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SEM Position Statement on Ethnographic Research and IRBs 0 L. Cashman On January 16, 2008, the Society for Ethnomusicology issued a Position Statement on Ethnographic Research and Institutional Review Boards. On February 15, 2013, the SEM Board completed a revised memorandum addressed to Institutional Review Boards. For copies of the position statement and memorandum, please see http://www.ethnomusicology.org/?PS_IRB.
by L. Cashman
Tuesday, February 26, 2013
Artisan Ancestors podcast 0 L. Cashman http://www.artisanancestors.comArtisan Ancestors: Researching Creative Lives and Handmade Things, hosted by Jon Kay35 podcasts have been posted to date on a range of topics -- material culture, oral history, research methods, technology, archiving, and interviews with people who care about them.The site also offers discussion of research tools and tips.See http://www.artisanancestors.com/category/blog/ for: Episode 35: an interview with Brent Bjorkman, the new director of the Kentucky Folklife Program.Episode 34: Roby Cogswell, the director of Folklife at the Tennessee Arts Commission, on his research of the basket making tradition in Cannon County, TN.
by L. Cashman
Tuesday, February 26, 2013
JFR (49:2): Special Issue on the Stigmatized Vernacular 0 L. Cashman A note from Dorry Noyes:The Journal of Folklore Research has just published an important special issue, The Stigmatized Vernacular (JFR 49:2, 2012) with papers from the AFS panel co-organized by Amy Shuman and Diane Goldstein, with papers by Ann Ferrell and Sheila Bock as well as by Diane and Amy with her collaborator Carol Bohmer. This conversation has already been influential and it's great to have it in print. You can find the table of contents here: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/journal_of_folklore_research/toc/jfr.49.2.html
by L. Cashman
Friday, February 08, 2013
Mellen Press releases new book on Lauri Honko 0 L. Cashman The Theory of Culture of Folklorist Lauri Honko, 1932-2002: The Ecology of Tradition, by Matti Kamppinen and Pekka Hakamies (Mellen Press, 2013).  http://www.mellenpress.com/mellenpress.cfm?bookid=8798&pc=9   "Lauri Honko (1932-2002), the Finnish professor of folkloristics and comparative religion was a prolific and multitalented researcher, whose topics of research ranged from the study of folk beliefs, folk medicine and Ingrian laments to the general theories of culture, identity and meaning. He studied Finno-Ugric mythologies, Karelian and Tanzanian folk healing, and South Indian oral traditions. In this book we aim at explicating and analyzing his methodological assumptions as well as his specific theoretical contributions in the study of religion and folklore. Our central focus is on Honko’s tradition ecology, an approach to cultural systems that exposes their dynamic and functionalistic features. We compare and contrast tradition ecology with other theories in religious studies and folkloristics, especially with those theories that stem from the evolutionary and cognitive paradigms. Furthermore, we will explicate Honko’s programmatic model of the folklore process, by means of which the dynamics of religions and folklore can be conceptually captured. We argue that Honko constructed a coherent theory of culture, where functionalism played a central role. Furthermore, we argue that in Honko’s theory, religious studies needs methodological support from folkloristics as well as from other fields of cultural studies. "
by L. Cashman
Friday, February 08, 2013
Seeing East 4th Street - The Newest Place Matters Virtual Exhibit 0 L. Cashman Seeing East 4th Street: Vernacular Architecture in New York City is an introductory guide to reading New York City’s vernacular architecture – everyday buildings constructed for ordinary people. Looking closely at vernacular architecture helps us understand more about the places where we live, and the people who have lived there.Featuring historic and contemporary maps, drawings and photographs, this exhibit uses the tools of vernacular architecture to unlock the secrets of the block of East 4th Street between Second Avenue and the Bowery, where you can still see key building types that developed as the area took shape in the 19th and 20th centuries. These everyday building types, including row houses, tenements, and public meeting halls, make up the historic fabric of the Lower East Side, and have been some of the defining elements of the neighborhood’s urban fabric for the last 150 years. They are as common a sight in the city’s working class landscape as the skyscraper is to the business district.The history of East 4th Street is the story of New York City’s development in miniature. This story is political, cultural and social, as well as architectural. It started with the city’s 1811 grid plan, and almost ended with 20th-century urban renewal plans to break the grid by tearing the block apart.Place Matters, a project of City Lore and the Municipal Art Society, seeks to promote and protect places that connect New Yorkers to the past, host ongoing cultural and community traditions, and keep our city distinctive.
by L. Cashman
Friday, February 08, 2013
Call in NYTimes for museums to relax "folk-academic division" 0 L. Cashman Roberta Smith, "Curator, Tear Down These Walls," New York Times, January 31, 2013. http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/03/arts/design/american-folk-vs-academic-art.html
by L. Cashman
Friday, February 08, 2013
Ukrainian Folklore Audio online 0 L. Cashman From Natalie Kononenko <nataliek@ualberta.ca> We have a number of sites where my field recordings are available on line.   The oldest site is http://projects.tapor.ualberta.ca/UkraineAudio/ This sound contains approximately 200 hours of recording made by me in Ukraine over the last 25 years.  The files are indexed and searchable.  You can go from the list provided to the exact point in the sound recording where a desired topic is discussed.  The recordings themselves are in Ukrainian, but the index does have English translations.  This is a research site used by me and by other scholars.    New materials added recently are interviews with Ukrainian villagers living in North East Kazakhstan.  The recordings were made in 2011.  They are in Russian and Ukrainian.  They are also indexed.  See http://ra.tapor.ualberta.ca/KazakhstanAudio/ This site contains approximately 50 hours of sound.   We have also indexed and put up my interviews with Ukrainian Canadians in Northern Saskatchewan.  These are in English and can be found at http://ra.tapor.ualberta.ca/EnglishAudio/ More of my interviews with Ukrainians in Canada will follow as they are indexed.   We also have a crowd sourcing site where members of the public can help us make Ukrainian folklore available to the general public.  This site contains songs, stories, and accounts of beliefs.  Volunteers are requested to transcribe and/or translate the materials posted.  To date a number of songs have the transcribed and translated and are posted on the site.  Many of the tales have been transcribed and await translation.  This site is at http://research.artsrn.ualberta.ca/ukrfolklore/index.html   We have photos as well.  Information on the photos will follow.  Right now we have an old site http://www.arts.ualberta.ca/uvp/  We hope to update this site soon.  But the photos that go along with all of the sound recordings are available on this site.  They are just not all that easy to find.
by L. Cashman
Friday, February 08, 2013
Photo collections of Southern grave markers 0 L. Cashman Folk Funeraria: Tombstones, Grave Decorations, and Other Funerary Art from the American South, by Sarah Bryan. Emphasis on Carolinas. http://folkfuneraria.tumblr.com/.  The GraveWalkers, by John and Retta Waggoner. Emphasis on Smith County, Tennessee; Tent graves, grave shelters, doll houses, graves by location, military and political. http://www.thegravewalkers.com/home.htmSlot-and-Tab Tombs, by Tom Kunesh. Emphasis on north Georgia. http://www.darkfiber.com/tomb/
by L. Cashman
Friday, February 08, 2013
Electronic Journal of Folklore (Dec 2012): Borders and Life Stories 0 L. Cashman In December 2012 "Folklore: Electronic Journal of Folklore" published the theme issue "Borders and Life-Stories" (guest editors: Tuulikki Kurki, Kirsi Laurén) (address http://www.folklore.ee/folklore/vol52/ ) focusing on geographic, cultural and micro-level borders which are examined through written life-stories and narratives.The articles examine published and unpublished memoirs and life-stories as well as poetry in which national borders, borderlands and crossing borders are central themes. Life-stories and memoirs are individual accounts, yet they reflect collective, culturally shared narratives and meanings of borders that are maintained in literature, media, art and politics. Therefore, the analysed texts open viewpoints to larger cultural and collective narratives about borders and make visible their multi-layered character.The articles stress two themes in the analysed texts. The first is the narrative construction of the narrator’s identity in relation to the national border, and in relation to ‘we’ and ‘other’ on the different sides of the Finnish-Russian, Estonian Russian, or the Finnish-Swedish ethnic  borders. The identity formation process in relation to the ethnic border is often emotional and traumatic. In these cases, the border appears as a dividing line or a boundary that has a permanent influence on the individual’s life.The second theme is the construction of various symbolic and metaphoric borders contained within narratives. The time, place, and space of the narration influence how the narrators make the border understandable and meaningful to themselves.In addition, the new issue of "Folklore: Electronic Journal of Folklore" provides a brief coverage of recent relevant events and offers some book reviews.<http://www.folklore.ee/folklore/vol52/>
by L. Cashman
Friday, January 18, 2013
Estonia and Poland: Creativity and Tradition in Cultural Communication 0 R. Vanscoyoc "Estonoia and Poland: Creativity and Tradition in Cultural Communication" Web Publication Volume 1:  Jokes and their relations Toimetajad: Liisi Laineste, Dorota Brzozowska ja Władysław Chłopicki Tartu: ELM Scholarly Press December 2012http://www.folklore.ee/pubte/eraamat/eestipoola/ This book deals with the creativity and tradition of cultural phenomena in the rapidly transforming post-socialist societies. Parallel research articles by Estonian and Polish authors set out to analyse media texts and other contemporary (folkloric) narratives in order to pin down the influence of political and economic changes on culture. Research material for Volume 1: Jokes and their relations includes primarily humour, but also proverbs and online aggressiveness. The results throw light on the similarities and differences in the ways cultural narratives have changed in the past decades and identity issues in the former Eastern Bloc are reflected in everyday texts, either online, on television, or in face-to-face communication. The analysis of culturally significant texts also helps to redefine the borders and influences of the local and the global in creativity and tradition.
by R. Vanscoyoc
Thursday, January 17, 2013
Laurie Sommers' Fishtown named 2012 Michigan Notable Book 0 L. Cashman Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language:JA;} LANSING - The Library of Michigan today announced the 2013 Michigan Notable Books–20 books celebrating Michigan people, places and events. Annually the Michigan Notable Books (MNB) list features 20 books published in the previous calendar year that are about Michigan or the Great Lakes region, or are written by a Michigan author. Selections include nonfiction and fiction books that appeal to a variety of audiences and cover a range of topics and issues close to the hearts of Michigan residents. Each title on the 2013 list gives readers insight into what it means to make your home in Michigan and proves some of the greatest stories are indeed found in the Great Lakes region. The Michigan Notable Books program is "Pure Michigan.” This year's Michigan Notable Books selection committee includes representatives from the Library of Michigan, the Archives of Michigan, Cooley Law School, Grand Rapids Public Library,  Lansing City Pulse, Michigan Center for the Book, Michigan Humanities Council, and Schuler Books & Music. For more information about the MNB program, call 517 373-1300, visit http://www.michigan.gov/notablebooks or email rileyr1@michigan.gov Fishtown: Leland Michigan’s Historic Fishery by Laurie Sommers (Arbutus Press) In her new book, Fishtown author Laurie Kay Sommers tells the story of this beloved place’s past and present through the remembrances of the commercial fishermen and ferry captains who have worked out of Fishtown since 1900. There are harrowing tales of rough seas, near misses and devastating loses, and the reasons why so many fishermen would choose this life all over again.
by L. Cashman
Monday, January 14, 2013
Western Journal of Black Studies (36:1): African-centered Womanism 0 L. Cashman Western Journal of Black Studies (36:1)African-centered Womanism: Recovery, Reconstruction and Renewal Guest Editors, Maulana Karenga and Dorothy Randall TsurutaSee the table of contents at http://public.wsu.edu/~wjbs/current.html Full contents are available to those with access to an EBSCO host.
by L. Cashman
Monday, January 14, 2013
National Collaborative for Women's History Sites 2012 Workshop Report 0 R. Vanscoyoc A Letter From NCWHS President Heather Huyck: January 2013 Hello and Happy New Year! I am writing to report on the history-making workshop held by the National Collaborative for Women’s History Sites and the National Park Service on December 10 and 11 at the Sewall-Belmont House & Museum in Washington, D.C. This is the first time a workshop has been held to specifically address the need for researching, interpreting and preserving women’s history at historic places within the park system. Attended by more than 50 people from all over the U.S., the workshop had representatives from the fields of archaeology, architecture, preservation and women’s history, and included park service administrators, superintendents, historians, and rangers. The workshop combined presentations from experts in relevant fields, small guided group discussions, and large group discussions in an effort to ensure that different voices were heard. Presenters included Julia Washburn and Stephanie Toothman, who spoke about current efforts within the park service; Heather Huyck, who focused on the women’s history found in tangible resources; Historians Antonia Castaneda and Mary Ryan who spoke of conceptual issues, including the tension between celebrating and commemorating the past; and Lexi Lord ,of the NHL program, noted that sites related to postwar feminism; women in medicine, science, engineering, and the military; and LBGT, Native and Asian American history are not well represented within the program. The heads of three key sister organizations--the Organization of American Historians (Alan Kraut); the Society for Architectural History (Abigail Van Slyck) and the Vernacular Architecture Forum (Susan Kern)--were also there and active participants. The group developed over two dozen goals and these were distilled to nine top recommendations. The goals can be found on our web site here. The workshop concluded with a program and reception at the U.S. Capitol where the recommendations were presented to Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar. Speaking movingly of his own mother and grandmother, Secretary Salazar reiterated the importance of telling all Americans’ stories within the Park Service, but especially women’s stories. What’s next? The workshop was a great opportunity for the NCWHS in many ways. Our partnership with the NPS was strengthened and has the potential to become even stronger as we help implement the recommendations. The NCWHS has sent a letter to Secretary Salazar asking him to move ahead on the recommendations and reaffirming our willingness to partner with him to make them happen. And, we have broadened our network of people who care about doing women’s history at places with tangible resources, attaching names and faces and hearing new perspectives. How can you and your organization be involved? Please review the recommendations and send us any feedback you may have regarding them (email: membership@ncwhs.org). Please also let us know if you’d like to be involved with their implementation in any way. Additionally, there were many other recommendations discussed and some of those will be part of our work in the coming year. Finally, please also consider joining the NCWHS either as an individual or organization. It is the best way to stay in touch on all developments regarding our work to support and promote the preservation and interpretation of women's history at historic sites. You can find membership information on our web site here. Wishing you a wonderful, women’s history filled, 2013! Heather Huyck NCWHS President
by R. Vanscoyoc
Friday, January 11, 2013
Radio Times interview of Anna Berensin: "What's happened to recess?" 0 L. Cashman Radio Times interviewed Anna Berensin about her ongoing research about the importance of children's play and recess. Radio Timeshttp://whyy.org/cms/radiotimes/2013/01/07/whats-happened-to-recess-and-why-its-good-for-kids/
by L. Cashman
Tuesday, January 08, 2013
Online Film Festival Has a Film on Folk Performers of Rajasthan, India 0 L. Cashman CULTURE UNPLUGGED is an online film festival, streaming live on the theme "Humanity Explored".See the documentary film titled "Three Generations of Jogi Umer Farukh (Directed by Sudheer Gupta, 2010)" about Muslim performers of Alwar, Rajasthan, India. The link to the film is: http://www.cultureunplugged.com/storyteller/Sudheer_Gupta
by L. Cashman
Tuesday, January 08, 2013
"The End (again)" 0 L. Cashman University of Oregon's Dan Wojcik interviewed about Mayan apocalypse in the Eugene Register Guard: http://www.registerguard.com/web/news/cityregion/29193702-57/wojcik-mayan-calendar-doomsday-apocalypse.html.csp
by L. Cashman
Tuesday, January 08, 2013
December 2012 Issue of RMN Newsletter 0 R. Vanscoyoc The latest issue of RMN Newsletter is here! We hope that the range of short, discussion-oriented articles, announcements, reports and information will offer something of interest to all of you. The issue is freely available on-line at: http://www.helsinki.fi/folkloristiikka/English/RMN/current.htm We would also like to draw attention to the Call for Papers for a special issue, "Limited Sources, Boundless Possibilities: Textual Scholarship and the Challenges of Oral and Written Texts," to appear in December 2013, with guest editors Karina Lukin (University of Helsinki) and Sakari Katajamäki (Finnish Literature Society). Our first special issue, "Approaching Methodology" (May 2012), was a great success (printed 2nd edition forthcoming). We anticipate that "Limited Sources, Boundless Possibilities" will prove still more stimulating for international multidisciplinary discussion and we look forward to your participation.
by R. Vanscoyoc
Tuesday, January 08, 2013
Alan Lomax interviewed by Charles Kuralt, 1991 0 L. Cashman http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUHBQIqOyKxZ9eQ5LIx0nxjWGjgjEk2Ha&feature=edit_ok
by L. Cashman
Monday, December 17, 2012
Folklore at Penn in The Daily Pennsylvanian 0 L. Cashman Posted on publore:http://www.thedp.com/article/2012/12/finding-a-home-for-folklore-at-penn"Finding a home for folklore at Penn," by Sara Schonfeld, in the Daily Pennsylvanian,  the University of Pennsylvania’s independent student news organization, on 12/4/2012.Then check out the ensuing discussion in December 2012, week 2, in the the publore archive at https://list.unm.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A1=ind1212b&L=publore.
by L. Cashman
Monday, December 17, 2012
Center for Food and Culture, 2013 Foodways Calendar Available 0 L. Cashman From Lucy Long:Hi everyone,I wanted to let everyone know about the non-profit (pending status) Center for Food and Culture that I started a year ago, with some help from AFS and numerous other folklorists. We're putting out a calendar for 2013 that includes photographs by a number of Publore participants, and I wanted to let everyone know about the calendar's availability. It's based on folkloristic approaches to food and foodways. The information about the calendar is below. And if anyone wants to know more about the Center, I'm always happy to talk about it. The website is: www.foodandculture.org.Thanks,Lucy LongThe Center for Food and Culture’s 2013 Foodways Calendar is now available. Containing photos of food and food activities from around the world, the calendar offers "food for thought” every month that helps us recognize the myriad ways in which food connects us all. Photographs have been contributed by Center friends, and more information on each is on our website (www.foodandculture.org). Also on the website is discussion about the themes for each month, recipes, and interactive discussion groups.Calendars cost $24.95 and can be purchased by credit card through our website or by check. While there, you can also register for free as a member of the Center.Checks should be made payable to Center for Food and Culture and mailed to:Center for Food and Culture, P.O. Box 486, Bowling Green, OH   43402.  Non-profit status is pending for the Center. We also signed up for Kickstarter to get initial funding for the calendar.Note—the website still shows the 2012 calendar. Ignore this! We know it’s year 2013 coming up and that’s the calendar you want.For more information, contact: Lucy Long, Director, Center for Food and Culture, LucyL@foodandculture.org.
by L. Cashman
Monday, December 17, 2012


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American Folklore Society
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