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Jack Dappa Blues: Black Traditional Music 0 B. Bridges By Lamont Jack Pearley –– "Cameron Kimbrough is the next generation of North Mississippi Hill Country Blues. His unique style of Blues has strong traditional characteristics of rawness and simplicity peppered with flavors Rock, Neo-Soul and R&B. With his feet firmly planted in his Blues birthright, Blues music, for Cameron, 'the Blues is in everything, it surrounds us…and makes you appreciate other moments in life…it’s kind of like a filtration' that 'out the frustrations, and keeps it from being balled up…' When you ask the youngest Kimbrough Bluesman what he wants to give people through his music, he says. 'I want to give people a different understanding of hardships… There’s light at the end of the tunnel. I want to give them a vibe that will take them away from the moment of whatever they were thinking about or going through before they heard the music…I want to give you something you can feel off in the front of your toenails!' ..." Cameron is one of three featured Black Traditional Music Practitioners in a series of recent blog posts by Lamont Jack Pearley. To continue reading about Cameron, visit the full article on the Jack Dappa Blues website. You can also check out posts about Joyce She'Wolf Jones and Yella P among many other emergent Black Traditional Music Practitioners. Pearley, Lamont Jack. "Cam Kimbrough Generational Blues." Jack Dappa Blues Radio. (April 23, 2019). <https://jackdappabluesradio.tv/cam-kimbrough/>
by B. Bridges
Tuesday, May 14, 2019
Defying Darkness: The Need for Creative and Cultural First Responders 0 E. Mee By Barry Bergey –– “This year the CERF+ Board of Directors held our annual spring meeting in San Juan, Puerto Rico, from March 20 – 24. The Board chose to meet there to provide us with more opportunities to deeply engage with and understand the culture, community, and needs of artists with whom we have been working closely since Hurricane Maria devastated the island in 2017. During our stay we met with many of the individuals who received our assistance, witnessed first-hand the positive impact CERF+ has had on Puerto Rican artists, and experienced the vibrant community of artisans on an island that is still in a state of recovery. In some ways, San Juan is getting back to normal after the hurricane. Cruise ships are visiting, street festivals are occurring, and people are visiting markets. As the CERF+ Board was meeting at the Museo de Arte de Puerto Rico, we could hear the sounds of a large festival taking place across the street that featured Yo-Yo Ma and José Andrés’World Central Kitchen. Despite these promising signs, we were constantly reminded that tourism is not the cure for all ills and that the average cruise visitor only spends $60 on the island. There is no doubt that progress has been made, but many, especially in the more rural areas are still struggling and need additional assistance. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on CERF+’s website. Bergey, Barry. "Defying Darkness: The Need for Creative and Cultural First Responders.” CERF+. (April 2019). < https://cerfplus.org/defying-darkness-the-need-for-creative-and-cultural-first-responders-by-barry-bergey/?org=808&lvl=100&ite=1495&lea=0&ctr=0&par=1&trk=>    
by E. Mee
Thursday, May 2, 2019
A Brief History of Cooties 0 E. Mee By Jane C. Hu –– “If all the germs kids are exposed to on the playground, there’s one they freak out about more than any other: cooties. The word first appeared during World War I as soldiers’ slang for the painful body lice that infested the trenches. It went mainstream in 1919 when a Chicago company incorporated the pest into the Cootie Game, in which a player maneuvered colored “cootie” capsules across a painted battlefield into a cage. The cooties concept has been evolving ever since. The most familiar incarnation has features of a real infectious disease even as it says a good deal about what 6-year-olds think of the opposite sex. Every little girl knows that boys have cooties, and vice versa. One catches cooties by—eww!—touching. Shrieking games of cooties tag transmit the contagion rapidly. It can be treated with an origami ‘cootie catcher,’ but it is better to be vaccinated. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on Smithsonian Magazine’s website. Hu, Jane C. “A Brief History of Cooties.” Smithsonian Magazine. (April 22, 2019). < https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/brief-history-cooties-180971914/>    
by E. Mee
Monday, April 22, 2019
Exhibit at Smithsonian Notes Agua Calientes' Perseverance in Section 14 0 E. Mee By Keith Kohn –– “Leaders of the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians were in Washington this week at the official opening of a Smithsonian Institution exhibit about life in Section 14, an area defined by abuse and discrimination of tribal members in the mid-1900s that is now part of the Palm Springs core. Tribal Chairman Jeff Grubbe and other leaders took part in the ceremony Wednesday introducing ‘Section 14: The Other Palm Springs, California.’ The exhibit was developed at the Palm Springs tribe's cultural museum. Section 14 is a square-mile tract that extends from Ramon Road north to Alejo Road and Indian Canyon Drive to Sunrise Way.  The exhibit at the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian describes life in Section 14 and how Palm Springs leaders kept it isolated and unable to access basic city services. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on Desert Sun’s website. Kohn, Keith. “Exhibit at Smithsonian in D.C. Notes Agua Calientes' Perseverance in Palm Springs' Section 14.” Desert Sun. (April 10, 2019). <https://www.desertsun.com/story/news/2019/04/10/smithsonian-exhibit-notes-agua-calientes-perseverance-section-14/3428969002/>    
by E. Mee
Monday, April 22, 2019
The Death of an Adjunct 1 E. Mee Thanks for sending on this article. To be honest, it increased me to tears and it made me angry at a system that is disrespectful of the human in human being
by J. Rosenberg
Monday, April 15, 2019
The Hunt Is On For the Last Slave Ship to Arrive in the U.S. 0 E. Mee By Megan Thompson and Mori Rothman –– “Archaeologists are analyzing data from a survey of Alabama’s Mobile River, looking for the Clotilda, the last known slave ship to arrive in America. The ship's survivors were enslaved for a few years before forming a unique community, Africatown. Clotilda descendants say its discovery would highlight their ancestors' story of strength and survival. NewsHour Weekend's Megan Thompson reports.  …” To continue reading, visit the full transcript on PBS’s website. Thompson, Megan and Mori Rothman. “The Hunt Is On For the Last Slave Ship to Arrive in the U.S.” PBS. (April 10, 2019). < https://www.pbs.org/newshour/amp/show/the-hunt-is-on-for-the-last-slave-ship-to-arrive-in-the-u-s >    
by E. Mee
Monday, April 15, 2019
Celebrate Pete Seeger’s Centennial with a Never-Before-Heard Recording 0 E. Mee By Erin Vanderhoof –– “Pete Seeger, who died in 2014 at the age of 94, saw innumerable changes in American politics during his long career. Although he was blacklisted for his left-wing political beliefs during the era of Joseph McCarthy, he went on to play at a concert for President Barack Obama’s inauguration in 2009. And as democratic socialism finds a new foothold among millennials, his message of justice and egalitarianism has found new relevance. A few years ago, a prescient team at Smithsonian Folkways Recordings, the nonprofit record label housed at the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage, began planning to celebrate the centennial of his 1919 birth. On May 3, it will release Pete Seeger: The Smithsonian Folkways Collection, a box set that collects countless recordings Seeger made during his lifetime, including some that have never before been released. Jeff Place, the curator and senior archivist who helmed the project, also worked on two other box sets of folk legends that Smithsonian Folkways has released over the last few years: Lead Belly and Woody Guthrie. In a recent interview, Place said that he sees the projects as a trilogy that works together to tell the story of important changes in American music. It also tells the story of his career: working at the Smithsonian to preserve and protect the history of American music. ‘It’s a long journey. I’ve been the curator and archivist for the Folklife collection for 30 years,’ he said. ‘I’ve been working with the Pete, Woody, and Lead Belly collections really closely, trying to digitize them. There were 300 extra tapes, in addition to the 70 albums that [Seeger] did for Folkways, and I spent all these years going through them. It’s getting to the end of my career, so I decided to do these big projects, and clear my brain of all things that I’ve learned about this amazing music, especially Pete’s.’  …” To continue reading, visit the full article on Vanity Fair's website. Vanderhoof, Erin. “Celebrate Pete Seeger’s Centennial with a Never-Before-Heard Pete Seeger Recording.” Vanity Fair. (March 29, 2019). < https://www.vanityfair.com/style/2019/03/pete-seeger-smithsonian-folkways-interview >    
by E. Mee
Monday, April 15, 2019
Massive Fire at Famous Civil Rights Center, 'White Power' Symbol Found 0 E. Mee By Eli Rosenberg –– “After a fire burned down the main building of a storied civil rights center in Tennessee last week, the center’s organization has said that a symbol associated with the white power movement was found in the parking lot next to the rubble of the building. The Highlander Center, which hosted civil rights figures including the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Rosa Parks and Stokely Carmichael in the 1950s and ’60s, made the disclosure on its Facebook page Tuesday. No one was injured, but the fire destroyed the office, which housed what the center said was decades worth of historical documents, speeches, artifacts and other memorabilia from its history, including the era of the civil rights movement. The Wisconsin Historical Society, which is the center’s official archivist, said that a majority of its archives are safe. “While we do not know the names of the culprits, we know that the white power movement has been increasing and consolidating power across the South, across this nation, and globally,” it wrote.  …” To continue reading, visit the full article on The Washington Post’s website.  Rosenberg, Eli. “After Massive Fire at Famous Civil Rights Center, Officials Found a ‘White Power’ Symbol Nearby.” The Washington Post. (April 2, 2019). < https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2019/04/03/highlander-center-civil-rights-fire-white-power-symbol/?utm_term=.6de17848afb0 >
by E. Mee
Wednesday, April 10, 2019
The Story of Storytelling 0 E. Mee By Ferris Jabr –– “’Little Red Riding Hood'—with its striding plot, its memorable characters, and its rich symbolism—has inspired ceaseless adaptations. Since the seventeenth century, writers have expanded, revised, and modernized the beloved fairy tale thousands of times. Literary scholars, anthropologists, and folklorists have devoted reams of text to analyzing the long-lived story, interpreting it as an allegory of puberty and sexual awakening, a parable about spiritual rebirth, a metaphor for nature’s cycles (night swallowing day, day bursting forth again), and a cautionary tale about kidnapping, pedophilia, and rape. Artists have retold the story in just about every medium: television, film, theater, pop music, graphic novels, video games. Anne Sexton wrote a poem about ‘a shy budkin / in a red red hood’ and a huntsman who rescues her with ‘a kind of caesarian section.’ In Roald Dahl’s version, she ‘whips a pistol from her knickers,’ shoots the wolf in the head, and wears his fur as a coat. The 1996 movie Freeway recasts the wolf as a serial killer and Little Red Riding Hood as a teenage runaway. Liza Minnelli starred in a Christmas special modeled on the fable. Both Walt Disney and Tex Avery—­the cartoonist and director who helped popularize Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, and Elmer Fudd—made animated versions with decidedly different themes. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on Harper’s Magazine’s website. Jabr, Ferris. “The Story of Storytelling.” Harper’s Magazine. (March 6, 2019). <https://harpers.org/archive/2019/03/the-story-of-storytelling/ >    
by E. Mee
Thursday, March 28, 2019
Smithsonian Shortens Folklife Festival On National Mall To Just 2 Days 0 E. Mee By Francesca Paris –– “If you're thinking of attending the Smithsonian Institution's Folklife Festival in Washington, D.C., this year, plan for June 29 and 30. Those are the new dates for the Smithsonian's annual celebration, which will shrink from 10 days to just two this summer, in part because of the partial government shutdown, according to the festival's director. ‘Unfortunately, the timing of the shutdown sort of played mischief with our production schedule,’ Sabrina Motley tells NPR. ‘We thought it was in the best interest of our festival to make this shift.’ The shortened festival on the National Mall will still focus on the social power of music, this year's Smithsonian-wide theme. But the extended programming that would have celebrated the cultures of Benin, Brazil and other countries has been postponed to 2020, Motley says.  …” To continue reading, visit the full article on NPR’s website. Paris, Francesca. “Smithsonian Shortens Folklife Festival On National Mall To Just 2 Days.” NPR. (March 14, 2019). <https://www.npr.org/2019/03/14/703602525/smithsonian-shortens-folklife-festival-on-national-mall-to-just-2-days?utm_source=npr_newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_content=20190315&utm_campaign=news&utm_term=nprnews>    
by E. Mee
Tuesday, March 19, 2019
The Wooster Group Explores Black Folklore in Texas State Prisons 0 E. Mee By Paul David Young –– “Director Kate Valk and performer Eric Berryman’s THE B-SIDE: “Negro Folklore from Texas State Prisons”: A Record Album Interpretation reenacts a vinyl record with The Wooster Group’s characteristic clinical precision, counting on the audience’s preexisting awareness of American slavery and Jim Crow laws to lend the performance all the pathos necessary. The piece is typical of The Wooster Group, which finds its material in the off-roads of culture — for instance, ‘B’ movies or an obscure panel discussion — usually layered with another, intentionally unrelated source. The Wooster Group’s performance in each piece grows out of the direct imitation of media: for example, aping the voice and gestures from Richard Burton’s 1964 film of Hamlet. Negro Folklore from Texas State Prisons is a companion piece to the Wooster Group’s Early Shakespeare Spirituals, directed by Valk, which also reenacted a vinyl record onstage.  …” To continue reading, visit the full article on Hyperallergic’s website. Young, Paul David. “The Wooster Group Explores Black Folklore in Texas State Prisons.” Hyperallergic. (March 15, 2019). <https://hyperallergic.com/489351/the-b-side-negro-folklore-from-texas-state-prisons-wooster-group/?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Weekend%20031719%20-%20The%20Alternate&utm_content=Weekend%20031719%20-%20The%20Alternate+CID_baa3088ddd9f28ac9340f751ab83ec48&utm_source=HyperallergicNewsletter>    
by E. Mee
Monday, March 18, 2019
Competing Histories or Hidden Transcripts? The Sources We Use 0 E. Mee By David Rotenstein –– “In January, History@Work published Heather Carpini’s important essay on competing histories. Carpini’s appeal for historians to dig ‘deeper, past the obvious sources, into the lives of the people who shaped, and were shaped by, a certain place’ is an essential call to action. This values- and human-centered approach to historic preservation is gaining traction. In this essay, I want to address some of the pitfalls of digging deeper into community histories. To do the essential work that Carpini recognized, public historians and historic preservationists need to rewrite the standard field manual that has crystallized over more than fifty years of production-line cultural resource management (CRM). Tight budgets and schedules, poorly trained fieldworkers, and implicit bias all play a role in reinforcing an approach to CRM that Richard Hutchings has described as the ‘McDonaldization of Heritage Stewardship.’ It’s going to take a lot more than recognizing that history is complicated; we need a substantial course correction.  …” To continue reading, visit the full article on NCPH History@Work’s website. Rotenstein, David. “Competing Histories or Hidden Transcripts? The Sources We Use.” NCPH History@Work. (March 13, 2019). <https://ncph.org/history-at-work/hidden-transcripts-sources-we-use/>    
by E. Mee
Monday, March 18, 2019
NASA and Navajo Nation Partner in Understanding the Universe 0 E. Mee By Meghan Bartels –– “When you pick out the stars that make up the Big Dipper, do you see a cluster of glowing balls of plasma or a pattern of gemstones carefully arranged by holy figures? For students in the Navajo Nation, the answer may well be both. That's because of a 14-year-long partnership between NASA and the Navajo Nation that helps teachers present cultural and scientific knowledge on an equal footing. Leaders of that partnership are busy developing their third set of educational activities, which will explore how the universe began. That collection follows two previous booklets and complementary teacher workshops, as well as a summer camp, all of which draw parallels between Navajo and scientific understandings of Earth and the world around us. ‘[The Navajo people's] cultural, traditional ways of knowing are inherently scientific … that's a really big message,’ Daniella Scalice, a non-native co-founder of the partnership and the education and communications lead at the NASA Astrobiology Program, told Space.com. ‘There is no difference between traditional cultural ways of generating knowledge and the ones that science uses.’ …” To continue reading, visit the full article on Space’s website. Bartels, Meghan. “NASA and Navajo Nation Partner in Understanding the Universe.” Space. (February 25, 2019). <https://www.space.com/nasa-partnership-with-navajo-nation.html >    
by E. Mee
Monday, March 4, 2019
Smithsonian Record Label Spotlights The Music Of Change 0 E. Mee By Mikaela Lefrak–– “Music that inspires resistance. Music sung at church or in temple. Music played at weddings and funerals. Music sung by activists around the world. ‘That’s kind of a really wide subject,’ laughed Jeff Place, the curator and senior archivist for Folkways Recordings, the Smithsonian’s record label. ‘How do you put your head around that one?’ Place doesn’t need to ask — he’s done it. On Friday, Folkways Recordings released ‘The Social Power of Music,’ a sweeping, timely 4-disc box set that explores music’s ability unite and energize communities around the world. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on NPR’s website. Lefrak, Mikaela. “Smithsonian Record Label Spotlights The Music Of Change.” NPR. (February 28, 2019). < https://wamu.org/story/19/02/22/the-social-movement-mix-tape-smithsonian-record-label-spotlights-the-music-of-change/#.XH0_l1NKhdg>    
by E. Mee
Monday, March 4, 2019
Momo Is Not Trying to Kill Children 0 E. Mee By Taylor Lorenz –– “On Tuesday afternoon, a Twitter user going by the name of Wanda Maximoff whipped out her iPhone and posted a terrifying message to parents. ‘Warning! Please read, this is real,’ she tweeted. “There is a thing called ‘Momo’ that’s instructing kids to kill themselves,” the attached screenshot of a Facebook post reads. “INFORM EVERYONE YOU CAN.” Maximoff’s plea has been retweeted more than 22,000 times, and the screenshot, featuring the creepy face of ‘Momo,’ has spread like wildfire across the internet. Local news hopped on the story Wednesday, amplifying it to millions of terrified parents. Kim Kardashian even posted a warning about the so-called Momo challenge to her 129 million Instagram followers. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on The Atlantic’s website. Lorenz, Taylor. “Momo Is Not Trying to Kill Children.” The Atlantic. (February 28, 2019). <https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2019/02/momo-challenge-hoax/583825/>    
by E. Mee
Monday, March 4, 2019
Rhiannon Giddens Is Reclaiming the Black Heritage of American Folk Music 0 E. Mee By John Lingan –– “In early 2018, folk-music torchbearer Rhiannon Giddens decamped to Breaux Bridge, La., with minstrelsy on her mind. In her early work with the Grammy-winning bluegrass band the Carolina Chocolate Drops and across two solo albums and a role in the TV series Nashville, Giddens has been as much a historian as a singer and banjoist. She’s won acclaim, including a MacArthur Foundation “genius” grant, for her attention to America’s folk traditions, but she felt that minstrelsy, with its troubled history, remained relatively unexplored. ‘It had such a gargantuan effect on American culture, world culture,’ Giddens says of the genre, which took root in the 1820s and ’30s. ‘This was the first time that tunes were written down. So I’ve been going at it from a musicology point of view, rather than looking at it as blackface and running screaming from the room.’ …” To continue reading, visit the full article on TIME’s website. Lingan, John. “Rhiannon Giddens Is Reclaiming the Black Heritage of American Folk Music.” TIME. (February 21, 2019). <http://amp.timeinc.net/time/5534379/songs-of-our-native-daughters-music-review>    
by E. Mee
Monday, February 25, 2019
The Battle to Save Lapland: 'First, They Took the Religion..." 0 E. Mee By Tom Wall –– “The frozen white expanse of Lake Inari stretches off towards banks of dark birch and pine trees marking the distant shore line. There is not even the faintest breeze – the sub-zero air is perfectly still and very, very cold. A delicate dusting of snowflakes has fallen in the night, a pristine layer of gleaming crystals resting on the thick sheet of snow and ice. Jussa Seurujärvi, 22, momentarily stops helping his father, 51, and sister, 16, pull up fishing nets from holes in the ice to take in the long, slow Arctic sunrise, which glows with pastel strokes of yellows, purples and pinks. His brow furrows slightly and he says with a gentle determination: ‘I want to continue living from this land just as my ancestors have done for hundreds and hundreds of years. This is a way of life for us – it is not just a job.’ …” To continue reading, visit the full article on The Guardian’s website. Wall, Tom. “The Battle to Save Lapland: 'First, They Took the Religion. Now They Want to Build a Railroad'.” The Guardian. (February 23, 2019). <https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/feb/23/battle-save-lapland-want-to-build-railroad?CMP=Share_AndroidApp_FastMail>    
by E. Mee
Monday, February 25, 2019
The Passamaquoddy Reclaim Their Culture Through Digital Repatriation 0 E. Mee By E. Tammy Kim –– “In late September, I travelled to Indian Township, Maine, the largest of three Passamaquoddy reservations, for the tribe’s annual ceremonial-days festival. That far northeast, the state is all water-edged hills and long stretches of humanless, single-lane roads, and it was in full autumnal splendor. Outside the reservation’s tribal office, in a field that was steps away from a shimmering lake, a few hundred Passamaquoddy people gathered to celebrate in pan-Indian powwow style. Donald Soctomah, the tribe’s soft-spoken historic-preservation officer, whom I’d been in touch with by phone, welcomed me to Indian Township. I knew him as the tireless steward of all things Passamaquoddy: he’s a photographer, archivist, museum curator, writer of books, designer of curricula, birch-bark-canoe builder, and former (non-voting) tribal representative to the state legislature. When I met him in person, after hearing his surname mentioned throughout the reservation, I learned that he’s also a father of thirteen. ‘I’m doing my part to keep the tribe going,’ he said, with a rare chuckle. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on The New Yorker’s website. Kim, E. Tammy. “The Passamaquoddy Reclaim Their Culture Through Digital Repatriation.” The New Yorker. (January 30, 2019). <https://www.newyorker.com/culture/culture-desk/the-passamaquoddy-reclaim-their-culture-through-digital-repatriation>    
by E. Mee
Tuesday, February 12, 2019
Bill Ferris Featured on NPR's Morning Edition 0 E. Mee Heard on Morning Edition –– “William Ferris is the keeper of Southern folklife. Born in Vicksburg, Miss. in 1942 and inspired by the people in his rural farm community, Ferris' dedicated documentation of the American South has led to a 3-CD box set of his recordings, Voices of Mississippi: Artists and Musicians Documented by William Ferris, which has been nominated for a two Grammy Awards in the categories of best historical album and best album notes. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on NPR’s website.  “Keeper Of Southern Folklife Is Up For 2 Grammy Awards.” NPR. (February 1, 2019). <https://www.npr.org/2019/02/01/690494130/the-keeper-of-southern-folk-is-up-for-2-grammy-awards>    
by E. Mee
Thursday, February 7, 2019
Rohingya Refugees Create Music To Memorialize Culture For Future Generation 0 E. Mee Sasha Ingber Interview with Mohammed Taker –– “More than 700,000 Rohingya Muslims have fled violence at the hands of security forces in Myanmar - that's in the last year alone. Today, nearly a million of them live in refugee camps in Bangladesh, where, as NPR's Sasha Ingber reports, they're using traditional music to document atrocities and hold on to who they are. SASHA INGBER, BYLINE: Inside a dim mud house a 40-minute bus ride from Thangkali refugee camp, Mohammed Taker takes his instruments off a shelf. The 35-year-old keeps his mandolin and harmonium stashed here, coming in the morning and going back to the refugee camp in the evening. MOHAMMED TAKER: (Through interpreter) If the government finds out that I'm singing songs, they will find me. INGBER: He's worried that if he plays music in the camp, informants from Myanmar - formerly known as Burma - will send word to the government. TAKER: (Through interpreter) We have people in our community who are friends with the Burmese government, and maybe they will sell them information. It's possible to find me because I'm one of only a few musicians. (Playing mandolin). …” To continue reading, visit the full interview on NPR’s website. Ingber, Sasha. “Rohingya Refugees Create Music To Memorialize Culture For Future Generations.” NPR. (January 26, 2019). <https://www.npr.org/2019/01/26/688976787/rohingya-refugees-create-music-to-memorialize-culture-for-future-generations>    
by E. Mee
Monday, January 28, 2019

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