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Smithsonian Shortens Folklife Festival On National Mall To Just 2 Days 0 E. Mee By Francesca Paris –– “If you're thinking of attending the Smithsonian Institution's Folklife Festival in Washington, D.C., this year, plan for June 29 and 30. Those are the new dates for the Smithsonian's annual celebration, which will shrink from 10 days to just two this summer, in part because of the partial government shutdown, according to the festival's director. ‘Unfortunately, the timing of the shutdown sort of played mischief with our production schedule,’ Sabrina Motley tells NPR. ‘We thought it was in the best interest of our festival to make this shift.’ The shortened festival on the National Mall will still focus on the social power of music, this year's Smithsonian-wide theme. But the extended programming that would have celebrated the cultures of Benin, Brazil and other countries has been postponed to 2020, Motley says.  …” To continue reading, visit the full article on NPR’s website. Paris, Francesca. “Smithsonian Shortens Folklife Festival On National Mall To Just 2 Days.” NPR. (March 14, 2019). <https://www.npr.org/2019/03/14/703602525/smithsonian-shortens-folklife-festival-on-national-mall-to-just-2-days?utm_source=npr_newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_content=20190315&utm_campaign=news&utm_term=nprnews>    
by E. Mee
Tuesday, March 19, 2019
The Wooster Group Explores Black Folklore in Texas State Prisons 0 E. Mee By Paul David Young –– “Director Kate Valk and performer Eric Berryman’s THE B-SIDE: “Negro Folklore from Texas State Prisons”: A Record Album Interpretation reenacts a vinyl record with The Wooster Group’s characteristic clinical precision, counting on the audience’s preexisting awareness of American slavery and Jim Crow laws to lend the performance all the pathos necessary. The piece is typical of The Wooster Group, which finds its material in the off-roads of culture — for instance, ‘B’ movies or an obscure panel discussion — usually layered with another, intentionally unrelated source. The Wooster Group’s performance in each piece grows out of the direct imitation of media: for example, aping the voice and gestures from Richard Burton’s 1964 film of Hamlet. Negro Folklore from Texas State Prisons is a companion piece to the Wooster Group’s Early Shakespeare Spirituals, directed by Valk, which also reenacted a vinyl record onstage.  …” To continue reading, visit the full article on Hyperallergic’s website. Young, Paul David. “The Wooster Group Explores Black Folklore in Texas State Prisons.” Hyperallergic. (March 15, 2019). <https://hyperallergic.com/489351/the-b-side-negro-folklore-from-texas-state-prisons-wooster-group/?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Weekend%20031719%20-%20The%20Alternate&utm_content=Weekend%20031719%20-%20The%20Alternate+CID_baa3088ddd9f28ac9340f751ab83ec48&utm_source=HyperallergicNewsletter>    
by E. Mee
Monday, March 18, 2019
Competing Histories or Hidden Transcripts? The Sources We Use 0 E. Mee By David Rotenstein –– “In January, History@Work published Heather Carpini’s important essay on competing histories. Carpini’s appeal for historians to dig ‘deeper, past the obvious sources, into the lives of the people who shaped, and were shaped by, a certain place’ is an essential call to action. This values- and human-centered approach to historic preservation is gaining traction. In this essay, I want to address some of the pitfalls of digging deeper into community histories. To do the essential work that Carpini recognized, public historians and historic preservationists need to rewrite the standard field manual that has crystallized over more than fifty years of production-line cultural resource management (CRM). Tight budgets and schedules, poorly trained fieldworkers, and implicit bias all play a role in reinforcing an approach to CRM that Richard Hutchings has described as the ‘McDonaldization of Heritage Stewardship.’ It’s going to take a lot more than recognizing that history is complicated; we need a substantial course correction.  …” To continue reading, visit the full article on NCPH History@Work’s website. Rotenstein, David. “Competing Histories or Hidden Transcripts? The Sources We Use.” NCPH History@Work. (March 13, 2019). <https://ncph.org/history-at-work/hidden-transcripts-sources-we-use/>    
by E. Mee
Monday, March 18, 2019
NASA and Navajo Nation Partner in Understanding the Universe 0 E. Mee By Meghan Bartels –– “When you pick out the stars that make up the Big Dipper, do you see a cluster of glowing balls of plasma or a pattern of gemstones carefully arranged by holy figures? For students in the Navajo Nation, the answer may well be both. That's because of a 14-year-long partnership between NASA and the Navajo Nation that helps teachers present cultural and scientific knowledge on an equal footing. Leaders of that partnership are busy developing their third set of educational activities, which will explore how the universe began. That collection follows two previous booklets and complementary teacher workshops, as well as a summer camp, all of which draw parallels between Navajo and scientific understandings of Earth and the world around us. ‘[The Navajo people's] cultural, traditional ways of knowing are inherently scientific … that's a really big message,’ Daniella Scalice, a non-native co-founder of the partnership and the education and communications lead at the NASA Astrobiology Program, told Space.com. ‘There is no difference between traditional cultural ways of generating knowledge and the ones that science uses.’ …” To continue reading, visit the full article on Space’s website. Bartels, Meghan. “NASA and Navajo Nation Partner in Understanding the Universe.” Space. (February 25, 2019). <https://www.space.com/nasa-partnership-with-navajo-nation.html >    
by E. Mee
Monday, March 4, 2019
Smithsonian Record Label Spotlights The Music Of Change 0 E. Mee By Mikaela Lefrak–– “Music that inspires resistance. Music sung at church or in temple. Music played at weddings and funerals. Music sung by activists around the world. ‘That’s kind of a really wide subject,’ laughed Jeff Place, the curator and senior archivist for Folkways Recordings, the Smithsonian’s record label. ‘How do you put your head around that one?’ Place doesn’t need to ask — he’s done it. On Friday, Folkways Recordings released ‘The Social Power of Music,’ a sweeping, timely 4-disc box set that explores music’s ability unite and energize communities around the world. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on NPR’s website. Lefrak, Mikaela. “Smithsonian Record Label Spotlights The Music Of Change.” NPR. (February 28, 2019). < https://wamu.org/story/19/02/22/the-social-movement-mix-tape-smithsonian-record-label-spotlights-the-music-of-change/#.XH0_l1NKhdg>    
by E. Mee
Monday, March 4, 2019
Momo Is Not Trying to Kill Children 0 E. Mee By Taylor Lorenz –– “On Tuesday afternoon, a Twitter user going by the name of Wanda Maximoff whipped out her iPhone and posted a terrifying message to parents. ‘Warning! Please read, this is real,’ she tweeted. “There is a thing called ‘Momo’ that’s instructing kids to kill themselves,” the attached screenshot of a Facebook post reads. “INFORM EVERYONE YOU CAN.” Maximoff’s plea has been retweeted more than 22,000 times, and the screenshot, featuring the creepy face of ‘Momo,’ has spread like wildfire across the internet. Local news hopped on the story Wednesday, amplifying it to millions of terrified parents. Kim Kardashian even posted a warning about the so-called Momo challenge to her 129 million Instagram followers. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on The Atlantic’s website. Lorenz, Taylor. “Momo Is Not Trying to Kill Children.” The Atlantic. (February 28, 2019). <https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2019/02/momo-challenge-hoax/583825/>    
by E. Mee
Monday, March 4, 2019
Rhiannon Giddens Is Reclaiming the Black Heritage of American Folk Music 0 E. Mee By John Lingan –– “In early 2018, folk-music torchbearer Rhiannon Giddens decamped to Breaux Bridge, La., with minstrelsy on her mind. In her early work with the Grammy-winning bluegrass band the Carolina Chocolate Drops and across two solo albums and a role in the TV series Nashville, Giddens has been as much a historian as a singer and banjoist. She’s won acclaim, including a MacArthur Foundation “genius” grant, for her attention to America’s folk traditions, but she felt that minstrelsy, with its troubled history, remained relatively unexplored. ‘It had such a gargantuan effect on American culture, world culture,’ Giddens says of the genre, which took root in the 1820s and ’30s. ‘This was the first time that tunes were written down. So I’ve been going at it from a musicology point of view, rather than looking at it as blackface and running screaming from the room.’ …” To continue reading, visit the full article on TIME’s website. Lingan, John. “Rhiannon Giddens Is Reclaiming the Black Heritage of American Folk Music.” TIME. (February 21, 2019). <http://amp.timeinc.net/time/5534379/songs-of-our-native-daughters-music-review>    
by E. Mee
Monday, February 25, 2019
The Battle to Save Lapland: 'First, They Took the Religion..." 0 E. Mee By Tom Wall –– “The frozen white expanse of Lake Inari stretches off towards banks of dark birch and pine trees marking the distant shore line. There is not even the faintest breeze – the sub-zero air is perfectly still and very, very cold. A delicate dusting of snowflakes has fallen in the night, a pristine layer of gleaming crystals resting on the thick sheet of snow and ice. Jussa Seurujärvi, 22, momentarily stops helping his father, 51, and sister, 16, pull up fishing nets from holes in the ice to take in the long, slow Arctic sunrise, which glows with pastel strokes of yellows, purples and pinks. His brow furrows slightly and he says with a gentle determination: ‘I want to continue living from this land just as my ancestors have done for hundreds and hundreds of years. This is a way of life for us – it is not just a job.’ …” To continue reading, visit the full article on The Guardian’s website. Wall, Tom. “The Battle to Save Lapland: 'First, They Took the Religion. Now They Want to Build a Railroad'.” The Guardian. (February 23, 2019). <https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/feb/23/battle-save-lapland-want-to-build-railroad?CMP=Share_AndroidApp_FastMail>    
by E. Mee
Monday, February 25, 2019
The Passamaquoddy Reclaim Their Culture Through Digital Repatriation 0 E. Mee By E. Tammy Kim –– “In late September, I travelled to Indian Township, Maine, the largest of three Passamaquoddy reservations, for the tribe’s annual ceremonial-days festival. That far northeast, the state is all water-edged hills and long stretches of humanless, single-lane roads, and it was in full autumnal splendor. Outside the reservation’s tribal office, in a field that was steps away from a shimmering lake, a few hundred Passamaquoddy people gathered to celebrate in pan-Indian powwow style. Donald Soctomah, the tribe’s soft-spoken historic-preservation officer, whom I’d been in touch with by phone, welcomed me to Indian Township. I knew him as the tireless steward of all things Passamaquoddy: he’s a photographer, archivist, museum curator, writer of books, designer of curricula, birch-bark-canoe builder, and former (non-voting) tribal representative to the state legislature. When I met him in person, after hearing his surname mentioned throughout the reservation, I learned that he’s also a father of thirteen. ‘I’m doing my part to keep the tribe going,’ he said, with a rare chuckle. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on The New Yorker’s website. Kim, E. Tammy. “The Passamaquoddy Reclaim Their Culture Through Digital Repatriation.” The New Yorker. (January 30, 2019). <https://www.newyorker.com/culture/culture-desk/the-passamaquoddy-reclaim-their-culture-through-digital-repatriation>    
by E. Mee
Tuesday, February 12, 2019
Bill Ferris Featured on NPR's Morning Edition 0 E. Mee Heard on Morning Edition –– “William Ferris is the keeper of Southern folklife. Born in Vicksburg, Miss. in 1942 and inspired by the people in his rural farm community, Ferris' dedicated documentation of the American South has led to a 3-CD box set of his recordings, Voices of Mississippi: Artists and Musicians Documented by William Ferris, which has been nominated for a two Grammy Awards in the categories of best historical album and best album notes. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on NPR’s website.  “Keeper Of Southern Folklife Is Up For 2 Grammy Awards.” NPR. (February 1, 2019). <https://www.npr.org/2019/02/01/690494130/the-keeper-of-southern-folk-is-up-for-2-grammy-awards>    
by E. Mee
Thursday, February 7, 2019
Rohingya Refugees Create Music To Memorialize Culture For Future Generation 0 E. Mee Sasha Ingber Interview with Mohammed Taker –– “More than 700,000 Rohingya Muslims have fled violence at the hands of security forces in Myanmar - that's in the last year alone. Today, nearly a million of them live in refugee camps in Bangladesh, where, as NPR's Sasha Ingber reports, they're using traditional music to document atrocities and hold on to who they are. SASHA INGBER, BYLINE: Inside a dim mud house a 40-minute bus ride from Thangkali refugee camp, Mohammed Taker takes his instruments off a shelf. The 35-year-old keeps his mandolin and harmonium stashed here, coming in the morning and going back to the refugee camp in the evening. MOHAMMED TAKER: (Through interpreter) If the government finds out that I'm singing songs, they will find me. INGBER: He's worried that if he plays music in the camp, informants from Myanmar - formerly known as Burma - will send word to the government. TAKER: (Through interpreter) We have people in our community who are friends with the Burmese government, and maybe they will sell them information. It's possible to find me because I'm one of only a few musicians. (Playing mandolin). …” To continue reading, visit the full interview on NPR’s website. Ingber, Sasha. “Rohingya Refugees Create Music To Memorialize Culture For Future Generations.” NPR. (January 26, 2019). <https://www.npr.org/2019/01/26/688976787/rohingya-refugees-create-music-to-memorialize-culture-for-future-generations>    
by E. Mee
Monday, January 28, 2019
Welcome To The World's Largest Gathering Of Humans 0 E. Mee By Lauren Frayer –– “Shivering and blue-lipped but smiling, Niraj Shukla emerged from the Ganges River this week, flanked by his parents and millions of other people, feeling renewed. ‘The water is very cold, but once you have a bath – it's sort of a miracle, you know?’ said Shukla, a 32-year-old engineer who lives in India's capital New Delhi. The Shukla family were among the first of what's expected to be 150 million pilgrims all taking a dip in India's holy river through March 4 as part of the Kumbh Mela, a Hindu religious festival billed as the world's largest gathering of human beings at one event. It happens every 12 years, its dates fixed according to the alignment of the stars and planets. This year is a half-Kumbh – six years since the last one – but it's nevertheless expected to be the biggest so far. The government officials and religious authorities who organize the event estimate that 15 million people showed up on Tuesday, the opening day.   For the 2019 event, some 200 miles of new roads were built to ferry pilgrims from all corners of India. They also come by train, or by boat down the Ganges, carrying their belongings in bundles balanced on their heads. Pilgrims sleep in a vast tent city at the river's edge, where temperatures slide toward freezing at night. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on NPR’s website. Frayer, Lauren. “Welcome To The World's Largest Gathering Of Humans.” NPR. (January 20, 2019). <https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2019/01/20/686482390/welcome-to-the-worlds-largest-gathering-of-humans>    
by E. Mee
Tuesday, January 22, 2019
Mother Jones in Suburban Maryland: Folklore and History 0 E. Mee D.S. Rotenstein –– “Thanks to the Internet and an endless stream of on-this-day (#OTD) social media posts, ordinary people are never far from history. Such is the case of my friend Glyn Robbins, a UK social justice activist and scholar immersed in housing and labor history and practice. Glyn recently read a post commemorating the anniversary of the death of 20th century labor activist Marry Harris ‘Mother’ Jones (1830-1930) Mother Jones emigrated to Canada from her native Ireland as a child. As an adult she worked as a schoolteacher and seamstress in Michigan and Chicago. In 1861, Harris married an ironworker and union member George Jones. In the 1870s, she began attending labor meetings and she became increasingly vocal. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on History Sidebar’s blog. Rotenstein, D.S. “Mother Jones in Suburban Maryland: Folklore and History.” History Sidebar. (January 3, 2019). < http://blog.historian4hire.net/2019/01/03/mother-jones/>    
by E. Mee
Thursday, January 10, 2019
New Ethnography of the Nogales Produce Industry 0 E. Mee Kimi Eisele –– “SFA is please to announce the publication of ‘Confianza en la Frontera: A Cultural Glimpse at the Nogales Produce Industry,’ by Nicholas Hartmann. The study looks at the produce industry in Nogales, Arizona, where generations of families have passed on knowledge and practices about transporting, storing, and marketing Mexican-grown vegetables in the United States. An occupational folklore, the study uses interviews with produce workers and family members to understand institutional knowledge about the industry. The paper highlights three primary areas: 1) the industry as a familial occupational tradition; 2) the role of trust in the industry; and 3) historic and current challenges faced by produce industry professionals and strategies used to overcome them. The study was researched and written by Nicholas Hartmann as part of his work as folklorist-in-residence with the SFA in 2015-16 and was supported by the Archie Green Fellowship of the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on the Southwest Folklife Alliance’s website. Eisele, Kimi. “New Ethnography of the Nogales Produce Industry.” Southwest Folklife Alliance. (January 9, 2019). <https://www.southwestfolklife.org/nogales-produce-industry/?fbclid=IwAR3N6OSAO8rLGv98Mfp2N0K4OKcMnqC9M85qUrrRt0oQEa-pmI7gHogjZ1k>    
by E. Mee
Thursday, January 10, 2019
Molina Siblings Donate $10M for Smithsonian’s Permanent Latino Gallery 0 E. Mee By Remezcla Estaff –– “Since the inception of the Smithsonian Latino Center in 1997, there has been a need for a permanent gallery that explores the contributions of Latinos in the United States. ‘In our founding document, there is a reference to the need for a gallery, but it’s been put on the back burner because of funds,’ said Eduardo Díaz, the center’s director, to the Long Beach Post. But now, a $10 million donation from five siblings is making this much-needed initiative possible two decades later. It started when Martha Molina Bernadett and her brother, Mario Molina, became friends with Roel Campos, the chairman of the center’s advisory board. ‘Our chairman met and built a relationship with the Molinas,’ Díaz added. ‘All that planning and then it happens because people become friends. When you think of it, that’s what this is about, that’s how most things get done: relationships.’ …” To continue reading, visit the full article on Remezcla’s website.  “Molina Siblings Donate $10M for the Creation of the Smithsonian’s First Permanent Latino Gallery Space.” Remezcla. (December 14, 2018). <http://remezcla.com/culture/smithsonian-permanent-latino-gallery-space/>
by E. Mee
Monday, January 7, 2019
Toward a Bright Future: A Look at the State of Folk and Traditional Arts 0 E. Mee Cliff Murphy, NEA Director of Folk and Traditional Arts –– “I don’t know if there’s a subgenre of writing where arts administrators gush about great meetings they’ve attended. But if there is, this will fit nicely into that category You see, I’m excited because this October, we held our first-ever national convening of folk and traditional arts organizations, practitioners, and programs. I joked at the outset of the convening that it felt a little bit like a wedding—whether I had met people before or not, I now knew that we were all related. And it’s a big family: we had about 120 attendees, from 44 states, two territories, and the District of Columbia packed into a room in Baltimore for three days as part of the National Assembly of State Arts Agencies (NASAA) pre-conference activities. The folklorists in the room—about one-third of the attendees—knew one another through conferences, regional organizations, and the NASAA network of state folk arts coordinators. But most everybody else was meeting one another for the first time. On the face of it, the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center, Virginia’s Crooked Road Heritage Trail, the Women of Color Quilters Network, San Jose Taiko, and the New York State Council on the Arts folk arts program may be very different organizations representing different cultures, artistic forms, or community functions, but the convening illuminated the fact that we are all engaged in a similar pursuit: carrying cultural knowledge forward into the future with relevance and respect. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on the NEA’s website. Murphy, Cliff. “Toward a Bright Future: A Look at the State of the Folk and Traditional Arts.” NEA. (December 2018). < https://www.arts.gov/article/toward-bright-future-look-state-folk-and-traditional-arts >
by E. Mee
Tuesday, December 11, 2018
Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Trolls 0 E. Mee Rich Smith –– “When I ask Professor Lotta Gavel Adams to compare internet trolls to the Nordic monsters she's loved since she was a Swedish schoolgirl, I can hear the disgust in her voice. 'Internet trolls are not trolls!' she tells me. 'Though online trolls are also forces of evil and chaos, they are really just human beings who are trying to cause trouble. If they don't eat snails or frogs or live in a cave, then they don't deserve the name 'troll.'' She would know. Gavel Adams, professor emeritus and Barbro Osher Endowed Professor of Swedish Studies at University of Washington, has spent her entire academic career publishing scholarship and teaching classes about the trolls inhabiting Scandinavian literature and folklore. In her hands, the subject is much more interesting than the digital parlor game of a bunch of idiots on the internet. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on The Stranger’s website. Smith, Rich. “Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Trolls.” The Stranger. (December 5, 2018). <https://www.thestranger.com/books/2018/12/05/36710754/everything-you-ever-wanted-to-know-about-trolls>
by E. Mee
Tuesday, December 11, 2018
Top 10 Folk Tales in Fiction 0 E. Mee Dan Coxon –– “In this age of smartphones and digital media, it’s been a joy and a wonder to see how folklore has survived. The popularity of the #FolkloreThursday hashtag on Twitter has already moved beyond mere survival and become a lively, international community. It’s hard to imagine such prolific cross-fertilisation of folk tales at any other point in history. Neither has the unlikely resurgence been restricted to revisiting the past. The advent of 'creepypasta' such as the Slender Man, carrying many of the hallmarks of traditional folk tales, has seen online communities starting to develop their own legends, their own lore. Folklore has survived in the 21st century by setting up home online. This fresh life was one of the main influences on This Dreaming Isle, the anthology of folklore-inspired short stories that I’ve spent the last two years compiling. The other was Brexit. (It always comes back to Brexit, doesn’t it?) When the book was first conceived we were still a few months away from the leave vote, but already the country felt divided, its future uncertain. I remember being anxious about where we were headed as a nation, and that anxiety has not lessened since. It felt natural to confront that uncertainty by looking at Britain’s folklore. That these folk tales were often frightening or unsettling seemed only right for the times. …”  To continue reading, visit the full article on The Guardian’s website. Coxon, Dan. “From Hound of the Baskervilles to the Essex Serpent: Top 10 Folk Tales in Fiction.” The Guardian. (November 28, 2018). <https://www.theguardian.com/books/2018/nov/28/from-hound-of-the-baskervilles-to-the-essex-serpent-top-10-folk-tales-in-fiction?CMP=share_btn_link>    
by E. Mee
Monday, December 3, 2018
A Virginia Tribe Reclaims Its Past 0 E. Mee Gregory S. Schneider –– “From the road, the abandoned chief’s house is a shadow, almost invisible under a cloak of vines and trees on the edge of a corn field. If you managed to find it, you wouldn’t know what it meant — the ragged wood siding, the gaping windows, the shattered plaster. The front room was where the tribal council met. The backroom was for Indian school, where children learned the old ways. Susie and Otha Nelson lived here beginning in the 1920s, waging a lifelong fight for the survival of their people, the Rappahannock Tribe. Today, their granddaughter carries on, and generations of persistence are beginning to pay off. Earlier this year, the Rappahannocks were among a handful of Virginia tribes who finally achieved federal recognition under a bill passed by Congress and signed by the president. ...” To continue reading, visit the full article on The Washington Post’s website. Schneider, Gregory S. “The Indians Were Right, the English Were Wrong: A Virginia Tribe Reclaims Its Past.” The Washington Post. (November 21, 2018). <https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/virginia-politics/the-indians-were-right-the-english-were-wrong-a-virginia-tribe-reclaims-its-past/2018/11/21/2380f92c-e8f4-11e8-bbdb-72fdbf9d4fed_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.70c187782da0&wpisrc=nl_most&wpmm=1>    
by E. Mee
Monday, November 26, 2018
Dorcas Reilly, Who Invented the Green Bean Casserole, Has Died at 92 0 E. Mee Brigit Katz ––   “This Thanksgiving, some 20 million Americans will tuck into green bean casserole, a culinary classic consisting of just six ingredients: a can of Campbell’s cream of mushroom soup, milk, soy sauce, black pepper, green beans and crunchy fried onions. The retro recipe, which has been appearing on American tables for more than 60 years, can be traced back to a woman named Dorcas Reilly, who died on October 15 at the age of 92, reports Timothy Bella of the Washington Post.    In 1955, Dorcas was working as a supervisor at the home economics department of a Campbell’s test kitchen in Camden, New Jersey, when she was tasked with creating a recipe for a feature that would appear in the Associated Press. The recipe had to be based on ingredients that any home cook would have on hand, including Campbell’s mushroom soup and green beans. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on the Smithsonian’s website.  Katz, Brigit. “The Woman Who Invented the Green Bean Casserole.” Smithsonian. (October 26, 2018) <https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/remembering-dorcas-reilly-inventor-green-bean-casserole-180970635/?utm_source=smithsoniandaily&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_campaign=20181026-daily-responsive&spMailingID=36925800&spUserID=NzQwNDU4NDY4NTkS1&spJobID=1382681991&spReportId=MTM4MjY4MTk5MQS2>  
by E. Mee
Wednesday, November 14, 2018

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