to New York City in the 1930s. Her electric sanctified sound was an overnight sensation in the city's nightclubs, and secular audiences fell in love with her ecstatic guitar playing. ..." To continue reading, visit the full article on the NPR website. Warren, Bruce. "Sister Rosetta Tharpe Gets Her Day in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame." NPR (April 12, 2018). <https://www.npr.org/sections/world-cafe/2018/04/12/601808069/sister-rosetta-tharpe-gets-her-day-in-the-rock-roll-hall-of-fame>
by R. Rini Larson
Monday, April 23, 2018
Denmark Asks Unesco to Give 'Hygge' World Heritage Status 0 R. Rini Larson By Hugh Morris —  “Denmark has applied for the art of hygge—its own brand of everyday happiness—to be inscribed on the Unesco list of 'intangible cultural heritage', protecting it for generations as an essential and historic part of global society. The wellness trend—pronounced ‘hoo-gah’—made waves in 2015, broadly embodying the Danes’ ability to appear constantly relaxed and refreshed, and spawning a fury of coffee table books, pub A-boards and self-help articles. Last year, hygge, which is credited as the reason Denmark is regularly polled as one of the happiest nations on the planet, was shortlisted as the Oxford English Dictionary’s most influential word of 2016, losing out, perhaps tellingly, to post-truth. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on The Telegraph's website. Morris, Hugh. “Denmark Asks Unesco to Give 'Hygge' World Heritage Status.” The Telegraph (April 12, 2018). <https://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/destinations/europe/denmark/articles/hygge-unesco-intangible-cultural-heritage-list/amp/>  
by R. Rini Larson
Wednesday, April 18, 2018
The Chinese Workers Who Assemble Designer Bags in Tuscany 0 R. Rini Larson By D. T. Max —  “The first significant wave of Chinese immigrants arrived in the industrial zone around Prato, a city fifteen miles northwest of Florence, in the nineteen-nineties. Nearly all of them came from Wenzhou, a port city south of Shanghai. For the Chinese, the culture shock was more modest than one might have expected. ‘The Italians were friendly,’ one early arrival remembered. ‘Like the Chinese, they called one another Uncle. They liked family.’ In Tuscany, business life revolved around small, interconnected firms, just as it did in Wenzhou, a city so resolutely entrepreneurial that it had resisted Mao’s collectivization campaign. The Prato area was a hub for mills and workshops, some of which made clothes and leather goods for the great fashion houses. If you were willing to be paid off the books, and by the piece, Prato offered plenty of opportunities. Many Wenzhouans found jobs there. ‘The Italians, being canny, would subcontract out their work to the Chinese,’ Don Giovanni Momigli, a priest whose parish, near Prato, included an early influx of Chinese, told me. ‘Then they were surprised when the Chinese began to do the work on their own.’ …” To continue reading, visit the full article on The New Yorker website. Max, D. T. "The Chinese Workers Who Assemble Designer Bags in Tuscany." The New Yorker (April 16, 2018). <https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2018/04/16/the-chinese-workers-who-assemble-designer-bags-in-tuscany>
by R. Rini Larson
Wednesday, April 18, 2018
A Supersized Music Modernization ‘Mega-Act’ Being Introduced Into Congress 0 R. Rini Larson By Daniel Sanchez —   “Rep. Bob Goodlatte (R-VA), along with seven other sponsors, are now introducing the long-awaited Music Modernization Act.  Only this time, with a few notable changes and several key provisions and proposals from other legislative efforts.  The bill is expected to have markups finalized Wednesday, and move into the broader House of Representatives. So forget about the old Music Modernization Act.  Because this one is getting seriously super-sized. The new Music Modernization Act combines proposals from four individual legislative efforts into a single bill.  As before, the bill aims to transform how mechanical royalties are collected.  But the new legislative effort now contains provisions from the controversial CLASSICS Act.  It also contains parts from the Allocation for Music Producers (AMP) Act, the Fair Play Fair Pay Act, and a songwriter-specific version of the original Music Modernization Act. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on the Digital Music News website. Sanchez, Daniel. "A Supersized Music Modernization ‘Mega-Act’ Is Being Introduced Into Congress." Digital Music News (April 10, 2018). <https://www.digitalmusicnews.com/2018/04/10/groundbreaking-music-modernization-act/>
by R. Rini Larson
Wednesday, April 18, 2018
Watch Barbara Hillers' Lecture "Folktales and Reality" on Youtube 0 R. Rini Larson Dr. Barbara Hillers (University College Dublin) gave a lecture titled "Folktales and Reality: Ireland's Rural Laborer and the Social Contract in The Master’s Good Counsels (ATU 910B)" at Indiana University (IU) on February 8, 2018. Watch it on the IU Department of Folklore and Ethnomusicology Youtube Channel at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2LtU-mwj5aU&t=3239s.   Lecture Abstract: The hero of The Master’s Good Counsels is a migrant laborer, forced to leave his home to make a living elsewhere; after many adventures, he is finally reunited with his wife and child. This international folktale exhibits a high degree of  social realism and is particularly popular in countries where rural poverty and migrant labor were widespread like Ireland. The tale offers invaluable insights into Irish social history and material culture and, above all, expresses the storytellers' hope for a better life and a more equitable social contract.   Bio: Barbara Hillers holds a tenured faculty position in Irish Folklore at University College Dublin; she has previously taught at Harvard and at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland. Her publications are in the areas of folk narrative and song in Ireland and Scotland, the role of gender in song tradition, and medieval and modern continuities in Gaelic literature. She is the co-editor of Child's Children: Ballad Study and its Legacies (2012), and Charms, Charmers and Charming in Ireland (forthcoming). Her more recent research areas include children's folklore, healing charms, and magic.
by R. Rini Larson
Wednesday, April 18, 2018
Are Lithuanians Obsessed with Bees? 0 R. Rini Larson  By Will Mawhood —  "In mid-January, the snow made the little coastal town of Šventoji in north-west Lithuania feel like a film set. Restaurants, shops and wooden holiday cabins all sat silently with their lights off, waiting for the arrival of spring. I found what I was looking for on the edge of the town, not far from the banks of the iced-over Šventoji river and within earshot of the Baltic Sea: Žemaitiu alka, a shrine constructed by the Lithuanian neo-pagan organisation Romuva. Atop a small hillock stood 12 tall, thin, slightly tapering wooden figures. The decorations are austere but illustrative: two finish in little curving horns; affixed to the top of another is an orb emitting metal rays. One is adorned with nothing but a simple octagon. I looked down to the words carved vertically into the base and read ‘Austėja’. Below it was the English word: ‘bees’. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on the BBC website. Mawhood, Will. "Are Lithuanians Obsessed with Bees?" BBC - Travel (March 20, 2018). <http://www.bbc.com/travel/story/20180319-are-lithuanians-obsessed-with-bees>
by R. Rini Larson
Tuesday, April 17, 2018
Denmark Gets First Public Statue of a Black Woman, a ‘Rebel Queen’ 0 R. Rini Larson By Martin Selsoe Sorenson —  “COPENHAGEN — The statue of the woman is nearly 23 feet tall. Her head is wrapped and she stares straight ahead while sitting barefoot, but regally, in a wide-backed chair, clutching a torch in one hand and a tool used to cut sugar cane in the other. In Denmark, where most of the public statues represent white men, two artists on Saturday unveiled the striking statue in tribute to a 19th-century rebel queen who had led a fiery revolt against Danish colonial rule in the Caribbean. They said it was Denmark’s first public monument to a black woman. The sculpture was inspired by Mary Thomas, known as one of “the three queens.” Thomas, along with two other female leaders, unleashed an uprising in 1878 called the “Fireburn.” Fifty plantations and most of the town of Frederiksted in St. Croix were burned, in what has been called the largest labor revolt in Danish colonial history. …" To continue reading, visit the full article on The New York Times website. Sorenson, Martin Selsoe. "Denmark Gets First Public Statue of a Black Woman, a ‘Rebel Queen.’" The New York Times (March 31, 2018). <https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/31/world/europe/denmark-statue-black-woman.html>
by R. Rini Larson
Tuesday, April 17, 2018
Amid Rapid Change, Blue-Collar Astoria Pauses for Poetry 0 R. Rini Larson By Knute Berger and Matt M. McKnight —  "ASTORIA, Ore. — It was a gathering that drew us to Astoria, just where U.S. Highway 101 crosses into Oregon from Washington. Route 101 snakes its way along the West Coast from California to Washington state. In our state, it finally moves away from the shoreline and loops like a boathook around the Olympic Mountains back down Hood Canal and ends in Tumwater, onetime terminus for the Oregon Trail. The highway is famous for its scenery and stretches that can induce carsickness with its curves and dips. It’s also known as a road that reflects the culture, history and differing communities and political viewpoints of our state. For the beginning of an occasional series on the people and places along Highway 101, Crosscut photojournalist Matt M. McKnight and I decided to start in Astoria at the mouth of the Columbia River. ..." To continue reading, visit the full article on the The Crosscut website. Berger, Knute and Matt M. McKnight. "Amid Rapid Change, Blue-Collar Astoria Pauses for Poetry." The Crosscut (March 30, 2018). <https://crosscut.com/2018/03/amid-rapid-change-blue-collar-astoria-pauses-poetry>
by R. Rini Larson
Tuesday, April 17, 2018
Move Over, Brisket. There Are Fresher Foods 'Too Good To Passover' 0 R. Rini Larson By Deena Prichep —  "Passover is a holiday celebrating the Jews' exodus from slavery — and also a broader embrace of the coming spring, of fresh green shoots both literal and metaphorical. But the menu? More often than not, in America, you're talking stodgy winter foods like gefilte fish and brisket, seasoned (if at all) with heavy aromatics. These aren't dishes that point to the coming spring. They're dishes that come from the root cellar. That's because the majority of American Jews are Ashkenazim, with roots in chilly Eastern Europe. But cookbook writer and culinary instructor Jennifer Abadi's family (and family recipes) came from Syria. Growing up, Seder meals involved lamb shanks and lemony soup with rice and meatballs. And after teaching cooking classes where students were hungry for these sunnier flavors, she began collecting recipes from other Sephardic and Judeo-Arabic first-generation families, preserving both the dishes and the stories behind them. ..." To continue reading, visit the full article on NPR.com. Prichep, Deena. "Move Over, Brisket. There Are Fresher Foods 'Too Good To Passover.'" NPR (March 29, 2018). <https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2018/03/29/597127739/move-over-brisket-there-are-fresher-foods-too-good-to-passover>
by R. Rini Larson
Friday, March 30, 2018

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