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Results of MEMORIAMEDIA Project Now Available 0 S. Larson Intangible Cultural Heritage: MEMORIAMEDIA e-Museum: Methods, Techniques and Practices by Filomena Sousa (MI Portugal, 2015) is now available as a free download (in both English and in Portuguese): http://www.memoriamedia.net/index.php/pci-e-memoriamedia. MEMORIAMEDIA aims to study, inventory and disseminate manifestations of intangible cultural heritage. These include oral expressions, performative practices, celebrations, traditional craftsmanship and knowledge concerning nature and the universe. The results of the project are organized as a national inventory and published on http://www.memoriamedia.net, where they are freely available for consultation and sharing. MEMORIAMEDIA began in 2006, in the midst of a broad national and international discussion regarding the issues of intangible cultural heritage. This book crosses such theoretical, methodological and technical questions with the characterization of MEMORIAMEDIA. Filomena Sousa is a Postdoctoral researcher in Anthropology (FCSH/UNL) and holds a PhD in Sociology (ISCTE-IUL). She is a member of the FCSH/UNL "Institute for the Study of Literature and Tradition - heritage, arts and cultures" (IELT - Portugal) and an adviser of the Memória Imaterial – the non-governmental organization that created and manages the MEMORIAMEDIA project. She develops research projects in the context of policies and instruments for identifying, documenting and safeguarding intangible cultural heritage and has directed several documentaries about cultural expressions.
by S. Larson
Wednesday, November 25, 2015
Documentary on the Origin of Halloween Selected for Babel Film Festival 0 S. Larson Spiorad na Samhna (Spirit of Samhain) – a documentary film on the origin of Halloween – has been selected for the Babel Film Festival – an international festival that promotes minority languages. Babel will take place in Sardinia, Italy, in early December. In this year's program, featured languages range from Cree, Innu and Kurdish to Sámi, Swahili and Yazidi, and include European languages like Basque, Welsh, Catalan, Ladin and Sardu. Spiorad na Samhna traces the origins of Ireland's biggest Halloween Carnival in Derry back to the troubled years of the 1980s. It also traces the origins of Halloween itself to the Celtic festival of Samhain. Dr. Jenny Butler, from the Folklore Department at University College Cork, narrates the film. Earlier this year, Spiorad na Samhna won Best Short Documentary Award at the Underground Film Festival in Cork, Ireland. It can be viewed at https://vimeo.com/101398600. 
by S. Larson
Thursday, November 19, 2015
New Book Examines Scandinavian Seasonal Customs in the Rocky Mountain West 0 S. Larson In Pole Raising and Speech Making: Modalities of Swedish American Summer Celebration, author Jennifer Eastman Attebery focuses on the beginnings of the traditional Scandinavian Midsummer celebration and the surrounding spring-to-summer seasonal festivities in the Rocky Mountain West during the height of Swedish immigration to the area--1880-1917.   Combining research in folkloristics and history, Attebery explores various ways that immigrants blended traditional Swedish Midsummer-related celebrations with local civic celebrations of American Independence Day on July 4 and the Mormons' Pioneer Day on July 24. Functioning as multimodal observances with multiple meanings, these holidays represent and reconsider ethnicity and panethnicity, sacred and secular relationships, and the rural and the urban, demonstrating how flexible and complex traditional celebrations can be. Providing a wealth of detail and information surrounding little-studied celebrations and valuable archival and published primary sources--diaries, letters, speeches, newspaper reports, and images--Pole Raising and Speech Making is proof that non-English immigrant culture must be included when discussing "American" culture. It will be of interest to scholars and graduate students in ethnic studies, folklore, ritual and festival studies, and Scandinavian American cultural history. Cloth: $39.95 Adobe Digital Edition Ebook*: $31.95 ISBN: 978-0-87421-998-2 Pages: 208 Illustrations: 17   The book can be ordered at: https://cdcshoppingcart.uchicago.edu /cart/ChicagoBook.aspx?ISBN=978-0-87421-998-2&press=utah_state. The Press is having an anniversary sale, so use promo code 50FOR50 at check out to get 50% off.
by S. Larson
Tuesday, November 10, 2015
Call for Recipes for Ethnic American Cooking 0 S. Larson Lucy M. Long, director of the Center for Food and Culture in Bowling Green, Ohio, is compiling a cookbook, Ethnic American Cooking, based on the 2-volume encyclopedia, Ethnic American Food. The cookbook reprints recipes from the encyclopedia, but some ethnic groups still need recipes representing them. Dishes selected should be significant to the ethnic group in some way, and recipes can illustrate the processes of adaptation and acculturation that occur in the U.S. (That means substitutions for hard-to-find ingredients are included.) Long is looking for individuals who have familiarity with these food cultures and the ways in which they are being adapted in the U.S. to submit recipes. (They will receive a free copy of the cookbook--$38 value.)  Collaborations are welcome, and recipes based on ethnographic fieldwork or personal experience are ideal. An e-book version can include videos demonstrating the recipes. The deadline for recipes is Nov. 29, 2015. Please email LucyL@foodandculture.org if you are interested in any of the nationalities below. This list focuses on African cultures, but there are others needed as well. Africa--eastern: Comoros, Djibouti, Mauritius, Mayotte, Mozambique, Reunion, Seychelles, Zimbabwe Africa--middle: Angola, Central African Republic (CAR), Equatorial guinea, SaoTome & Principe Africa—southern: Botswana, Namibia, Swaziland Africa—western: Burkina Faso, Cape Verde, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Saint Helena Africa—northern: Libya, Western Sahara
by S. Larson
Tuesday, November 10, 2015
Mississippi Folklife Goes Digital 0 S. Larson Mississippi Folklife, a project of the Mississippi Arts Commission, has re-imagined its earlier print publication as a digital journal that will feature publications on contemporary Mississippi folklife and cultural heritage. To learn more about the publication, visit http://www.mississippifolklife.org/about.
by S. Larson
Tuesday, November 10, 2015
AIR Launches Localore: Finding America 0 S. Larson Localore: Finding America is “a network of journalism experiments designed to create new storytelling models and connect new audiences to public media with principal funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting” (CPB Media Room). Localore: Finding America consists of 15 projects that will focus on communities across the United States whose voices are underrepresented in the media. To learn more about the project, see: CPB Media Room: http://www.cpb.org/pressroom/release.php?prn=1259 Air Productions: http://airmedia.org/localore/  
by S. Larson
Friday, November 06, 2015
The Atlantic Explores “The Tragic, Forgotten History of Zombies” 0 S. Larson In "The Tragic, Forgotten History of Zombies,” Mike Mariani takes a look at the history of the zombie from its Haitian roots to its popularity in American popular culture.   The article can be accessed at http://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2015/10/how-america-erased-the-tragic-history-of-the-zombie/412264/?utm_source=nl__link3_103015.  
by S. Larson
Monday, November 02, 2015
University of Texas Press Republishes Indian Tales of North America 0 S. Larson Tristram Potter Coffin’s Indian Tales of North America: An Anthology for the Adult Reader, which is Volume 13 of the American Folklore Society Bibliographical and Special Series, is once again available from the University of Texas Press. It will be published as a paperback through the Press’s print-on-demand program and also as an e-book. The AFS will receive royalties for any copies that are sold.   To learn more about the book, or to order a copy, visit http://utpress.utexas.edu/index.php/books/coffin-indian-tales-of-north-america.
by S. Larson
Monday, November 02, 2015
"Academia, Not Edu" Post Exposes Threat to Open Access 0 S. Larson Kathleen Fitzpatrick, associate executive director and director of scholarly communication for the Modern Language Association, recently published a blog post expressing her concerns about Academia.edu – a popular, social networking site, which allows scholars to connect and circulate their academic works. While Fitzpatrick praises the spirit of open access facilitated by this model, she exposes Academic.edu as a non-educationally affiliated "dot-com” that is actually a "hindrance to the flourishing of other mechanisms for author-side sharing of work such as institutional repositories.” Follow the link below to read the full post: Fitzpatrick, Kathleen. "Academic, Not Edu.” Planned Obsolescence. Weblog. 26 October 2015. http://www.plannedobsolescence.net/academia-not-edu/.
by S. Larson
Thursday, October 29, 2015
Clifford Murphy on the Greatness of Local Culture 0 S. Larson While at the 2015 National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) Heritage Fellowship events, NEA Folk & Traditional Arts Director Clifford Murphy was inspired to reflect on the greatness of local culture. According to Murphy: When we go looking for culture, no matter where we're from, we can find ourselves drawn towards people and traditions 'from away.' We can forget that culture resides in our own neighborhoods, and even within each of us. If this becomes habit, we can fail to recognize when we are in the presence of greatness, simply because it doesn't look like we thought it might... To read more, take a look at the full article: "Inherently Local Greatness.” ARTmatters: National Endowment for the Arts Monthly Newsletter (October 2015). https://www.arts.gov/article/inherently-local-greatness.   For more articles like this one, you can subscribe to the NEA's main e-newsletter, ARTmatters,here.
by S. Larson
Thursday, October 29, 2015
Should We Be Carving Turnips for Halloween? 0 S. Larson In this BBC video, Historian Michael Carter discusses a little-known Halloween tradition - turnip carving: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0369vcb.
by S. Larson
Tuesday, October 27, 2015
Norway Has a New Passion: Ghost Hunting 0 S. Larson Ghost belief is thriving in Norway! Read about the country's fascination with the spirit world at http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/25/world/europe/for-many-norwegians-ghosts-fill-a-void.html?emc=edit_tnt_20151025&nlid=58536034&tntemail0=y&_r=0.
by S. Larson
Monday, October 26, 2015
Banjo Legend Bill Keith Passes Away 0 S. Larson Read about Bill Keith's impact as a banjo player in Bluegrass Today at http://bluegrasstoday.com/bill-keith-passes/.
by S. Larson
Monday, October 26, 2015
The History of Guy Fawkes Day, or Pope's Day 0 S. Larson Learn about the meaning behind Guy Fawkes Day and its Colonial American counterpart - Pope's Day: http://mobile.nytimes.com/2015/10/25/nyregion/remembering-guy-fawkes-day-or-popes-day.html?emc=edit_tnt_20151024&nlid=58536034&tntemail0=y&referer=&_r=0.
by S. Larson
Monday, October 26, 2015
Participate in the Concealed Revealed Project 0 S. Larson Dr. Ceri Houlbrook of the University of Manchester and Dr. Owen Davies of the University of Hertfordshire are researching concealed objects and the folklore of domestic apotropaic devices (e.g. concealed shoes, mummified cats, timber markings). This is part of the Leverhulme-funded "Inner Lives: Emotion, Identity, and the Supernatural, 1300-1900” Project at the University of Hertfordshire. As well as wanting to catalogue as many objects as they can across the British Isles, the researchers are hoping to speak with modern-day finders to see what becomes of these concealed objects once they're revealed, how their biographies continue, and how their folklore changes. If you have any interest in this subject or know of any concealed objects, please get in touch or take a look at the project website (https://theconcealedrevealed.wordpress.com/) or Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/concealedrevealed). 
by S. Larson
Monday, October 26, 2015
Traditional Craft Skills Aid Children with Heart Defects 0 S. Larson Check out this BBC article about Bolivian women who apply their knitting expertise to help make high-tech medical tools that can repair children's heart defects: http://www.bbc.com/news/health-32076070.
by S. Larson
Thursday, October 22, 2015
Neil Rosenberg Wins Association for Recorded Sound Collections Award 0 S. Larson The Association for Recorded Sound Collections (ARSC) has announced the 2015 winners of the ARSC Awards for Excellence in Historical Recorded Sound Research. AFS member, Neil Rosenberg and his co-authors, won the Best History Award in the category "Best Historical Research in Recorded Country, Folk, or World Music” for their book, Bluegrass Hall of Fame Inductee Biographies, 1991-2014. The book has been produced by the International Bluegrass Music Museum, and it details the histories of all of the Hall of Fame inductees. To learn more about the awards and to see a full list of the 2015 winners, go to: http://www.arsc-audio.org/awards/awards.html http://www.arsc-audio.org/awards/people.html
by S. Larson
Thursday, October 22, 2015
Moses and Frances Asch Collection Named to UNESCO’s Memory of the World 0 S. Larson The Smithsonian’s Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage recently announced that the Moses and Frances Asch Collection has been selected for UNESCO’s Memory of the World International Register! To learn more, visit http://newsdesk.si.edu/releases/moses-and-frances-asch-collection-named-unesco-s-memory-world-international-register.
by S. Larson
Thursday, October 22, 2015
Director of the Museum of International Folk Art Steps Down on a High Note 0 S. Larson Marsha Bol, director of the Museum of International Folk Art, is about to retire with a flourish. Read about her final triumph at the Museum and other highlights of her career in The Santa Fe New Mexican: http://www.santafenewmexican.com/life/features/sunday-spotlight-folk-art-museum-director-going-out-on-top/article_6943cd4c-b60c-51a6-9afe-59095e6515d5.html  
by S. Larson
Monday, October 05, 2015
"Tomorrow We Disappear" Documents Final Days of a New Delhi Artists' Colony 0 S. Larson Tomorrow We Disappear is a documentary film about the final days of Kathputli, an artists’ colony in New Delhi. The film follows Puran the Puppeteer, Rahman the Magician, and Maya the Acrobat over the course of three years as they prepare to be evicted from Kathputli, which has been sold to developers. Find out more about the film here: http://www.aljazeera.com/programmes/witness/2015/09/150930141933079.html http://www.twdfilm.com  
by S. Larson
Monday, October 05, 2015

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