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Hand Crafted Art Traditions, online gallery/shop 0 L. Cashman From https://handcraftedarttraditions.com/:Handcrafted Art Traditions is an online gallery of folk and traditional arts and crafts. We specialize in works created by artists living in the American West. Currently, the states of Colorado, Oregon, Washington, and Utah are represented. We will continue to add artists from these and other western states.Georgia Wier, a folklorist, founded Handcrafted Art Traditions after years of representing folk and traditional artists as an employee for arts agencies and museums. While Georgia was working in rural Colorado, artists asked her "Can’t you help us sell our art?” These questions led Georgia to begin thinking about the need for a new sales outlet for traditional artists living in the western states. Handcrafted Art Traditions is the result, introducing exceptional folk and traditional artists and their work to those of you seeking art that is closely tied to the land or cultural traditions in the West.
by L. Cashman
Friday, November 30, 2012
2012 Tribal Canoe Journey in NEA Arts Magazine 0 L. Cashman The National Endowment for the Arts has highlighted the Evergreen StateCollege Longhouse and Squaxin Island Tribe's successful hosting of the2012 Tribal Canoe Journey in a recent magazine article:http://www.arts.gov/about/NEARTS/2012_v3/webf/tribal/index.html
by L. Cashman
Friday, November 30, 2012
Journal of Ethnology and Folkloristics 5:2 content online 0 L. Cashman The Journal of Ethnology and Folkloristics has recently published online its latest issue at http://www.jef.ee/index.php/journal. Review the Table of Contents below and visit journal's website to download articles.Journal of Ethnology and FolkloristicsVol. 5, No. 2 (2011)Table of Contentshttp://www.jef.ee/index.php/journal/issue/view/8Articles----------Wrestling on the Table: The Contemporary Wedding Meal in Latvia (pp. 3-18) Astra SpalvēnaMy Home Is My Stage: Restaurant Experiences in Two Estonian Lifestyle Enterprises (pp. 19-47) Ester Võsu, Anu KannikeReflections on the Metacultural Nature of Intangible Cultural Heritage (pp. 49-64) Markus TauschekIdentity Struggles of Museum Professionals: Autonomous Expertise and Audience Participation in Exhibition Production (pp. 65-80) Taavi TatsiThe Socio-Cultural Effects of Banning Traditional Midwives from Attending Homebirth in Romania (pp. 81-90) Adina HulubasThe Role of the Repeat in the Bear Feast in Traditional Khanty Culture (pp. 91-99) Anna A. Grinevich (Zorkoltseva)Notes and Reviews------------------------Taking Sides: Ethics, Politics and Fieldwork in Anthropology & All Tomorrow's Cultures: Anthropological Engagements with the Future (pp. 100-101) Aimar VentselArctic  Discourses (pp. 102-103) Aimar Ventsel
by L. Cashman
Friday, November 30, 2012
Epic: Form, Content, and History, by Frederick Turner 0 R. Vanscoyoc Just Published! Is epic as an art formdead? ISBN: 978-1-4128-4944-9 (cloth)384 pp. $39.95 eISBN: 978-1-4128-4895-4 It's said that every great story has already been written. According to Frederick Turner, this is true. Every story is simply a new interpretation of the original story: the epic. The common themes in epic literature--the miraculous birth of the hero, the creation myth, the founding of the city, the quest journey--are universal and appear in all stories, no matter the geographical, historical, or cultural differences. This is because epic is the first story and the only story central to human existence: it is the story of human evolution. In this way, epic is the origin of all other literature. Though modernists and proponents of the novel form have argued for more than sixty years that the epic is dead, considering it no more than a primitive storytelling method that humans have since evolved beyond, Turner sees epic as in fact the most fundamental and important of all the literary forms, one that deserves serious critical attention. Epic themes and motifs thrive in the cultural genres of Marvel Comics, gothic, anime, manga, multi-user role-playing games, and superhero movies. Considering the popular reemergence of epic characters and plotlines, as evidenced in The Wizard of Oz, Star Wars, The Lord of the Rings, Lost, The Matrix, Superman, Harry Potter, and the Narnia tales, there is no doubt that epic remains undeniably alive and well. Read More Obtain Review Copy (media only) Click Here To Order Contact TA for Rights and Permissions Information About the Author Frederick Turner is Founders Professor, School of Arts and Humanities at the University of Texas at Dallas. A poet, translator, philosopher, cultural critic, and former editor of the Kenyon Review, he has authored more than two dozen books, including Beauty, The Culture of Hope, Genesis, Hadean Eclogues, Shakespeare's Twenty-First Century Economics, and Natural Religion. Professor Turner may be reached for interviews by phone (214) 213-8581 or e-mail frederick.turner@gmail.com.Praise for Epic "Turner's overwhelming advantage in writing about epics is that he is one of our great contemporary poets in that genre. It is as though we equipped Tasso or Vergil with a polymath education in the physical, evolutionary, and social sciences and asked them to use this knowledge to tell us what they were doing. Turner understands that they would come to the same conclusion he does: there are not many epics, there is one epic and that is the story of human evolutionary history from the creation of mankind to the creation of the city, and everything on the way (visit to the dead) and after (destruction and recreation). This story of epic is an epic journey in itself: a tribal encyclopedia for latter-day tribesmen. Brilliantly and expertly told it is not to be missed at any cost." --Robin Fox, professor of social theory, Rutgers University, and author of The Tribal Imagination: Civilization and the Savage Mind "There is something almost majestic about Frederick Turner's Epic, the best study ever composed about this foundational literary genre.The range is formidable: from ancient and classical works to twentieth-century literary achievements, from Europe and the Mediterranean to Africa, East Asia, and South America. This is, unquestionably, the main, the true, and the genuine way in which globalism can and ought to be understood: through the commonalities of ideal aspirations, and the memories and images of all members of the human family. Turner, once again, proves himself a reliable guide in the philosophical grasp of human culture." --Virgil Nemoianu, W. J. Byron Distinguished Professor of Literature and professor of philosophy, The Catholic University of America Review Copies and Ordering Information Obtain a Review Copy (Media Only): Editors interested in reviewing this book can forward the request along with company information to marketing@transactionpub.com or fax us on your company letterhead at (732) 445-2782 and include: Book Title Review Editor and Publication/MediaAddress Business Contact Number E-mail Address Ordering Information: To order a copy of Epic, contact Transaction Publishers at 888-999-6778 or order online at http://www.transactionpub.com.
by R. Vanscoyoc
Friday, November 16, 2012
Blair Pathways: A Musical Exploration of America's Largest Labor Uprising 0 L. Cashman From publore:Here is a review of an important new piece of folklife research, the Blair Pathways CD, newly uncovered music sung and played around the time of the West Virginia Mine Wars (1900-1921), performed by contemporary artists. See http://www.blairpathways.com/. If you like "I Owe My Soul to the Company Store," you may be interested in The Company Store, written with wit and relish in 1895, and recorded on the new Blair Pathways CD.http://socialistworker.org/2012/11/13/songs-for-the-mountain
by L. Cashman
Wednesday, November 14, 2012
"Endowing Power": Notes on the 2012 AFS Annual Meeting 0 R. Vanscoyoc Rachael Hudak, Associate Editor of the Journal of Ordinary Thought, has written a thoughtful recap of AFS's 2012 annual meeting in New Orleans. You can find it at http://www.jot.org/blog/2012/11/06/endowing-power-2/.
by R. Vanscoyoc
Monday, November 12, 2012
"Day of the Dead--Experience the Tradition" App Available 0 R. Vanscoyoc Check it out here: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/day-dead-experience-tradition/id497953588?mt=8 
by R. Vanscoyoc
Monday, November 12, 2012
Drop on Down in Florida: Field Recordings of Af. Am. Traditional Music 0 L. Cashman The Florida Folklife Progam is pleased to announce the upcoming release of Drop on Down in Florida: Field Recordings of African American Traditional Music, 1977 – 1980 on November 6th. The Folklife Program has produced the book/CD set as part of an exciting collaboration with the State Archives of Florida and Dust-to-Digital, an award-winning record label based in Atlanta known for specially packaged releases of American vernacular music. It is an expanded reissue of a double-LP released by the Florida Folklife Program in 1981 titled Drop on Down in Florida: Recent Field Recordings of Afro-American Traditional Music.The original two-record LP was based on four years of fieldwork conducted by the Florida Folklife Program on African American traditional music throughout the state. It highlighted different forms of African American musical expression, especially the blues and sacred music traditions, for a statewide public audience. Drawing upon extensive fieldwork materials now housed in the State Archives of Florida, the reissue consists of 2 CDs featuring all 27 tracks from the original LP, plus approximately 80 previously unreleased minutes of music. Notable among these tracks are additional selections and personal narratives from one-string musician Moses Williams, four-shape-note Sacred Harp singing from African American communities in the Florida Panhandle, and recordings from multiple artists in the blues and gospel-blues traditions.In addition, the reissue includes a 224-page hardbound book with the double-LP’s original, revised, and expanded essays and liner notes, along with new essays, annotations, and 60 black-and-white images from the State Archives of Florida, most of which are being published for the first time. The images present the folk artists and communities that perpetuated the musical traditions documented through Florida Folklife Program fieldwork. Also featured in the set are new track notes from respected music scholars David Evans and Doris J. Dyen; reflective essays from past and present folklorists with the Florida Folklife Program, including Peggy A. Bulger, Dwight DeVane, and current State Folklorist Blaine Waide; and an extensive essay on African American one-string instrument traditions by David Evans. The 2012 edition highlights the significance of the previously unreleased material, calls attention to the importance of Florida’s African American traditional music, and once again makes the recordings from the original LP available to the public.To learn more or purchase the book/CD set, you can head to www.dust-digital.com/florida. Also, head to  www.dust-digital.com to see video footage of Moses Williams constructing a one-string instrument and hear two tracks from the upcoming release. Check back for updates, and to learn more.Follow the Florida Folklife Program on Facebook for updates: www.facebook.com/FloridaFolklifeProgram.
by L. Cashman
Monday, November 12, 2012
International Videoconference on "Everyday Creativity" 0 R. Vanscoyoc Eric Chenai, Director of the World Storytelling Institute in Chennai, India, recently co-faciltated a videoconference between students at the Indian Institute of Technology - Madras and  students at the American University in Cairo. The topic was "Everyday Creativity: Indian and Egyptian Ways of Doing Things." Students discussed personal experiences, language, epics, social structures, etc. A recording of the videoconference is at http://youtu.be/V2hLzX-Rs5A . The 2-page handout for the event is at http://www.storytellingandvideoconferencing.com/737.pdf. Any feedback about this event would be most appreciated.www.storytellingandvideoconferencing.comwww.storytellinginstitute.orgChennai Storytelling Festival 2013 -- "Let's Talk!": 1-3 February. www.storytellinginstitute.org/200.html
by R. Vanscoyoc
Friday, November 09, 2012
Honduras Human Rights Delegation Report at OSU 0 R. Vanscoyoc Honduras Human Rights Delegation Report: Observations from the National Primary Elections of Nov. 18, 2012 November 26 (Monday), 3:30-4:30 Ohio State University Comparative Studies conference room, Hagerty Hall 451 On June 28, 2009 Manuel Zelaya, president of Honduras, was kidnapped at gunpoint from his home and flown to Costa Rica by members of the Honduran Army. Many believed that the coup was triggered by the President’s recently initiated left-leaning reforms. These reforms included, raising the minimum wage, favoring campesinos in land disputes, decreasing military influence through administrative reorganizations and joining ALBA, the Bolivarian Alliance. Initially, the international community unanimously denounced the coup. However, within days the US reneged on this position, claiming nonintervention as its goal. Immediately after the coup the Honduran military declared a state of emergency that many would argue exists to this day. Twenty opposition journalists, seventy LGBTQ activists and sixty campesino activists have been murdered. On November 18, 2012 Honduras will hold primary elections. In the run-up to the elections human rights abuses have increased exponentially. In September twenty additional activists and opposition candidates were murdered, including 2 human rights lawyers. Other abuses include threats of violence, beatings, forced displacements and rapes. The current scenario in Honduras represents a grim setting for democracy. Allison Fish and Katey Borland will join thirty other volunteers and North American representatives of civil society on a delegation aimed at witnessing the primary elections and accompanying voters and opposition candidates. This talk will report the initial findings of the delegation. In addition to volunteering, we are interested in understanding the role of such groups in advancing the international human rights agenda. Who volunteers? How do they foster and maintain meaningful connections with members of Honduran civil society and/or with each other? How do their experiences on the ground in Honduras feed their broader understandings of solidarity?
by R. Vanscoyoc
Friday, November 09, 2012
Manuscript Cookbooks Now Online from the University of Iowa 0 R. Vanscoyoc UI Libraries launches new crowdsourcing site with manuscript cookbooks and more Calves head hash, dandelion wine, election cake, and West Indies-dressed turtle are just a few of the recipes from the University of Iowa Libraries’ new Szathmary Culinary Manuscripts and Cookbooks digital collection:http://digital.lib.uiowa.edu/cookbooks. Containing thousands of pages and spanning the 1600s through the 1960s, the handwritten cookbooks document culinary history in America and Europe, and how tastes have changed over the years. The do-it-yourself spirit of the housewives, cooks, winemakers, and Girl Scouts who wrote out and compiled the recipes makes the Szathmary collection an appropriate choice to help launch DIY History –http://diyhistory.lib.uiowa.edu– the Libraries’ new initiative that lets users contribute to the historical record by transcribing and tagging primary source documents online. DIY History is an expansion of the Libraries’ earlier experiment with crowdsourcing, or outsourcing large tasks to the public via the Web: the Civil War Diaries and Letters Transcription Project. Operating for just over a year, the site was a resounding success, with thousands of volunteers all over the world transcribing more than 16,000 handwritten pages. With the original Civil War materials nearly completed, the Libraries created a new crowdsourcing site with additional handwritten content needing transcription: cookbooks, correspondence and diaries belonging to legendary Iowa football star Nile Kinnick, a 40 year-run of diaries from the Iowa Women’s Archives, and newly acquired Civil War documents from donors drawn by the crowdsourcing initiative. DIY History also features tagging and commenting functionality through Flickr for thousands of historic photographs and yearbook pages. The goal of the site is both to enhance digitized artifacts with added text to make them easier to find and use, and to engage the public to interact with historic materials in new ways. "We’re opening up these collections to anyone who is interested in them,” says Greg Prickman, Head of Special Collections. "We are asking people to take an active part in improving the usefulness of the material we offer, and to participate in the process of describing what we hold.” The Szathmary digital collection is part of the Iowa Digital Library –http://digital.lib.uiowa.edu– which features more than a million digital objects created from the holdings of the UI Libraries and its campus partners; included are illuminated manuscripts, historical maps, fine art, political cartoons, scholarly works, audio and video recordings, and more. DIY History is the latest public engagement initiative from the UI Libraries, a staunch supporter of new forms of scholarly publishing, digital humanities, data curation, and open/linked data.
by R. Vanscoyoc
Wednesday, October 17, 2012
Bill Ivey to appear on PBS NewsHour 0 L. Cashman Former AFS President Bill Ivey's new book, Handmaking America: A Back-to-Basics Pathway to a Revitalized American Democracy, was published by Counterpoint Press on September 12th. Jeffrey Brown of the PBS NewsHour will interview Bill about the book next week, and the interview will appear on the NewsHour on Friday evening, October 5.
by L. Cashman
Monday, October 01, 2012
Festival of World Sacred Music 2012 0 L. Cashman Evangeline Kim announces:Text: http://worldmusic.nationalgeographic.com/view/page.basic/article/content.article/fes_2012_evangeline1/en_US;jsessionid=23AC1E3B0B4BD6A2DBC1A998563A4E4FInterview with Dr. Michael Barry: http://admin.worldmusic.nationalgeographic.com/view/page.basic/article/content.article/michael_barry_interview_fes/en_USGallery: http://worldmusic.nationalgeographic.com/view/page.basic/gallery/content.gallery/fes_culture/en_USMy music coverage of the festival will eventually appear with an interview with Dr. Leili Anvar.
by L. Cashman
Monday, October 01, 2012
Cultural Analysis Volume 10: Narrative Spaces in a Multicultural City 0 R. Vanscoyoc The editors of Cultural Analysis are pleased to announce that our tenth volume has now been published to the web! This volume, produced in conjunction with SIEF, was guest edited by Maria Yelenevskaya and Larisa Fialkova. It features articles and discussion by Goran Janev, Tiiu Jaago, Ekaterina Protassova and Anu Reponen, Orna Blumen and Shay Tzafrir, Elena Nosenko-Stein, Vanda Vitti, Svetlana Amosova, Kira Kaurinkoski, and the editors. It also includes reviews by Devorah Kalekin-Fishman, Francesca Stella, and Boris Czerny. The volume can be viewed as html or pdf on our website. http://socrates.berkeley.edu/~caforum Print volumes can be ordered on-demand at: http://tinyurl.com/cctgqu8
by R. Vanscoyoc
Monday, October 01, 2012
Georgia state archives closed to public 0 L. Cashman Due to budget cuts, Georgia is closing the state archives to the public on November 1, 2012. They had already cut back to being open just two days per week. Now they will be open by appointment only. http://www2.wsav.com/news/2012/sep/13/breaking-georgia-closes-state-archives-ar-4538200/  
by L. Cashman
Monday, September 17, 2012
The Legend of Ponnivala 1 L. Cashman I am happy to share the good news that a project I have worked on for nearly 50 years has just become accessible to all via the internet. The Legend of Ponnivala is a major South Indian oral folk epic that I collected in 1965 from a singing bard. I have now overseen its animation in 26 colorful episodes using artwork inspired by genuine South Indian folk traditions. My team and I have also compressed the story into 26 full color graphic novels. As culturally informative reading books for young people The Legend of Ponnivala is a vividly entertaining adventure story. As a resource that invites insightful analysis by college students wishing to learn about India, the Ponnivala story presents many indigenous Hindu folk ideals in a crystallized, colorful and memorable form. Series 1 of the larger Ponnivala graphic novel set is available now as 13 ebooks in English on Amazon Kindle. Series 2, along with a Tamil language edition, will be available shortly. Just type "Ponnivala” in Kindle’s search box, or go directly to http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Ddigital-text&field-keywords=ponnivala (Kindle reader apps are available for a wide variety of devices and desktop platforms at no cost from http://www.amazon.com/gp/feature.html/ref=sv_kinh_1?ie=UTF8&docId=1000493771) Teachers interested in using some of my analytic essays and study guides on various Ponnivala topics are welcome to contact me. Our animated videos, including two feature-length overviews of the story, are also available for classroom use. Some key points of study include the roles of various Hindu gods and goddesses, traditional family structure and social values, the nature of political leadership, mythic tales of creation, core events in medieval Indian history, links to the Mahabharata and much more. I hope you will join me in discovering more about The Legend of Ponnivala, my passion and the focus of my work for more than four decades! Yours sincerely, Brenda Beck Adjunct Professor, Department of Anthropology, The University of Toronto
by L. Cashman
Monday, September 17, 2012
Art Works podcast: Al Head, 2012 Bess Lomax Hawes National Heritage Fellow 0 L. Cashman The latest podcast on the NEA Art Works web-site features Al Head, Director of the Alabama State Council on the Arts, and 2012 Bess Lomax Hawes National Heritage Fellowship recipient:http://www.arts.gov/podweb/podCMS/podlist.php
by L. Cashman
Monday, September 17, 2012
Oxford American video: "Bill C. Malone: Scholarly Hero of Country Music" 0 L. Cashman Bill Malone is featured in this short article and video from the Oxford American.http://www.oxfordamerican.org/articles/2012/sep/12/solost-bill-c-malone-scholarly-hero-country-music/
by L. Cashman
Monday, September 17, 2012
Arts Readiness Movement Gains Momentum 0 L. Cashman ATLANTA -- Sept. 12, 2012 – September is National Preparedness Month, and South Arts, developer of the ArtsReady online planning tool, has engaged hundreds of arts organizations toward the creation of customized readiness plans. Local arts councils, museums, media organizations, performing arts centers, dance companies, music ensembles and regional theatre companies have begun the process of creating or updating their business continuity plans for post-crisis sustainability."Of course personal and family preparedness come first, but arts leaders also need to ensure that their organizations are protected through a readiness plan,” said Gerri Combs, executive director of South Arts. "Knowing what you will do to keep your operations running is critical if a crisis of any type or size occurs.”Arts organizations around the nation have suffered from an array of unexpected crises thus far in 2012, demonstrating the variety of disasters that can occur. The Mariposa, Calif., Arts Council offices were completely destroyed by fire; a car crashed into the street-front offices of the Orchestra of the Southern Finger Lakes, N.Y.; and the Minnesota Ballet lost 90% of the company’s sets and backdrops to flood damage."Few of us in the arts profession have been trained in business continuity planning,” said Mollie Lakin-Hayes, South Arts deputy director and director of ArtsReady. "Hurricanes Katrina and Rita and their impact on the Gulf Coast’s arts communities opened our eyes and became the catalyst for developing ArtsReady. The online tool was designed by and for the arts community, and requires no prior readiness planning experience. Users are prompted to assess their organization’s vulnerabilities, create an action plan, and train staff,” added Lakin-Hayes.The ArtsReady tool, which launched in September 2011, also includes the ArtsReady Library, a collection of arts-specific examples, articles, templates and resources around readiness, response and recovery; the ArtsReady Battle Buddy Network, which connects arts organizations who can aid one another when crisis hits, and issues ArtsReady Alerts as reminders and warnings when weather or other crises may threaten a community. In its first year of operations, ArtsReady has served arts organizations in 36 states across the country and the District of Columbia, representing the performing, visual and multidisciplinary arts."Our cultural assets must be better protected from damage or loss,” said Executive Director, Combs. "Arts leaders, board members, funders and patrons should all be concerned about whether the arts organizations they care about are able to survive a crisis.”The combined creative industries revenue in South Arts’ nine-state region of $142.6 billion, through the activities of artists and organizations – both nonprofit and commercial – represents a significant part of the region’s economy. The 83,000 creative industry establishments located in the South employ 1.2 million workers.Several national arts service organizations and state arts agencies have partnered with South Arts to bring the ArtsReady tool to their constituents, including the Mississippi Arts Council, Kentucky Arts Council, Association of Performing Arts Presenters, Theatre Communications Group, and Americans for the Arts, among others.###Creative Economy statistic from Creative Economies in the South, published by South Arts, 2011.About ArtsReadyArtsReady is a web based emergency preparedness platform designed to provide arts organizations ith customized business continuity plans for post crisis sustainability. A national initiative of South Arts, the ArtsReady readiness, response and recovery tool was developed in partnership with the University of California/Berkeley and Fractured Atlas. Major ArtsReady support is provided by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, National Endowment for the Arts and the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. For more information, visit www.artsready.org.About South ArtsSouth Arts, a nonprofit regional arts organization, was founded in 1975 to build on the South’s unique heritage and enhance the public value of the arts. South Arts’ work responds to the arts environment and cultural trends with a regional perspective. South Arts offers an annual portfolio of activities designed to address the role of the arts in impacting the issues important to our region, and to link the South with the nation and the world through the arts. For more information, visit www.southarts.org.The organization works in partnership with the state arts agencies of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. It is funded by the National Endowment for the Arts, member states, foundations, businesses and individuals.
by L. Cashman
Monday, September 17, 2012
USC Lancaster Native American Studies Center Opens; follow on Facebook 0 L. Cashman On October 4th, the USC Lancaster Native American Studies Program will host a public open house to inaugurate the opening of its new center. Faculty and staff of this 15,000 square foot facility in historic downtown Lancaster invite the public to tour the new Native American Studies Center at 119 South Main Street from 5 pm to 7 pm. Guests will have the opportunity to tour the NAS Center’s gallery spaces, archives, classrooms, and archaeology, language, and folklife/oral history labs. Refreshments will be provided and performers and artists will be on hand to demonstrate Native American traditions. Through a partnership between USCL and the City of Lancaster, the Native American Studies Center was established to promote regional Native American art, culture, and history. Home to the world’s largest collection of Catawba Indian pottery, the state’s only university archive devoted to South Carolina’s Native cultures, a 200,000 piece collection of artifacts from the Ice Age to the present, the area’s only Catawba linguist, an on-going Native American folklife and oral history project, and the only Native American Studies academic program in the state, the NAS Center will offer exhibits of regional Native American Art, classes and workshops, a public archaeology lab, and other public programs. Following the Oct. 4th open house, the NAS Center will be open Tuesdays through Sundays and Mondays by appointment. Both the public open house and regular admission are free. For details, call 803-313-7172, email criswese@mailbox.sc.edu, or visit usclancaster.sc.edu/NAS. Visit us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/#!/groups/95434605754/ or http://www.facebook.com/#!/nativeamericanstudies . Stephen Criswell, Ph.D.Director of Native American StudiesAssociate Professor of English and FolkloreUSC LancasterLancaster, SC 29720(803) 313-7108
by L. Cashman
Monday, September 17, 2012


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