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Folklorist Andrea Kitta Creates Instructional Video about the Supernatural 0 B. Bridges .FormTable1 td {color: #000 !important;} Ever wondered how folklorists approach questions about the supernatural? If so, check out belief scholar Andrea Kitta's latest video on her Twitter feed and YouTube account in which she explains how folklorists tend to approach questions of truth and reality when studying supernatural topics. The tweet can be found here: https://twitter.com/AndreaKitta/status/1304129122977841152 The YouTube video, which is embedded within the tweet, can be viewed separately here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jp99wpsr-bU
by B. Bridges
20 hours ago
Estonia’s ‘holy forests’ threatened by demand for biofuels 0 B. Bridges .FormTable1 td {color: #000 !important;} By Saul Elbein-- "In the decades after independence [from Soviet forces], Scandinavian investment and logistical support poured in, and Estonians driving the country’s highways began to see harvester machines on the edge of the forests, plucking trees like daisies. In their place have come evenly spaced rows of fir and spruce planted for the global market, a replacement of the forest with something far simpler and more profitable, as Estonian ecologist Asko Lõhmus has said.'You can plant trees,' Lõhmus says, 'but you can’t plant a forest.; In that distinction lurks a world of debate over the global future of forestry: will natural forests be allowed to follow their own destiny—as in the traditional Estonian model—or will landscapes be bent to the will of the commodities market. So far, it’s been the second. ..." To continue reading, see: Saul Elbein, "Estonia's 'holy forests' threatened by demand for biofuels," National Geographic (August 24, 2020): https://api.nationalgeographic.com/distribution/public/amp/science/2020/08/estonia-holy-forests-threatened-by-industrial-tree-farming
by B. Bridges
Monday, August 31, 2020
Ballots and Ballads: New Mexican Corridistas Keep "La Votación" Alive 0 K. Brooke .FormTable1 td {color: #000 !important;} Carmella Scorcia Pacheco has written a piece on the inequalities of women's suffrage titled, "Ballots and Ballads: New Mexican Corridistas Keep "La Votación" Alive," which is featured in the August 21, 2020, issue of the BorderLore E-Newsletter.   See: Carmella Scorcia Pacheco, "Ballots and Ballads: New Mexican Corridistas Keep "La Votación" Alive," BorderLore: https://borderlore.org/ballots-and-ballads-new-mexican-corridistas-keep-la-votacion-alive/. 
by K. Brooke
Monday, August 24, 2020
Digital Black Music History Library 0 K. Brooke .FormTable1 td {color: #000 !important;} Jenzia Burgos, a music journalist, has started a digital Black Music History Library. For more information, see the library webpage.  
by K. Brooke
Monday, August 24, 2020
Online Database Contains 5,000 Historical Cookbooks 0 K. Brooke .FormTable1 td {color: #000 !important;} The Sifter, a cookbook database, catalogues over a thousand years of cookbooks including the Latin, De Re Culinaria, which was published in 800 and The Romance of Candy published in 1938.   See: Reina Gattuso, "A Database of 5,000 Historical Cookbooks is Now Online, and You Can Help Improve It," Atlas Obscura: https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/how-to-find-historic-cookbooks  
by K. Brooke
Monday, August 17, 2020
Southern Cultures 2020 “Art & Vision” Issue 0 K. Brooke .FormTable1 td {color: #000 !important;} The Southern Cultures journal recently released its Summer 2020 "Art & Vision" issue, which highlights the avenues of art and creativity as being both innovative and connective channels. For more information, see: Southern Cultures.
by K. Brooke
Tuesday, August 11, 2020
How the 1918 Pandemic Got Meme-ified in Jokes, Songs and Poems 0 B. Bridges .FormTable1 td {color: #000 !important;} "In newspapers across the country, the public dealt with the heartache of the moment by turning to humor." See: Katherine A. Foss, "How the 1918 Pandemic Got Meme-ified in Jokes, Songs and Poems," Smithsonian Magazine: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/memes-1918-pandemic-180975452/ 
by B. Bridges
Monday, August 10, 2020
Irish Broadside Ballads Online Exhibition at the Irish National Archives 0 K. Brooke .FormTable1 td {color: #000 !important;} The Irish National Archives has an online collection of ballads and political verses from the 1820s –1830s titled, “Singing Sedition: ballads and verse in the age of O’Connell.” For more information, see the exhibition’s webpage. 
by K. Brooke
Wednesday, August 5, 2020
San Antonio Muralism 0 K. Brooke .FormTable1 td {color: #000 !important;} San Antonio artists highlight the region by painting murals to pay homage to the city’s culture. See: Elda Silva, "Meet the Muralistas: Outdoor Artists Tap into San Antonio's Cultural DNA," San Antonio Current: https://m.sacurrent.com/ArtSlut/archives/2020/07/28/meet-the-muralistas-outdoor-artists-tap-into-san-antonios-cultural-dna  
by K. Brooke
Wednesday, August 5, 2020
Your Favorite Folktale (pre-20th Century) 0 L. Kope Hi!  As my children grow, I'm very interested in providing them with age-appropriate folktales from around the world, from all different time periods.  I thought, what better starting point than to ask this community?I'm just looking for 1-3 stories that are your absolute favorite, for whatever reason.  Bonus if you can link me to a version you like.Thank you!
by L. Kope
Tuesday, August 4, 2020
Complexities and Controversies Concerning the Term "Latinx" 0 K. Brooke .FormTable1 td {color: #000 !important;} See: Rachel Hatzipanagos, “‘Latinx’: An offense to the Spanish language or a nod to inclusion?,” The Washington Post: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-nation/wp/2018/09/14/latinx-an-offense-to-the-spanish-language-or-a-nod-to-inclusion/ See: Kurly Tlapoyawa, “Can We Please Stop Using ‘Latinx’? Thanx.,” Medium: https://humanparts.medium.com/can-we-please-stop-using-latinx-thanx-423ac92a87dc See: John McWhorter, “Why Latinx Can’t Catch On,” The Atlantic: https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2019/12/why-latinx-cant-catch-on/603943/?gclid=CjwKCAjw34n5BRA9EiwA2u9k3zfd477tXxIISVYT_6vr3tjvhSaSWjbZUM6-jOG1OmnI8sRST2qAERoC7RYQAvD_BwEThe Publore community has discussed this term this week; to find the archive and more information about the Publore listserv, see https://www.afsnet.org/page/OnlineCommunities.  
by K. Brooke
Monday, August 3, 2020
What’s royalty got to do with folk music? 0 K. Brooke .FormTable1 td {color: #000 !important;} By Helen Brown-- “This place feels very important, but I don’t know why yet,” said Billy Bragg, wandering into Cecil Sharp House in 1986. Many of us have felt something similar, slipping from busy north London, though the English country garden, into the UK’s first dedicated folk arts centre. First opened in 1930, the building holds all the tension of the 20th century’s battles over the definition of “folk music” and who it belongs to. Visitors will feel it in the architectural push-pull between blunt, right-angled utilitarianism (formal rectangular halls for dancing, rectangular windows for light) and mystical curves of wooden carvings of green men, dragons and bawdy Morris men. For at Cecil Sharp House (CHS), town meets country, academia jostles with vernacular tradition and all three classes collide. …” To continue reading, see: Helen Brown, “‘What’s royalty got to do with folk music?’ – The amazing story of Cecil Sharp House,” The Independent: https://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/music/features/cecil-sharp-house-folk-music-arts-centre-shirley-collins-peggy-seeger-a9634281.html?amp 
by K. Brooke
Friday, July 31, 2020
Breaking Down The Legacy Of Race In Traditional Music In America 0 K. Brooke .FormTable1 td {color: #000 !important;} By Sophia Alvarez Boyd-- “The symbols of America's racist past have been under intense scrutiny since the protests against police brutality erupted nationwide. The confederate flag and other monuments from that era have been disappearing from public spaces — both by force and legislation. But what about the stereotypes and racist imagery in America's musical legacy? The traditional music community is reckoning with some of the songs from its past that are kept alive today through festivals and concerts. For Jake Blount, one musician leading that effort, his love for traditional music started with the banjo. …” To continue reading, see: Sophia Alvarez Boyd, “Breaking Down The Legacy Of Race In Traditional Music In America,” NPR (July 25, 2020): https://www.npr.org/2020/07/25/895112760/breaking-down-the-legacy-of-race-in-traditional-music-in-america 
by K. Brooke
Tuesday, July 28, 2020
Though museums are closed, the work continues 0 K. Brooke .FormTable1 td {color: #000 !important;} By Manisha Aggarwal-Schifellite-- "In the days since the pandemic sent Harvard's museum online, many have been sharing their offerings with the public through virtual tours, talks, and gallery displays.   But behind the scenes, staff members from across the network have pivoted from their normal duties in curation, collections management, and conservation to the enormous task of updating, adding, and editing data for millions of items housed in University collections, efforts that will prove invaluable for those doing research in them. ..." To continue reading, see:  Manisha Aggarwal-Schifellite, "Though museums are closed, the work continues," The Harvard Gazette (June 3, 2020): https://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2020/06/harvard-museums-tackle-database-updates-improvements/ 
by K. Brooke
Tuesday, July 21, 2020
Singapore's traditions in today's world 0 A. Sanchez .FormTable1 td {color: #000 !important;} By Ken Tan-- "Singapore today runs rich with cultural practices and traditions brought over by its forefathers from across the region, including China, India and the Malay Archipelago. These traditions have since taken on new forms, adapting though the hands of a new generation of cultural custodians to stay relevant in the modern world. Tradition meets the present with the Bhumi Collective, where producers, artists, and researchers come together to tell stories through theater and dance. ' We adapt traditional Malay dance philosophies into theater to create narratives that reflect contemporary issues,' explains Amin, one of Bhumi Collective's artistic directors.  ..." To continue reading, see: Ken Tan, "Singapore's traditions in today's world," National Geographic: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel/destinations/asia/singapore/partner-content-Singapores-traditions-in-todays-world/  
by A. Sanchez
Tuesday, July 21, 2020
Spectacular flower crowns rule in Ukraine 0 A. Sanchez By Eve Conant-- "Flowers, feathers, hemp threads, shells, beads, even pieces of foil and wax–these are just a few of the items that Ukrainian artist Dominika Dyka weaves into her modern re-creations of the traditional Ukrainian vinok (wreath or crown). Worn for centuries by girls and young women to symbolize purity and fertility—and a mainstay at festivals and weddings—the wreaths are believed to have pagan origins that predate the introduction of Christianity to the Eastern Slavic world in the 10th century. Today, however, they are part of a resurgence of traditional culture that Ukrainians are embracing in daily life—modernized with both a proud history and a bright future in mind. ..." To continue reading, see: Eve Conant. "Spectacular flower crowns rule in Ukraine." National Geographic July 6, 2020: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel/destinations/europe/ukraine/spectacular-flower-crowns-rule/#close
by A. Sanchez
Monday, July 13, 2020
Where Did BIPOC Come From? 0 A. Sanchez By Sandra E. Garcia-- "Black Americans have been called by many names in the United States. African-American, Negro, colored and the unutterable slur that rhymes with bigger. In recent weeks, as protests against police brutality and racism have flooded the streets and social media, another more inclusive term has been ascribed to the population: BIPOC. The acronym stands for "black, Indigenous and people of color." Though it is now ubiquitous in some corners of Twitter and Instagram, the earliest reference The New York Times could find on social media was a 2013 tweet. ..." To continue reading, see: Sandra E. Garcia, "Where Did BIPOC Come From?" The New York Times (June 17, 2020): https://www.nytimes.com/article/what-is-bipoc.html  
by A. Sanchez
Thursday, June 25, 2020
Going off: US cities see explosion in use of fireworks 0 A. Sanchez By Helen Sullivan-- "Cities across the US are experiencing a boom in the use of fireworks, with pyrotechnic-related complaints in New York City alone jumping 236 times higher than usual during the first three weeks of June.  Gothamist reported there were 6,385 calls to police about fireworks from 1 to 19 June, compared to 27 in the same period last year.  The New York Times attributed the spike in explosions to, "a release after months of boredom and seclusion in cramped apartments," as well as "a celebration of hard-fought strides made during the demonstrations, and a show of defiance toward the police." Other than sparklers, fireworks are illegal in New York. ..." To continue reading, see: Helen Sullivan, "Going off: US cities see explosion in use of fireworks," The Guardian (June 23, 2020): https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/jun/23/us-cities-see-explosion-in-use-of-fireworks  
by A. Sanchez
Wednesday, June 24, 2020
People Are Remembering What Music Is Really For 0 A. Sanchez By Spencer Kornhaber-- "It was getting late on Sunday night. The cheers that wash over New York City at 7 p.m. every day for hospital workers had happened hours before. Inside, I was mainlining an HBO drama about doom and dissolution, as one does during a pandemic. Yet deep in my consciousness, a warm and familiar tune played. Sometimes in our lives / We all have pain … Of course: “Lean on Me” by the recently departed Bill Withers. It got louder. And louder. Turns out it wasn’t coming from my brain. A car outside, with its speakers turned up surely past any legal limit, rolled by with the slowness of an ice-cream truck. Who was driving? No idea. It wasn’t the first time a one-ride parade had bombarded a New York block with some song. But in this instance, it shook up my night, mood-wise. I looked out, I hummed, and I felt fellowship—with whoever was in that car, with the planet’s worth of people mourning Withers, and with the other neighbors on my street no doubt hearing the same thing. It was as close to a concert or club as I’ve come in almost a month. That’s not because of the music’s loudness; it’s because the music felt shared. ..." To continue reading, see: Spencer Kornhaber, "People Are Remembering What Music Is Really For," The Atlantic (April 9, 2020): https://www.theatlantic.com/culture/archive/2020/04/coronavirus-has-forced-repurposing-music/609601/    
by A. Sanchez
Monday, June 15, 2020
On Remote Fieldwork and “Shifting Gears” 0 A. Sanchez By Michelle Stefano-- "I find inspiration in anthropologist Ulf Hannerz’s characterization of ethnography as ‘the art of the possible’ and take from it the idea of doing the best with what you got. During this time when physical distancing is not only mandatory, but also compassionate, the ways in which we have tended to proceed in setting up and facilitating our fieldwork have been dealt a serious blow. The steps we take to develop relationships with field partners while hanging out, talking, and observing in the field have been disrupted. And opportunities to learn more, interview, and document perspectives, expressions, and stories have become less than ideal. From my couch I recently attended a final class presentation of an undergraduate course in ethnography through an online videoconferencing platform. The course set out in late January to work with food justice organizations in Baltimore and produce a podcast by its end. Students were planning to document related places and conduct in-depth, semi-structured interviews with staff, community leaders, and activists…then, come mid-March, they had to “shift gears,” as the course’s professor aptly put it.[1] And with great agility, the students did just that: they turned the ethnographic lens inward to their own families, homes, and neighborhoods to document the various roles food was playing in and near their lives – from its scarcity in stores, and transforming backyards into gardens, to learning traditional recipes from elders, and eating with distant relatives on religious holidays via Skype." ... To continue reading, see the Folklife Today.    Michelle Stefano, "On Remote Fieldwork and 'Shifting Gears,'” Folklife Today (May 15, 2020): https://blogs.loc.gov/folklife/2020/05/on-remote-fieldwork-and-shifting-gears/
by A. Sanchez
Friday, May 15, 2020

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