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"Living Music" Video Highlights 2015 Master Folk Artists 0 S. Larson The Florida Channel has recently released "Living Music: Exotic Rhythms of Life in Florida” as the latest installment in their documentary series, "Florida Crossroads." The segment focuses on the 2015 Florida Folklife Apprenticeship Program, which allows for master folk artists to share their skills and knowledge with apprentices in order to preserve their art and heritage. The program features three musicians named as Florida’s 2015 Master Folk Artists: Haitian drummer Louinès Louinis, Greek bouzouki player Leonidas Zafiris, and batá drummer Kenneth Burney. The segment can be streamed at http://thefloridachannel.org/videos/living-music-exotic-rhythms-of-life-in-florida/.
by S. Larson
Tuesday, September 29, 2015
Peggy Bulger Discusses Her Work Preserving Florida's Cultural Heritage 0 S. Larson Folklorist Peggy Bulger is featured in a Florida Today article, in which she discusses her life-long work documenting Florida's diverse cultural heritage and what inspired her. To read the article - "Florida Folklorist Seeks to Preserve History" by Ben Brotlemarkle - go to http://www.floridatoday.com/story/news/2015/09/28/florida-folklorist-seeks-preserve-history/72976738/.
by S. Larson
Tuesday, September 29, 2015
Palaeoslavica Announces the Publication of Its New Issue 0 S. Larson Volume XXIII of Palaeoslavica for 2015 consists of two issues (315 pp., 316 pp.): No. 1 of Palaeoslavica XXIII consists of four sections. The Articles section contains a study by E. Syrtsova on the mention of people of Ros (Ῥῶς) in 11th-century Mount Athos manuscripts; a study by H. Rothe on the verbs viděti/věděti (‘to see’ and ‘to know’) in 11th-century Slavonic hymnography; an article by V. Kononovich on the Great Duchy of Lithuania according to Sigismund von Herberstein's description; an article by A.G. Avdeev on the role of inscriptions in Russian heroic epic songs. An article by E.A. Samodelova relates the custom of transgender disguise in Russian folk marriage, and an article by I.A. Kachinskaia discusses terms of kinship and their use to describe the world in dialects of the Russian North. The Publications section presents I. Trifonova's study on the Narratio Aphroditiani in its third Slavonic translation as well as a list of obscene phraseological units in the discourse of the Belorussian storyteller (publ. by G.I. Lopatin). The Speculum section presents a study by O.B. Strakhov on the corpus of earliest translations by Cyril and Methodius, Apostles of the Slavs. The Miscellanea section contains notes by L.Citko, M.A. Lobanov, etc. No. 2 of Palaeoslavica XXIII also consists of four sections. The Articles section contains a study by I. Khristova-Shomova on the Draganov Menaion of the 13th century. A study by S.V. Tsyb and V.A. Chichinov suggests a new dating for a Mongolian campaign in South Rus. An article by S.K. Sevast'ianova and G.M. Zelenskaia discusses Patriarch Nikon (1605-1681) and his deliberate imitation of the life and feats of St. Metropolitan Filipp of Rus (1507-1569). The article contains 66 illustrations, some of them hitherto unpublished. An article by A.G. Avdeev analyzes Russian social value systems from the end of the 17th to the beginning of the 18th centuries on the basis of inscriptions on headstones. An article by Fr. Molina-Moreno compares Polissian (Ukraine and Belarus) rusalki(mermaids) with ancient sirens. The Publications section contains articles on folk demo­nology in Ukraine and Belarus (A.B. Strakhov) and the Russian North (T.S. Kaneva and D.I. Shomysov). The Speculum section suggests a new hypothesis on the origin of Old Russian Perfect participles ending in -le (by A.B. Strakhov). The Miscellanea sections contains notes on Russian hapax legomena by A.G. Grishchenko and A.B. Strakhov. For a detailed Table of Contents see http://www.palaeoslavica.com/id3.html.  
by S. Larson
Monday, September 28, 2015
Asian Highlands Perspectives Releases Special Issue 0 S. Larson The editors of Asian Highlands Perspectives are pleased to announce the publication of Asian Highlands Perspectives Volume 38, a special issue entitled The Witches of Tibet by Pema Kyi. It is a fictionalized account of a Tibetan girl's childhood in Mgo log (Golok) in Qinghai Province. The narrative begins with how a little girl's life was saved by a gift of a mysterious pill from a kind, local woman who locals regarded as a witch. These and other magic moments are from personal experiences that relatives and others related about their own lives, and what the author dreamed and imagined. This text illustrates how a Tibetan woman is influenced by those around her, the natural environment, and her dreams. In addition, four stories are given, two of which only women tell among themselves.    It is available as a free download at http://plateauculture.org/writing/witches-tibet and http://tinyurl.com/ovtnl63; as an at-cost Paperback (USD4.29 + shipping) at http://tinyurl.com/odc9usl; and as a Hardcover (USD12.69 + shipping) at http://tinyurl.com/pdzqmr6.
by S. Larson
Monday, September 28, 2015
Journal of Folklore and Education Launches Volume 2 0 S. Larson Editors Paddy Bowman and Lisa Rathje happily announce the launch of Volume 2 of the Journal of Folklore and Education. Download the PDF of this issue focusing on Youth in Community on the Local Learning homepage: http://locallearningnetwork.org/. A peer-reviewed multimedia publication, the Journal publishes work representing ethnographic approaches that tap the knowledge and life experience of students, their families, community members, artists, and educators in K-12, college, museum, and community education. As an open-access digital publication, it provides a forum for interdisciplinary, multimedia approaches to community-based teaching, learning, and cultural stewardship. The editors hope that this issue will illustrate not only the impact that youth engaging with community may have on learning, but also the ways in which this impact resonates in the spaces where everyone lives and works—making them more beautiful, safe, just, and youthful. For more information, please email pbbowman@gmail.com.
by S. Larson
Thursday, September 17, 2015
"A Look Back At National Folk Festival's Changes" on NPR 0 S. Larson The National Folk Festival just celebrated its 75th anniversary in Greensboro, North Carolina, from September 11th to 13th. NPR's All Things Considered takes a look at how the festival and the very meaning of "folk music" continues to change. To listen, go to http://www.npr.org/2015/09/13/440048836/on-its-75th-birthday-a-look-back-at-national-folk-festivals-changes.
by S. Larson
Wednesday, September 16, 2015
Film on the Origins of Halloween Wins Documentary Award 0 S. Larson A bilingual film about the origins of Halloween won Best Short Documentary Award at the Underground Film Festival in Cork, Ireland, last weekend. The festival screened 122 films in 15 categories with entries from 35 countries. The film, Spiorad na Samhna -- Spirit of Samhain, can be viewed at https://vimeo.com/101398600. In addition to the award, the project has learned that the film has been recommended to teachers of Religious Education in England. Ed Pawson, Chair of the National Association of Teachers of Religious Education (NATRE), has described it as "an exciting resource to widen ourunderstanding of the diversity and origins of religion, beliefs and customs today.” The film traces the origins of Ireland's biggest Halloween Carnival in Derry back to the troubled years of the 1980s. It also traces the origins of Halloween itself to the Celtic festival of Samhain. Dr. Jenny Butler, from the Folklore Department at University College Cork, narrates this. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:8.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:107%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:8.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:107%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}
by S. Larson
Thursday, September 10, 2015
The Last Living Person Who Can Weave Sea Silk 0 S. Larson Take a look at this BBC News article - "Chiara Vigo: The Last Woman Who Makes Sea Silk" by Max Paradiso - at http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-33691781.See also the accompanying interview clip at http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p02y7yt6.
by S. Larson
Thursday, September 03, 2015
Anthropologist Defends Ethnography Against Critics In HuffPost 0 S. Larson Paul Stoller, a professor of anthropology at West Chester University, blogs "In Defense of Ethnography." To read, go to http://www.huffingtonpost.com/paul-stoller/in-defense-of-ethnography_b_8028542.html.
by S. Larson
Tuesday, September 01, 2015
JEF Announces Its Latest Issue 0 S. Larson The Journal of Ethnology and Folkloristics (JEF) has recently published its latest issue, Vol. 9, No. 1. JEF invites you to review the Table of Contents and access the articles at http://www.jef.ee/index.php/journal (see also below).After more than eight years of activities the editorial team of the Journal has renewed the list of the Editorial Board. See http://www.jef.ee/index.php/journal/about/editorialTeam for details. The new board members are: Alexandra Arkhipova (Russian State University for the Humanities), Camilla Asplund Ingemark (Åbo Akademi University), Carlo A. Cubero (Tallinn University), Aivar Jürgenson (Tallinn University), Patrick Laviolette (Tallinn University), Laura Siragusa (University of Aberdeen) and Sheila Watson (University of Leicester).It is with great sorrow that JEF announces the passing of long-term Board Member, grand old man of Estonian ethnology, Ants Viires (December 23, 1918 – March 18, 2015). In addition, the JEF team suffered another serious loss this spring when they said their last farewell to a good colleague, JEF’s copy-editor Toivo Sikka (May 22, 1962 – May 23, 2015). *******Journal of Ethnology and FolkloristicsVol 9, No 1 (2015)http://www.jef.ee/index.php/journal/issue/view/16Table of ContentsArticles:The Role of Language in (Re)creating Tatar Diaspora Identity: The Case of the Estonian Tatars (pp. 3-19)Maarja KlaasKarakats: the Bricolage of Hybrid Vehicles that Skate and Swim (pp. 21-40)Patrick Laviolette, Alla SirotinaArctic Bowyery – The Use of Compression Wood in Bows in the Subarctic and Arctic Regions of Eurasia and America (pp. 41-60)Marcus LepolaContest in Nanai Shamanic Tales (pp. 61-79)Tatiana BulgakovaWhen Ghosts Can Talk: Informant Reality and Ethnographic Policy (pp. 81-97)James M Nyce, Sanna Talja, Sidney DekkerThe Ethics of Ethnographic Attraction: Reflections on the Production of the Finno-Ugric Exhibitions at the Estonian National Museum (pp. 99-121)Art Leete, Svetlana KarmExploring Engagement Repetoires in Social Media: the Museum Perspective (pp. 123-142)Linda Lotina, Krista LepikNotes and Reviews:The Social Construction of Motherhood in Bengali Folklore (pp. 143-153)Sraboni Chatterjee, Pranab ChatterjeeThe Departure of an Era in Estonian Ethnology. Commemorating Dr Ants Viires (December 23, 1918 – 18 March 18, 2015) (pp. 154-157)Aivar JürgensonIn memoriam: Toivo Sikka (May 22, 1962 – May 23, 2015) (p. 158)JEF Editorial Team
by S. Larson
Tuesday, September 01, 2015
Folkstreams Launches "The Singing Stream" Kickstarter Campaign 0 A. Intern Folkstreams.net has launched a Kickstarter campaign, to raise money for The Singing Stream series. The films focus on a North Carolina African American family over the life time of Mrs. Bertha M. Landis of Creedmoor, and tells the story of her grandchildren in the early 21th Century.The films are a collaboration between the Landis grandchildren and Folkstreams director Tom Davenport and Tom’s old friend and mentor Dan Patterson. The films were finished with funding from NEA Folk Arts, but Folkstreams is looking for money to pay for broadcast insurance and for a new 2k transfer of the old 1985 Singing Stream 16mm film.
by A. Intern
Monday, August 24, 2015
JFR Announces Special Double Issue and New Book Series 0 S. Larson The most recent issue of the Journal of Folklore Research is a special double issue entitled UNESCO on the Ground: Local Perspectives on Global Policy for Intangible Cultural Heritage (edited by Michael Dylan Foster and Lisa Gilman). Please see below for table of contents.The issue is now available through Project Muse and JSTOR: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/journal_of_folklore_research/http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2979/jfolkrese.52.issue-2-3JFR also announces its new book series published with Indiana University Press:Encounters: Explorations in Folklore and EthnomusicologyThe first two publications, book versions of the UNESCO double issue and an earlier triple issue on Dell Hymes and ethnopoetics, will be available within the next few months. http://www.iupress.indiana.edu/product_info.php?cPath=1037_3130_8852&products_id=807804http://www.iupress.indiana.edu/product_info.php?cPath=1037_3130_8852&products_id=807806Journal of Folklore Research An International Journal of Folklore and Ethnomusicology Vol. 52, No. 2-3, May/December 2015Interim Editor’s NoteJason Baird JacksonUNESCO on the GroundMichael Dylan FosterVoices on the Ground: Kutiyattam, UNESCO, and the Heritage of HumanityLeah LowthorpThe Economic Imperative of UNESCO Recognition: A South Korean Shamanic RitualKyoim YunDemonic or Cultural Treasure? Local Perspectives on Vimbuza, Intangible Cultural Heritage, and UNESCO in MalawiLisa GilmanImagined UNESCOs: Interpreting Intangible Cultural Heritage on a Japanese IslandMichael Dylan FosterMacedonia, UNESCO, and Intangible Cultural Heritage: The Challenging Fate of TeškotoCarol SilvermanShifting Actors and Power Relations: Contentious Local Responses to the Safeguarding of Intangible Cultural Heritage in Contemporary ChinaZiying YouUnderstanding UNESCO: A Complex Organization with Many Parts and Many ActorsAnthony SeegerIntangible Heritage as Diagnosis, Safeguarding as TreatmentValdimar Tr. HafsteinFrom Cultural Forms to Policy Objects: Comparison in Scholarship and PolicyDorothy Noyes
by S. Larson
Thursday, August 20, 2015
Thank You for Dying for Our Country: Commemorative Texts and Performances i 0 A. Intern Combining ethnographic, semiotic, and performative approaches, this book examines texts and accompanying acts of writing of national commemoration. The commemorative visitor book is viewed as a mobilized stage, a communication medium, where visitors' public performances are presented, and where acts of participation are authored and composed. The study contextualizes the visitor book within the material and ideological environment where it is positioned and where it functions. The semiotics of commemoration are mirrored in the visitor book, which functions as a participatory platform that becomes an extension of the commemorative spaces in the museum. The study addresses tourists' and visitors' texts, i.e. the commemorative entries in the book, which are succinct dialogical utterances. Through these public performances, individuals and groups of visitors align and affiliate with a larger imagined national community. Reading the entries allows a unique perspective on communication practices and processes, and vividly illustrates such concepts as genre, voice, addressivity, indexicality, and the very acts of writing and reading. The book's many entries tell stories of affirming, but also resisting the narrative tenets of Zionist national identity, and they illustrate the politics of gender and ethnicity in Israel society.The book presents many ethnographic observations and interviews, which were done both with the management of the site (Ammunition Hill National Memorial Site), and with the visitors themselves. The observations shed light on processes and practices involved in writing and reading, and on how visitors decide on what to write and how they collaborate on drafting their entries. The interviews with the site's management also illuminate the commemoration projects, and how museums and exhibitions are staged and managed.More information at OUP webpage: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/thank-you-for-dying-for-our-country-9780199398980?cc=il&lang=en&#
by A. Intern
Thursday, August 06, 2015
New Book: Between Imagined Communities and Communities of Practice 0 A. Intern Adell, Nicolas; Bendix, Regina F.; Bortolotto, Chiara; Tauschek, Markus (Eds.): Between Imagined Communities and Communities of Practice: Participation, Territory and the Making of Heritage. Göttingen Studies in Cultural Property, Vol. 8. Göttingen: Göttingen University Press 2015.321 Pages, Softcover, 30,00 EUR, ISBN13: 978-3-86395-205-1.Community and participation have become central concepts in the nomination processes surrounding heritage, intersecting time and again with questions of territory. In this volume, anthropologists and legal scholars from France, Germany, Italy and the USA take up questions arising from these intertwined concerns from diverse perspectives: How and by whom were these concepts interpreted and re-interpreted, and what effects did they bring forth in their implementation? What impact was wielded by these terms, and what kinds of discursive formations did they bring forth? How do actors from local to national levels interpret these new components of the heritage regime, and how do actors within heritage-granting national and international bodies work it into their cultural and political agency? What is the role of experts and expertise, and when is scholarly knowledge expertise and when is it partisan? How do bureaucratic institutions translate the imperative of participation into concrete practices? Case studies from within and without the UNESCO matrix combine with essays probing larger concerns generated by the valuation and valorization of culture.The volume can be ordered on the homepage of Göttingen University Press and is also available as a PDF under a Creative Commons licence.
by A. Intern
Wednesday, August 05, 2015
New Bulletin of the International Association for Robin Hood Studies 0 A. Intern The International Association for Robin Hood Studies (IARHS) is pleased to announce the creation of a new, peer-reviewed, open-access journal, The Bulletin of the International Association for Robin Hood Studies. The journal will be published bi-annually beginning in Spring 2016 and will be available on the IARHS’ website, Robin Hood Scholars: IARHS on the Web: http://robinhoodscholars.blogspot.com/. Scholars are invited to send original research on any aspect of the Robin Hood tradition. The editors welcome essays in the following areas: formal literary explication, manuscript and early printed book investigations, historical inquiries, new media examinations, and theory / cultural studies approaches. We are looking for concise essays, 4,000-8,000-words long. Submissions should be formatted following the most recent edition of the Chicago Manual of Style. Submissions and queries should be directed to both Valerie B. Johnson (valerie.johnson@lmc.gatech.edu) and also Alexander L. Kaufman (akaufman@aum.edu).
by A. Intern
Wednesday, August 05, 2015
New Film on Hand-clapping, Folklore and Girl Culture 0 A. Intern LET'S GET THE RHYTHM explores the history of hand-clapping games around the world. Through wars and migrations, across language barriers and oceans, young girls connect with each other through thousands of variants—ancient as they are global—the film chronicles these rhythmic and recreational practices. Guided by three eight-year-olds from diverse cultural backgrounds on inner-city playgrounds in New York City, the film gives insight into the budding social mind and of the empowering impact of the practice on the lives of women, including observations by folklorists, academics, musicians, ethnomusicologists and cognitive neuroscientists. LET'S GET THE RHYTHM is an homage to the beauty of the beat and to storytelling among young girls and is a necessary film for Anthropology and Sociology courses. Read more here.
by A. Intern
Wednesday, August 05, 2015
History and Nature, Violence and Beauty: Recording the Sounds of the South 0 A. Intern In an interview with John Hockenberry, Bill Ferris discusses his efforts to document the south and the people who live there. "One thing southerners have in common is they love to talk and they love to hear a good tale," Ferris tells John Hockenberry. "It is that narrative of voices that I have tried to follow—to listen to the story, no matter who they are." Listen to the interview here.
by A. Intern
Wednesday, July 29, 2015
Georgia Folklore Collection Made Available Online 0 A. Intern The Georgia Folklore Collection consists primarily of field recordings made by Art Rosenbaum donated to the University of Georgia Libraries Media Archives in 1987. The collection also contains associated collections of sound and video recordings from around Georgia, including those made between 1955 and 1983 by volunteers from the Georgia Folklore Society.  Some of the artists represented in the collection include the Tanner family, Reverend Howard Finster, the McIntosh County Shouters, Doodle Thrower and the Golden River Grass, Neal Pattman, Joe Rakestraw, Jake Staggers, the Eller brothers, Doc and Lucy Barnes, Nathaniel and Fleeta Mitchell, R. A. Miller, W. Guy Bruce, Precious Bryant, and many more. Through a partnership with the Walter J. Brown Media Archives and Peabody Awards Collection, the collection is now available to view online here.
by A. Intern
Wednesday, July 29, 2015
New Edition of Digest Released 0 A. Intern This latest issue, Spring 2015, Vol 4: Issue 1, brings you another range of discussions on food and culture. From a recipe memoir of "Chocolate Goo” through an exploration of a series of WWI menus from a Newfoundland newspaper, to ruminations on the food cultures of twelfth century Salerno and present-day Vermont, this issues spans time and space. The issue concludes with vintage ads, a wonderful recipe for stuffed baked fish, and two reflections on sharing personally meaningful recipes—or not—that comprise the Amuse Bouche section. Last but not least, four book reviews introduce publications exploring Kentucky, Mexican, and Caribbean foodways, as well as food activism. Read the issue online here.
by A. Intern
Tuesday, July 14, 2015
Journal of World Popular Music Publishes Another Edition 0 A. Intern Equinox is pleased to announce the publication of 2.1 of Journal of World Popular Music. For more information and to subscribe visit the journal homepage.
by A. Intern
Wednesday, July 08, 2015

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