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December 2012 Issue of RMN Newsletter 0 R. Vanscoyoc The latest issue of RMN Newsletter is here! We hope that the range of short, discussion-oriented articles, announcements, reports and information will offer something of interest to all of you. The issue is freely available on-line at: http://www.helsinki.fi/folkloristiikka/English/RMN/current.htm We would also like to draw attention to the Call for Papers for a special issue, "Limited Sources, Boundless Possibilities: Textual Scholarship and the Challenges of Oral and Written Texts," to appear in December 2013, with guest editors Karina Lukin (University of Helsinki) and Sakari Katajamäki (Finnish Literature Society). Our first special issue, "Approaching Methodology" (May 2012), was a great success (printed 2nd edition forthcoming). We anticipate that "Limited Sources, Boundless Possibilities" will prove still more stimulating for international multidisciplinary discussion and we look forward to your participation.
by R. Vanscoyoc
Tuesday, January 08, 2013
Alan Lomax interviewed by Charles Kuralt, 1991 0 L. Cashman http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUHBQIqOyKxZ9eQ5LIx0nxjWGjgjEk2Ha&feature=edit_ok
by L. Cashman
Monday, December 17, 2012
Folklore at Penn in The Daily Pennsylvanian 0 L. Cashman Posted on publore:http://www.thedp.com/article/2012/12/finding-a-home-for-folklore-at-penn"Finding a home for folklore at Penn," by Sara Schonfeld, in the Daily Pennsylvanian,  the University of Pennsylvania’s independent student news organization, on 12/4/2012.Then check out the ensuing discussion in December 2012, week 2, in the the publore archive at https://list.unm.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A1=ind1212b&L=publore.
by L. Cashman
Monday, December 17, 2012
Center for Food and Culture, 2013 Foodways Calendar Available 0 L. Cashman From Lucy Long:Hi everyone,I wanted to let everyone know about the non-profit (pending status) Center for Food and Culture that I started a year ago, with some help from AFS and numerous other folklorists. We're putting out a calendar for 2013 that includes photographs by a number of Publore participants, and I wanted to let everyone know about the calendar's availability. It's based on folkloristic approaches to food and foodways. The information about the calendar is below. And if anyone wants to know more about the Center, I'm always happy to talk about it. The website is: www.foodandculture.org.Thanks,Lucy LongThe Center for Food and Culture’s 2013 Foodways Calendar is now available. Containing photos of food and food activities from around the world, the calendar offers "food for thought” every month that helps us recognize the myriad ways in which food connects us all. Photographs have been contributed by Center friends, and more information on each is on our website (www.foodandculture.org). Also on the website is discussion about the themes for each month, recipes, and interactive discussion groups.Calendars cost $24.95 and can be purchased by credit card through our website or by check. While there, you can also register for free as a member of the Center.Checks should be made payable to Center for Food and Culture and mailed to:Center for Food and Culture, P.O. Box 486, Bowling Green, OH   43402.  Non-profit status is pending for the Center. We also signed up for Kickstarter to get initial funding for the calendar.Note—the website still shows the 2012 calendar. Ignore this! We know it’s year 2013 coming up and that’s the calendar you want.For more information, contact: Lucy Long, Director, Center for Food and Culture, LucyL@foodandculture.org.
by L. Cashman
Monday, December 17, 2012
Negotiating Tradition, by Stefan Groth 0 L. Cashman Stefan Groth's "Negotiating Tradition: The Pragmatics of International Deliberations on Cultural Property,” volume 4 of Göttingen Studies in Cultural Property, has just been published with Göttingen University Press. It can be ordered in paperback from this website:http://www.univerlag.uni-goettingen.de/content/list.php?details=isbn-978-3-86395-100-9and is also available for download via a Creative Commons license.
by L. Cashman
Monday, December 17, 2012
Heritage Regimes and the State, edited by Bendix, Eggert, Peselmann 0 L. Cashman Heritage Regimes and the State has just been published with Göttingen University Press. It can be ordered in paperback from this website http://www.univerlag.uni-goettingen.de/content/list.php?q=Bendix&cat=result and is, from the same site, also available for free download via a Creative Commons license. For the table of contents, see below. DFG-Research Group on Cultural Property Georg-August-Universität Göttingen Humboldtallee 19 37073 Göttingen http://cultural-property.uni-goettingen.de/ -------------- Regina Bendix; Aditya Eggert & Arnika Peselmann (eds.), 2012. Heritage Regimes and the State. Göttingen: Universitätsverlag Göttingen. CONTENTS Regina F. Bendix, Aditya Eggert and Arnika Peselmann: Introduction: Heritage Regimes and the State Kristin Kuutma: Between Arbitration and Engineering Concepts and Contingencies in the Shaping of Heritage Regimes THE REACH OF (POST-)COLONIAL SENTIMENT AND CONTROL Adelheid Pichler: The Dynamics of Heritage Choice and Heritage Regimes in the "Making of Old Havana” Maria Cardeira da Silva: Castles Abroad. Nations, Culture and Cosmopolitanisms in African Heritage Sites of Portuguese Origin Philip W. Scher: Uneasy Heritage: Ambivalence and Ambiguity in Caribbean Heritage Practices Anaïs Leblon: A Policy of Intangible Cultural Heritage between Local Constraints and International Standards: "The Cultural Space of the yaaral and the degal LAYERS OF PRESERVATION REGIMES AND STATE POLITICS Katia Ballacchino: Unity Makes…Intangible Heritage: Italy and Network Nomination Cristina Sánchez-Carretero: Heritage Regimes and the Camino de Santiago: Gaps and Logics Máiréad Nic Craith: Heritage Politics and Neglected Traditions: A Case-Study of Skellig Michael Nicolas Adell: The French Journeymen Tradition: Convergence between French Heritage Traditions and UNESCO’s 2003 Convention Markus Tauschek: The Bureaucratic Texture of National Patrimonial Policies Gabriele Mentges: The Role of UNESCO and the Uzbek Nation Building Process Ullrich Kockel: Borders, European Integration and UNESCO World Heritage: A Case Study of the Curonian Spit STATES AND THEIR ‘THING’: SELECTION, PROCESSES, ADMINISTRATIVE STRUCTURES, AND EXPERT KNOWLEDGE Caroline Bodolec: The Chinese Paper-Cut: From Local Inventories to the UNESCO Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity Chiara Bortolotto: The French Inventory of Intangible Cultural Heritage: Domesticating a Global Paradigm into French Heritage Regime Alessandra Broccolini: Intangible Cultural Heritage Scenarios within the Bureaucratic Italian State Florence Graezer Bideau: Identifying "Living Traditions” in Switzerland: Re-enacting Federalism through the UNESCO Convention for the Safeguarding of Intangible Cultural Heritage Laurent-Sébastien Fournier: Intangible Cultural Heritage in France: From State Culture to Local Development Jean-Louis Tornatore: Anthropology’s Payback: "The Gastronomic Meal of the French”. The Ethnographic Elements of a Heritage Distinction CLOSING COMMENTARIES Donald L. Brenneis: Sand, Stability and Stakeholders Rosemary J. Coombe: Managing Cultural Heritage as Neoliberal Governmentality Laurajane Smith: Discussion A COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT Chiara De Cesari: Thinking Through Heritage Regimes
by L. Cashman
Friday, December 07, 2012
AFS member discount on Where the Rivers Meet the Sea, by Stephanie C. Kane 0 L. Cashman Temple University Press is proud to announce the publication of Where Rivers Meet the Sea by Stephanie C. Kane. A creative, narrative approach to the issue of environmental destruction in urban waterscapes, Where Rivers Meet the Sea focuses on neighborhood activists who pressure their governments to follow existing law in the South Atlantic. To read a sample chapter or to learn more information on the book, please visits its webpage at http://www.temple.edu/tempress/titles/2231_reg.html.Temple University Press is offering AFS members a 20% discount on the book until March 31, 2013. If you are interested in ordering the book, contact Lorraine Walsh Cashman at cashman.11@osu.edu for the promo code.
by L. Cashman
Monday, December 03, 2012
Full archive of Italian Culture available online 0 L. Cashman Full back archive of Italian Culture available online The American Association for Italian Studies (AAIS) and Maney Publishing are pleased to announce that the full back archive of Italian Culture, dating back to 1978, is now available in electronic format at IngentaConnect: www.ingentaconnect.com/content/maney/itc Thirty years’ worth of content (1978-2008) has been scanned and digitized. As a means of easy access to previously-published articles and reviews, of which few subscribers will have print copies, we expect this to be a resource of major importance to institutional subscribers and a considerable enhancement of the benefits of subscription. Please see the Journal’s homepage for subscription information:www.maneypublishing.com/journals/itcSenior Editor, Joseph Francese, comments: ‘This development allows scholars of Italian studies across multiple disciplines to have at their immediate disposition out-of-print issues, as well as the opportunity to experience the evolution of Italian studies over the past four decades’.Selected content is available online free of charge at: www.ingentaconnect.com/content/maney/itc To sign up for free table of content alerts, please see: www.maneypublishing.com/online/tocs
by L. Cashman
Friday, November 30, 2012
New Laborlore website on the Cultures of Icelandic Workers 0 L. Cashman For those interested in Laborlore/Worker's Culture, and also in the America Works/Occupational Folklife initiative of the American Folklife Center, here's a link to an AFC-inspired website that came out of a public folklore class Jim Leary taught in 2012 while on a Fulbright in the Folkloristics and Ethnology Department at the University of Iceland. The class also created an archival collection, held a public event with the workers, and will produce a half hour show on the topic, in Icelandic, for the national radio station. The website is in Icelandic and in English.http://knitbird.com/folklore/
by L. Cashman
Friday, November 30, 2012
Folklore Recycled: Old Traditions in New Contexts, by Frank de Caro 0 L. Cashman New book: Folklore Recycled: Old Traditions in New Contexts by Frank de Caro University Press of Mississippi, casebound (ISBN 978-1-61703-764-1) and ebook (ISBN 978-1-61703-765-8), $55.00. Folklore Recycled discusses the larger issue of folklore being recycled into non-folk contexts and looks at a number of instances in which folklore has been "repurposed." This recycling process may take place in literary and artistic contexts and for philosophical as well as personal reasons, ranging from the use of folklore in novels to its use in tourism, interior decoration, and promoting international relations. Because today many people are less likely to encounter folklore in its traditional contexts than in other media, the book argues, it behooves folklorists to give increasing attention to folklore in "new" places.
by L. Cashman
Friday, November 30, 2012
AIDS quilt in Qualia Encyclopedia of Gay Folklife 0 L. Cashman A collaborative effort between Marsha McDowell, Mike Smith, and Mickey Weems, the Qualia Encyclopedia of Gay Folklife is happy to present the article on the AIDS Quilt: http://www.qualiafolk.com/2011/12/08/the-quilt/
by L. Cashman
Friday, November 30, 2012
Hand Crafted Art Traditions, online gallery/shop 0 L. Cashman From https://handcraftedarttraditions.com/:Handcrafted Art Traditions is an online gallery of folk and traditional arts and crafts. We specialize in works created by artists living in the American West. Currently, the states of Colorado, Oregon, Washington, and Utah are represented. We will continue to add artists from these and other western states.Georgia Wier, a folklorist, founded Handcrafted Art Traditions after years of representing folk and traditional artists as an employee for arts agencies and museums. While Georgia was working in rural Colorado, artists asked her "Can’t you help us sell our art?” These questions led Georgia to begin thinking about the need for a new sales outlet for traditional artists living in the western states. Handcrafted Art Traditions is the result, introducing exceptional folk and traditional artists and their work to those of you seeking art that is closely tied to the land or cultural traditions in the West.
by L. Cashman
Friday, November 30, 2012
2012 Tribal Canoe Journey in NEA Arts Magazine 0 L. Cashman The National Endowment for the Arts has highlighted the Evergreen StateCollege Longhouse and Squaxin Island Tribe's successful hosting of the2012 Tribal Canoe Journey in a recent magazine article:http://www.arts.gov/about/NEARTS/2012_v3/webf/tribal/index.html
by L. Cashman
Friday, November 30, 2012
Journal of Ethnology and Folkloristics 5:2 content online 0 L. Cashman The Journal of Ethnology and Folkloristics has recently published online its latest issue at http://www.jef.ee/index.php/journal. Review the Table of Contents below and visit journal's website to download articles.Journal of Ethnology and FolkloristicsVol. 5, No. 2 (2011)Table of Contentshttp://www.jef.ee/index.php/journal/issue/view/8Articles----------Wrestling on the Table: The Contemporary Wedding Meal in Latvia (pp. 3-18) Astra SpalvēnaMy Home Is My Stage: Restaurant Experiences in Two Estonian Lifestyle Enterprises (pp. 19-47) Ester Võsu, Anu KannikeReflections on the Metacultural Nature of Intangible Cultural Heritage (pp. 49-64) Markus TauschekIdentity Struggles of Museum Professionals: Autonomous Expertise and Audience Participation in Exhibition Production (pp. 65-80) Taavi TatsiThe Socio-Cultural Effects of Banning Traditional Midwives from Attending Homebirth in Romania (pp. 81-90) Adina HulubasThe Role of the Repeat in the Bear Feast in Traditional Khanty Culture (pp. 91-99) Anna A. Grinevich (Zorkoltseva)Notes and Reviews------------------------Taking Sides: Ethics, Politics and Fieldwork in Anthropology & All Tomorrow's Cultures: Anthropological Engagements with the Future (pp. 100-101) Aimar VentselArctic  Discourses (pp. 102-103) Aimar Ventsel
by L. Cashman
Friday, November 30, 2012
Epic: Form, Content, and History, by Frederick Turner 0 R. Vanscoyoc Just Published! Is epic as an art formdead? ISBN: 978-1-4128-4944-9 (cloth)384 pp. $39.95 eISBN: 978-1-4128-4895-4 It's said that every great story has already been written. According to Frederick Turner, this is true. Every story is simply a new interpretation of the original story: the epic. The common themes in epic literature--the miraculous birth of the hero, the creation myth, the founding of the city, the quest journey--are universal and appear in all stories, no matter the geographical, historical, or cultural differences. This is because epic is the first story and the only story central to human existence: it is the story of human evolution. In this way, epic is the origin of all other literature. Though modernists and proponents of the novel form have argued for more than sixty years that the epic is dead, considering it no more than a primitive storytelling method that humans have since evolved beyond, Turner sees epic as in fact the most fundamental and important of all the literary forms, one that deserves serious critical attention. Epic themes and motifs thrive in the cultural genres of Marvel Comics, gothic, anime, manga, multi-user role-playing games, and superhero movies. Considering the popular reemergence of epic characters and plotlines, as evidenced in The Wizard of Oz, Star Wars, The Lord of the Rings, Lost, The Matrix, Superman, Harry Potter, and the Narnia tales, there is no doubt that epic remains undeniably alive and well. Read More Obtain Review Copy (media only) Click Here To Order Contact TA for Rights and Permissions Information About the Author Frederick Turner is Founders Professor, School of Arts and Humanities at the University of Texas at Dallas. A poet, translator, philosopher, cultural critic, and former editor of the Kenyon Review, he has authored more than two dozen books, including Beauty, The Culture of Hope, Genesis, Hadean Eclogues, Shakespeare's Twenty-First Century Economics, and Natural Religion. Professor Turner may be reached for interviews by phone (214) 213-8581 or e-mail frederick.turner@gmail.com.Praise for Epic "Turner's overwhelming advantage in writing about epics is that he is one of our great contemporary poets in that genre. It is as though we equipped Tasso or Vergil with a polymath education in the physical, evolutionary, and social sciences and asked them to use this knowledge to tell us what they were doing. Turner understands that they would come to the same conclusion he does: there are not many epics, there is one epic and that is the story of human evolutionary history from the creation of mankind to the creation of the city, and everything on the way (visit to the dead) and after (destruction and recreation). This story of epic is an epic journey in itself: a tribal encyclopedia for latter-day tribesmen. Brilliantly and expertly told it is not to be missed at any cost." --Robin Fox, professor of social theory, Rutgers University, and author of The Tribal Imagination: Civilization and the Savage Mind "There is something almost majestic about Frederick Turner's Epic, the best study ever composed about this foundational literary genre.The range is formidable: from ancient and classical works to twentieth-century literary achievements, from Europe and the Mediterranean to Africa, East Asia, and South America. This is, unquestionably, the main, the true, and the genuine way in which globalism can and ought to be understood: through the commonalities of ideal aspirations, and the memories and images of all members of the human family. Turner, once again, proves himself a reliable guide in the philosophical grasp of human culture." --Virgil Nemoianu, W. J. Byron Distinguished Professor of Literature and professor of philosophy, The Catholic University of America Review Copies and Ordering Information Obtain a Review Copy (Media Only): Editors interested in reviewing this book can forward the request along with company information to marketing@transactionpub.com or fax us on your company letterhead at (732) 445-2782 and include: Book Title Review Editor and Publication/MediaAddress Business Contact Number E-mail Address Ordering Information: To order a copy of Epic, contact Transaction Publishers at 888-999-6778 or order online at http://www.transactionpub.com.
by R. Vanscoyoc
Friday, November 16, 2012
Blair Pathways: A Musical Exploration of America's Largest Labor Uprising 0 L. Cashman From publore:Here is a review of an important new piece of folklife research, the Blair Pathways CD, newly uncovered music sung and played around the time of the West Virginia Mine Wars (1900-1921), performed by contemporary artists. See http://www.blairpathways.com/. If you like "I Owe My Soul to the Company Store," you may be interested in The Company Store, written with wit and relish in 1895, and recorded on the new Blair Pathways CD.http://socialistworker.org/2012/11/13/songs-for-the-mountain
by L. Cashman
Wednesday, November 14, 2012
"Endowing Power": Notes on the 2012 AFS Annual Meeting 0 R. Vanscoyoc Rachael Hudak, Associate Editor of the Journal of Ordinary Thought, has written a thoughtful recap of AFS's 2012 annual meeting in New Orleans. You can find it at http://www.jot.org/blog/2012/11/06/endowing-power-2/.
by R. Vanscoyoc
Monday, November 12, 2012
"Day of the Dead--Experience the Tradition" App Available 0 R. Vanscoyoc Check it out here: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/day-dead-experience-tradition/id497953588?mt=8 
by R. Vanscoyoc
Monday, November 12, 2012
Drop on Down in Florida: Field Recordings of Af. Am. Traditional Music 0 L. Cashman The Florida Folklife Progam is pleased to announce the upcoming release of Drop on Down in Florida: Field Recordings of African American Traditional Music, 1977 – 1980 on November 6th. The Folklife Program has produced the book/CD set as part of an exciting collaboration with the State Archives of Florida and Dust-to-Digital, an award-winning record label based in Atlanta known for specially packaged releases of American vernacular music. It is an expanded reissue of a double-LP released by the Florida Folklife Program in 1981 titled Drop on Down in Florida: Recent Field Recordings of Afro-American Traditional Music.The original two-record LP was based on four years of fieldwork conducted by the Florida Folklife Program on African American traditional music throughout the state. It highlighted different forms of African American musical expression, especially the blues and sacred music traditions, for a statewide public audience. Drawing upon extensive fieldwork materials now housed in the State Archives of Florida, the reissue consists of 2 CDs featuring all 27 tracks from the original LP, plus approximately 80 previously unreleased minutes of music. Notable among these tracks are additional selections and personal narratives from one-string musician Moses Williams, four-shape-note Sacred Harp singing from African American communities in the Florida Panhandle, and recordings from multiple artists in the blues and gospel-blues traditions.In addition, the reissue includes a 224-page hardbound book with the double-LP’s original, revised, and expanded essays and liner notes, along with new essays, annotations, and 60 black-and-white images from the State Archives of Florida, most of which are being published for the first time. The images present the folk artists and communities that perpetuated the musical traditions documented through Florida Folklife Program fieldwork. Also featured in the set are new track notes from respected music scholars David Evans and Doris J. Dyen; reflective essays from past and present folklorists with the Florida Folklife Program, including Peggy A. Bulger, Dwight DeVane, and current State Folklorist Blaine Waide; and an extensive essay on African American one-string instrument traditions by David Evans. The 2012 edition highlights the significance of the previously unreleased material, calls attention to the importance of Florida’s African American traditional music, and once again makes the recordings from the original LP available to the public.To learn more or purchase the book/CD set, you can head to www.dust-digital.com/florida. Also, head to  www.dust-digital.com to see video footage of Moses Williams constructing a one-string instrument and hear two tracks from the upcoming release. Check back for updates, and to learn more.Follow the Florida Folklife Program on Facebook for updates: www.facebook.com/FloridaFolklifeProgram.
by L. Cashman
Monday, November 12, 2012
International Videoconference on "Everyday Creativity" 0 R. Vanscoyoc Eric Chenai, Director of the World Storytelling Institute in Chennai, India, recently co-faciltated a videoconference between students at the Indian Institute of Technology - Madras and  students at the American University in Cairo. The topic was "Everyday Creativity: Indian and Egyptian Ways of Doing Things." Students discussed personal experiences, language, epics, social structures, etc. A recording of the videoconference is at http://youtu.be/V2hLzX-Rs5A . The 2-page handout for the event is at http://www.storytellingandvideoconferencing.com/737.pdf. Any feedback about this event would be most appreciated.www.storytellingandvideoconferencing.comwww.storytellinginstitute.orgChennai Storytelling Festival 2013 -- "Let's Talk!": 1-3 February. www.storytellinginstitute.org/200.html
by R. Vanscoyoc
Friday, November 09, 2012


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American Folklore Society
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