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Mother Jones in Suburban Maryland: Folklore and History 0 E. Mee D.S. Rotenstein –– “Thanks to the Internet and an endless stream of on-this-day (#OTD) social media posts, ordinary people are never far from history. Such is the case of my friend Glyn Robbins, a UK social justice activist and scholar immersed in housing and labor history and practice. Glyn recently read a post commemorating the anniversary of the death of 20th century labor activist Marry Harris ‘Mother’ Jones (1830-1930) Mother Jones emigrated to Canada from her native Ireland as a child. As an adult she worked as a schoolteacher and seamstress in Michigan and Chicago. In 1861, Harris married an ironworker and union member George Jones. In the 1870s, she began attending labor meetings and she became increasingly vocal. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on History Sidebar’s blog. Rotenstein, D.S. “Mother Jones in Suburban Maryland: Folklore and History.” History Sidebar. (January 3, 2019). < http://blog.historian4hire.net/2019/01/03/mother-jones/>    
by E. Mee
Thursday, January 10, 2019
New Ethnography of the Nogales Produce Industry 0 E. Mee Kimi Eisele –– “SFA is please to announce the publication of ‘Confianza en la Frontera: A Cultural Glimpse at the Nogales Produce Industry,’ by Nicholas Hartmann. The study looks at the produce industry in Nogales, Arizona, where generations of families have passed on knowledge and practices about transporting, storing, and marketing Mexican-grown vegetables in the United States. An occupational folklore, the study uses interviews with produce workers and family members to understand institutional knowledge about the industry. The paper highlights three primary areas: 1) the industry as a familial occupational tradition; 2) the role of trust in the industry; and 3) historic and current challenges faced by produce industry professionals and strategies used to overcome them. The study was researched and written by Nicholas Hartmann as part of his work as folklorist-in-residence with the SFA in 2015-16 and was supported by the Archie Green Fellowship of the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on the Southwest Folklife Alliance’s website. Eisele, Kimi. “New Ethnography of the Nogales Produce Industry.” Southwest Folklife Alliance. (January 9, 2019). <https://www.southwestfolklife.org/nogales-produce-industry/?fbclid=IwAR3N6OSAO8rLGv98Mfp2N0K4OKcMnqC9M85qUrrRt0oQEa-pmI7gHogjZ1k>    
by E. Mee
Thursday, January 10, 2019
Molina Siblings Donate $10M for Smithsonian’s Permanent Latino Gallery 0 E. Mee By Remezcla Estaff –– “Since the inception of the Smithsonian Latino Center in 1997, there has been a need for a permanent gallery that explores the contributions of Latinos in the United States. ‘In our founding document, there is a reference to the need for a gallery, but it’s been put on the back burner because of funds,’ said Eduardo Díaz, the center’s director, to the Long Beach Post. But now, a $10 million donation from five siblings is making this much-needed initiative possible two decades later. It started when Martha Molina Bernadett and her brother, Mario Molina, became friends with Roel Campos, the chairman of the center’s advisory board. ‘Our chairman met and built a relationship with the Molinas,’ Díaz added. ‘All that planning and then it happens because people become friends. When you think of it, that’s what this is about, that’s how most things get done: relationships.’ …” To continue reading, visit the full article on Remezcla’s website.  “Molina Siblings Donate $10M for the Creation of the Smithsonian’s First Permanent Latino Gallery Space.” Remezcla. (December 14, 2018). <http://remezcla.com/culture/smithsonian-permanent-latino-gallery-space/>
by E. Mee
Monday, January 7, 2019
Toward a Bright Future: A Look at the State of Folk and Traditional Arts 0 E. Mee Cliff Murphy, NEA Director of Folk and Traditional Arts –– “I don’t know if there’s a subgenre of writing where arts administrators gush about great meetings they’ve attended. But if there is, this will fit nicely into that category You see, I’m excited because this October, we held our first-ever national convening of folk and traditional arts organizations, practitioners, and programs. I joked at the outset of the convening that it felt a little bit like a wedding—whether I had met people before or not, I now knew that we were all related. And it’s a big family: we had about 120 attendees, from 44 states, two territories, and the District of Columbia packed into a room in Baltimore for three days as part of the National Assembly of State Arts Agencies (NASAA) pre-conference activities. The folklorists in the room—about one-third of the attendees—knew one another through conferences, regional organizations, and the NASAA network of state folk arts coordinators. But most everybody else was meeting one another for the first time. On the face of it, the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center, Virginia’s Crooked Road Heritage Trail, the Women of Color Quilters Network, San Jose Taiko, and the New York State Council on the Arts folk arts program may be very different organizations representing different cultures, artistic forms, or community functions, but the convening illuminated the fact that we are all engaged in a similar pursuit: carrying cultural knowledge forward into the future with relevance and respect. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on the NEA’s website. Murphy, Cliff. “Toward a Bright Future: A Look at the State of the Folk and Traditional Arts.” NEA. (December 2018). < https://www.arts.gov/article/toward-bright-future-look-state-folk-and-traditional-arts >
by E. Mee
Tuesday, December 11, 2018
Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Trolls 0 E. Mee Rich Smith –– “When I ask Professor Lotta Gavel Adams to compare internet trolls to the Nordic monsters she's loved since she was a Swedish schoolgirl, I can hear the disgust in her voice. 'Internet trolls are not trolls!' she tells me. 'Though online trolls are also forces of evil and chaos, they are really just human beings who are trying to cause trouble. If they don't eat snails or frogs or live in a cave, then they don't deserve the name 'troll.'' She would know. Gavel Adams, professor emeritus and Barbro Osher Endowed Professor of Swedish Studies at University of Washington, has spent her entire academic career publishing scholarship and teaching classes about the trolls inhabiting Scandinavian literature and folklore. In her hands, the subject is much more interesting than the digital parlor game of a bunch of idiots on the internet. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on The Stranger’s website. Smith, Rich. “Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Trolls.” The Stranger. (December 5, 2018). <https://www.thestranger.com/books/2018/12/05/36710754/everything-you-ever-wanted-to-know-about-trolls>
by E. Mee
Tuesday, December 11, 2018
Top 10 Folk Tales in Fiction 0 E. Mee Dan Coxon –– “In this age of smartphones and digital media, it’s been a joy and a wonder to see how folklore has survived. The popularity of the #FolkloreThursday hashtag on Twitter has already moved beyond mere survival and become a lively, international community. It’s hard to imagine such prolific cross-fertilisation of folk tales at any other point in history. Neither has the unlikely resurgence been restricted to revisiting the past. The advent of 'creepypasta' such as the Slender Man, carrying many of the hallmarks of traditional folk tales, has seen online communities starting to develop their own legends, their own lore. Folklore has survived in the 21st century by setting up home online. This fresh life was one of the main influences on This Dreaming Isle, the anthology of folklore-inspired short stories that I’ve spent the last two years compiling. The other was Brexit. (It always comes back to Brexit, doesn’t it?) When the book was first conceived we were still a few months away from the leave vote, but already the country felt divided, its future uncertain. I remember being anxious about where we were headed as a nation, and that anxiety has not lessened since. It felt natural to confront that uncertainty by looking at Britain’s folklore. That these folk tales were often frightening or unsettling seemed only right for the times. …”  To continue reading, visit the full article on The Guardian’s website. Coxon, Dan. “From Hound of the Baskervilles to the Essex Serpent: Top 10 Folk Tales in Fiction.” The Guardian. (November 28, 2018). <https://www.theguardian.com/books/2018/nov/28/from-hound-of-the-baskervilles-to-the-essex-serpent-top-10-folk-tales-in-fiction?CMP=share_btn_link>    
by E. Mee
Monday, December 3, 2018
A Virginia Tribe Reclaims Its Past 0 E. Mee Gregory S. Schneider –– “From the road, the abandoned chief’s house is a shadow, almost invisible under a cloak of vines and trees on the edge of a corn field. If you managed to find it, you wouldn’t know what it meant — the ragged wood siding, the gaping windows, the shattered plaster. The front room was where the tribal council met. The backroom was for Indian school, where children learned the old ways. Susie and Otha Nelson lived here beginning in the 1920s, waging a lifelong fight for the survival of their people, the Rappahannock Tribe. Today, their granddaughter carries on, and generations of persistence are beginning to pay off. Earlier this year, the Rappahannocks were among a handful of Virginia tribes who finally achieved federal recognition under a bill passed by Congress and signed by the president. ...” To continue reading, visit the full article on The Washington Post’s website. Schneider, Gregory S. “The Indians Were Right, the English Were Wrong: A Virginia Tribe Reclaims Its Past.” The Washington Post. (November 21, 2018). <https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/virginia-politics/the-indians-were-right-the-english-were-wrong-a-virginia-tribe-reclaims-its-past/2018/11/21/2380f92c-e8f4-11e8-bbdb-72fdbf9d4fed_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.70c187782da0&wpisrc=nl_most&wpmm=1>    
by E. Mee
Monday, November 26, 2018
Dorcas Reilly, Who Invented the Green Bean Casserole, Has Died at 92 0 E. Mee Brigit Katz ––   “This Thanksgiving, some 20 million Americans will tuck into green bean casserole, a culinary classic consisting of just six ingredients: a can of Campbell’s cream of mushroom soup, milk, soy sauce, black pepper, green beans and crunchy fried onions. The retro recipe, which has been appearing on American tables for more than 60 years, can be traced back to a woman named Dorcas Reilly, who died on October 15 at the age of 92, reports Timothy Bella of the Washington Post.    In 1955, Dorcas was working as a supervisor at the home economics department of a Campbell’s test kitchen in Camden, New Jersey, when she was tasked with creating a recipe for a feature that would appear in the Associated Press. The recipe had to be based on ingredients that any home cook would have on hand, including Campbell’s mushroom soup and green beans. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on the Smithsonian’s website.  Katz, Brigit. “The Woman Who Invented the Green Bean Casserole.” Smithsonian. (October 26, 2018) <https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/remembering-dorcas-reilly-inventor-green-bean-casserole-180970635/?utm_source=smithsoniandaily&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_campaign=20181026-daily-responsive&spMailingID=36925800&spUserID=NzQwNDU4NDY4NTkS1&spJobID=1382681991&spReportId=MTM4MjY4MTk5MQS2>  
by E. Mee
Wednesday, November 14, 2018
In The Land Of Dracula, Witches Work As 'Life Coaches' Of The Supernatural 0 E. Mee Joanna Kakissis –– “The witch lives in the suburbs of the Romanian capital, Bucharest, in a busy village with a Renaissance palace. There's a poster of her outside her house in Mogoșoaia: ‘The most powerful witch from Europe,’ the poster reads, ‘Mihaela Minca.’ ‘Welcome, welcome!’ she says, emerging through a beaded curtain at the front entrance. She's in a floor-length, black dress with bright flowers. Her hair, also black, is pulled back in a baby-blue headscarf. ‘I can solve any kind of problem — with love, success, anything,’ she insists, leading us to a dining room with gold-painted chairs that resemble thrones. ‘I am a witch who gets results.’ Minca, 42, says she's been practicing magic since she was 7. Both her mother and grandmother were witches. In the U.S., witches are usually only spotlighted on Halloween. But in Romania, witches have year-round work. A 2014 survey showed that two-thirds of people ‘believe in demons, curses, enchantments and spirits’ and that one in five believe witches have powers. To continue reading, visit the full article on NPR’s website. Kakissis, Joanna. “In The Land Of Dracula, Witches Work As 'Life Coaches' Of The Supernatural.” NPR. (October 24, 2018). <https://www.npr.org/2018/10/24/660294590/in-the-land-of-dracula-witches-work-as-life-coaches-of-the-supernatural>    
by E. Mee
Tuesday, November 6, 2018
The Startling Rise of India's #MeToo Movement 0 E. Mee By Sonali Kolhatkar ––   “The world’s largest democracy is finally having its own #MeToo moment. Just about a year after the Harvey Weinstein revelations opened the floodgates of assault accusations in the United States, India has been rocked by scandal after scandal over the span of a few weeks, arising from accusations made by women of sexual assault and harassment that are finally being taken seriously. As here in the U.S., it remains to be seen if this is a movement or a moment (to borrow a phrase associated with Black Lives Matter). For decades, Indian women have been protesting pervasive sexism, from street-level harassment, known by the inappropriate term ‘Eve-teasing,’ and Bollywood’s ‘casting couch’ to the two high-profile cases of brutal gang rapes that made international headlines in 2012 and 2018. But now, many women are feeling emboldened to come forward with their accounts of incidents that they have remained silent about for years. And some men are feeling the consequences of their actions in the form of public shaming and the loss of their jobs and positions—a similar phenomenon to what has unfolded in the U.S. over the past year.   …”  For more information, visit the full article on Truthdig’s website.  Kolhatkar, Sonali. “The Startling Rise of India's #MeToo Movement.” Truthdig. (October 24, 2018). <https://www.truthdig.com/articles/the-startling-rise-of-indias-metoo-movement/>
by E. Mee
Thursday, November 1, 2018
On This Matriarchal European Island, Ancient Customs Thrive 0 E. Mee By Rachel Brown — “A four-hour ferry ride off the coast of Estonia, the sunlit conifers and coastal meadows of Kihnu Island rise gently from the Baltic Sea. You can bike from one end to the other in half an hour. Its four villages house around 700 people—only two thirds of whom live there year-round—and there is no hotel. Yet the island receives 12 times more tourists per resident than some of the most visited places in the world. These tens of thousands of visitors don’t come for landmarks or amusement parks. Instead, they’re here to experience the unique culture of a place often touted as Europe’s last matriarchal society. 'Kihnu women have a very important role: to keep the cultural traditions,' says Mare Mätas, president of the Kihnu Cultural Space Foundation and a driving force in many community projects. 'They are taking care of the human life [cycle].' …” To continue reading, visit the full article on National Geographic’s website. Brown, Rachel. “On This Matriarchal European Island, Ancient Customs Thrive.” National Geographic. (October 18, 2018). <https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel/destinations/europe/estonia/pictures-kihnu-island-culture-matriarchy/?user.testname=none>
by E. Mee
Thursday, October 25, 2018
The Little College Where Tuition Is Free and Every Student Is Given a Job 0 E. Mee By Adam Harris —  “There’s a small burst of air that explodes from every clap. And when hundreds of people are clapping in unison, it begins to feel like a breeze—one that was pulsing through the Phelps Stokes Chapel at Berea College in Kentucky. The students and staff that had gathered here were stomping, clapping, and singing along, as they were led in a rendition of the Civil Rights era anthem, ‘Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around.’ They had packed into the wood-framed building for a convocation address, where the speaker, Diane White-Clayton, would be talking about 'Jesus, the Ultimate Rebel with a Cause.' Berea does not have a sectarian affiliation, but the remnants of its Christian foundation are readily apparent—so much so that, as Alicestyne Turley, a history professor at the college, told me, ‘we have students who come here who think they’re coming to a Christian college,’ à la Liberty University or Notre Dame. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on The Atlantic’s website. Harris, Adam. “The Little College Where Tuition Is Free and Every Student Is Given a Job.” The Atlantic. (October 11, 2018). <https://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2018/10/how-berea-college-makes-tuition-free-with-its-endowment/572644/>
by E. Mee
Thursday, October 25, 2018
A National Park Service Move That’s Un-American and Unconstitutional 0 E. Mee  By Petula Dvorak — “Try saying it — the Doritos March on Washington for Freedom. The Red Bull Rally for Refugee Rights! How about the Stayfree Protest for Women? All wrong. But that’s where we’re headed if yet another piece of the American experiment goes to the highest bidder. The latest item up for grabs in the yard sale of our nation’s soul is the constitutional right to protest. The National Park Service is considering charging demonstrators for use of the Mall, among a menu of other exhaustive restrictions. Everything from a small protest by teachers to a massive antiabortion march could cost thousands — even millions — of dollars to express First Amendment rights on land that the demonstrators, the taxpayers, already own. Crazy, right? The truth is, these events are huge disruptions to the city and a drain on tax dollars. Washington was paralyzed when hundreds of thousands of women and their supporters took over the Mall, the parks, the monuments, the streets during the Women’s March the day after Donald Trump’s inauguration in 2017. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on The Washington Post’s website. Dvorak, Petula. “A National Park Service Move That’s Completely Un-American and Unconstitutional.” The Washington Post.  (October 18, 2018). <https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/a-national-park-service-move-thats-completely-un-american-and-unconstitutional/2018/10/18/63402c08-d2d9-11e8-8c22-fa2ef74bd6d6_story.html?utm_term=.d0f9f69f840b>
by E. Mee
Wednesday, October 24, 2018
Sweet Home Café Cookbook Is a Fascinating Look at African American Cooking 0 E. Mee By Lisa Cericola— “The Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington D.C. isn’t just home to thousands of historical artifacts, documents, photography, and other media. The museum’s restaurant, Sweet Home Café, shows the many ways African Americans have shaped the way our country eats through dishes ranging from Fried Green Tomatoes to Senegalese Peanut Soup, to Hickory-Smoked Pork. Since the museum opened in 2016, the restaurant has become such a popular destination that it now has just released its own cookbook with more than 100 recipes from chefs Albert Lukas and Jerome Grant. Although the colorful, inviting photographs in Sweet Home Café Cookbook: A Celebration of African American Cooking will inspire you to get in the kitchen, the passages by culinary historian Jessica B. Harris will make you want to sit down and read. Through recipe descriptions and columns on signature ingredients (such as rice, peanuts, and oysters), Harris defines what African American food is. And it isn’t just Southern food. It’s Northern and Western food, too. It’s city food and it’s country food. And above all, it is global food, with roots that stretch all around the world, including Europe, South America, the Caribbean, and of course, Africa. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on Southern Living’s website. Cericola, Lisa. “A Delicious Recipe Collection With a Side of History.” Southern Living (October 2018). <https://www.southernliving.com/kitchen-assistant/sweet-home-cafe-cookbook>
by E. Mee
Wednesday, October 24, 2018
How Greenlanders Preserve Their Heritage Through Kayaking 0 E. Mee By Abby Sewell — “Cloaked in sealskin suits, a flock of kayakers cuts across a steely expanse of frigid water. A close observer might catch signs of modernity in the vessels’ construction and the kayakers’ attire, but from a distance, the image appears timeless. The world’s largest island, Greenland is a territory of Denmark, with its own government and a large degree of autonomy from the kingdom. Since Greenlanders voted for self-rule in 1979, they have been striving to forge a post-colonial identity. The signs of Danish influence endure, from the Scandinavian-style buildings painted in bold primary colors to the movement from a subsistence economy to a modern market system. But it also includes a revival of one of the most important aspects of the island’s Inuit legacy: the kayak. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on National Geographic’s website. Sewell, Abby. “How Greenlanders Preserve Their Heritage Through Kayaking.” National Geographic. (October 8, 2018). <https://relay.nationalgeographic.com/proxy/distribution/public/amp/travel/destinations/europe/greenland/pictures-national-kayaking-championship-heritage>
by E. Mee
Monday, October 15, 2018
Native American Imagery Is All Around Us, While People Are Often Forgotten 0 E. Mee By Mark Trahant —   “The problem began with one word: ‘America.’ That word, honoring Italian explorer Amerigo Vespucci, was coined in Europe in 1507, when it was used on a map of the New World. But back then, the only Americans were indigenous. It was our world, but it wasn’t our word. By the time the Declaration of Independence was signed in 1776, white people were simply referred to as ‘the Americans.’ My ancestors were called American Indians. It’s a label twisted by accidents of history: The Italian explorer who gets his name on two continents and another Italian, Christopher Columbus, who dubbed indigenous people ‘Indians,’ presumably because he thought he was in the East Indies. …”  To continue reading, visit the full article on National Geographic’s website. Trahant, Mark. “Native American Imagery Is All Around Us, While the People Are Often Forgotten.” National Geographic (October 5, 2018). <https://www.nationalgeographic.com/culture-exploration/2018/10/indigenous-peoples-day-cultural-appropriation/>
by E. Mee
Thursday, October 11, 2018
Before ‘Smallfoot’ and Bigfoot, Native Tribes Told Stories of Creatures 0 E. Mee By Craig Sailor —  “Visitors won’t find the words ‘myth’ or ‘story’ in a new Sasquatch exhibit at the White River Valley Museum. It’s not that the big hairy guy is treated as fact. It’s just that he’s treated with respect at the Auburn museum. ‘Sasquatch, Ancient Native Perspective on the Mysterious Beings of the Woods’ looks at the histories of Bigfoot-like creatures that lived, imagined or not, alongside the tribes of the Pacific Northwest. ‘Native cultures take these very seriously, and they continue to do so today,’ said curator Patricia Cosgrove. ‘By and large, people don’t talk about these.  …” To continue reading, visit the full article on The News Tribune’s website. Sailor, Craig. “Before ‘Smallfoot’ and Bigfoot, Native Tribes Told Stories of Child-Stealing Creatures of the Woods.” The News Tribune. (September 28, 2018). <http://amp.thenewstribune.com/news/local/article219134245.html>
by E. Mee
Thursday, October 11, 2018
Netflix Partners With Inaugural Smithsonian African American Film Festival 0 E. Mee By Nate Nickolai — “The Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture announced on Tuesday that it will partner with Netflix in preparation for its inaugural Smithsonian African American Film Festival this October. As part of the partnership, Netflix will also screen its upcoming documentary ‘Quincy’ at the fest. ‘The museum is pleased to collaborate with Netflix in order to explore important moments in the history of America through the African American lens,’ said founding director Lonnie G. Bunch III. ‘We are pleased the first production of Netflix is a film that honors Quincy Jones, whose creativity and commitment to racial justice is an example of the best of America.’ The biannual festival, which will take place from Oct. 24 to Oct. 27, will include works from both veteran and new filmmakers, alongside historic films that celebrate African American life. The fest will also feature a film competition, movie screenings from the museum’s own collection, and other national film premieres. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on Variety’s website. Nickolai, Nate. “Netflix Partners With Inaugural Smithsonian African American Film Festival.” Variety. (September 18, 2018). <https://variety.com/2018/film/news/quincy-netflix-smithsonian-african-american-film-festival-1202946833/>
by E. Mee
Thursday, October 11, 2018
The Dad-Joke Doctrine 0 E. Mee By Ashley Fetters — “It would be difficult to make the case that the ‘guy who died in the round barn’ joke, a classic Midwest joke, is funny in its own right—though I would argue it’s pretty funny how much my dad still loves telling it. Which makes it a shining example of one of America’s great familial oral traditions: the dad joke. In recent years, the mass-sharing capabilities of the internet have facilitated a renewed (eye-rolling, faux-begrudging) appreciation of the dad joke. The Reddit page r/dadjokes, a forum where users go to share and enjoy ‘the jokes that make you laugh and cringe in equal measure,’ has more than 1 million subscribers and amasses several new posts every hour. The online video series Dad Jokes, which pits comedians and celebrities against each other in dad-joke-telling competitions where ‘if you laugh you lose,’ launched in 2017 and today has some 999,000 followers on Facebook. Twitter users, meanwhile, frequently call each other (and themselves) out for their simplest and squeaky-cleanest puns by tweeting ‘#dadjoke.’ …” To continue reading, visit the full article on The Atlantic’s website. Fetters, Ashley. “The Dad-Joke Doctrine.” The Atlantic. (September 25, 2018). <https://www.theatlantic.com/family/archive/2018/09/deconstructing-the-dad-joke/571174/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=atlantic-weekly-newsletter&utm_content=20180928&silverid-ref=MzEwMTkwMjU0MzA1S0>  
by E. Mee
Thursday, October 11, 2018
At the Cowboy Poetry Gathering, Tall Tales, Resonant Rhymes 0 E. Mee By Chris Wohlwend —  “As a sellout crowd jostled its way into the first big show of the 34th annual National Cowboy Poetry Gathering on a late-January night in Elko, Nev., old friends backslapped each other and laughed about past gatherings. It was a rowdy, good-natured opening of what has become the premier celebration of The Cowboy Way. The atmosphere was not surprising — Elko, population about 18,000, sits in the northeastern corner of Nevada, an oasis in the Great Basin’s high-desert terrain and the center of the area’s ranching lifestyle. And the gathering commemorates the end-of-the-cattle-drive festivities that defined the Old West, with camaraderie and all that the term encompasses: tall tales, poetry and songs, dancing, gambling, thick steaks and strong drinks. …” To continue reading, visit the full article on The New York Times’s website. Wohlwend, Chris. “At the Cowboy Poetry Gathering, Tall Tales, Resonant Rhymes.” The New York Times (September 26, 2018). <https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/26/travel/cowboy-poetry-gathering-nevada.html>
by E. Mee
Monday, October 8, 2018

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