Print Page   |   Contact Us   |   Your Cart   |   Sign In   |   Join AFS
Cite Unseen
|<
<
3 | 4 |
5
| 6 | 7 | 8
>
>>
>|
Forum Actions

Topics   Replies Score Author Latest Post
"Academia, Not Edu" Post Exposes Threat to Open Access 0 S. Larson Kathleen Fitzpatrick, associate executive director and director of scholarly communication for the Modern Language Association, recently published a blog post expressing her concerns about Academia.edu – a popular, social networking site, which allows scholars to connect and circulate their academic works. While Fitzpatrick praises the spirit of open access facilitated by this model, she exposes Academic.edu as a non-educationally affiliated "dot-com” that is actually a "hindrance to the flourishing of other mechanisms for author-side sharing of work such as institutional repositories.” Follow the link below to read the full post: Fitzpatrick, Kathleen. "Academic, Not Edu.” Planned Obsolescence. Weblog. 26 October 2015. http://www.plannedobsolescence.net/academia-not-edu/.
by S. Larson
Thursday, October 29, 2015
Clifford Murphy on the Greatness of Local Culture 0 S. Larson While at the 2015 National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) Heritage Fellowship events, NEA Folk & Traditional Arts Director Clifford Murphy was inspired to reflect on the greatness of local culture. According to Murphy: When we go looking for culture, no matter where we're from, we can find ourselves drawn towards people and traditions 'from away.' We can forget that culture resides in our own neighborhoods, and even within each of us. If this becomes habit, we can fail to recognize when we are in the presence of greatness, simply because it doesn't look like we thought it might... To read more, take a look at the full article: "Inherently Local Greatness.” ARTmatters: National Endowment for the Arts Monthly Newsletter (October 2015). https://www.arts.gov/article/inherently-local-greatness.   For more articles like this one, you can subscribe to the NEA's main e-newsletter, ARTmatters,here.
by S. Larson
Thursday, October 29, 2015
Should We Be Carving Turnips for Halloween? 0 S. Larson In this BBC video, Historian Michael Carter discusses a little-known Halloween tradition - turnip carving: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0369vcb.
by S. Larson
Tuesday, October 27, 2015
Norway Has a New Passion: Ghost Hunting 0 S. Larson Ghost belief is thriving in Norway! Read about the country's fascination with the spirit world at http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/25/world/europe/for-many-norwegians-ghosts-fill-a-void.html?emc=edit_tnt_20151025&nlid=58536034&tntemail0=y&_r=0.
by S. Larson
Monday, October 26, 2015
Banjo Legend Bill Keith Passes Away 0 S. Larson Read about Bill Keith's impact as a banjo player in Bluegrass Today at http://bluegrasstoday.com/bill-keith-passes/.
by S. Larson
Monday, October 26, 2015
The History of Guy Fawkes Day, or Pope's Day 0 S. Larson Learn about the meaning behind Guy Fawkes Day and its Colonial American counterpart - Pope's Day: http://mobile.nytimes.com/2015/10/25/nyregion/remembering-guy-fawkes-day-or-popes-day.html?emc=edit_tnt_20151024&nlid=58536034&tntemail0=y&referer=&_r=0.
by S. Larson
Monday, October 26, 2015
Participate in the Concealed Revealed Project 0 S. Larson Dr. Ceri Houlbrook of the University of Manchester and Dr. Owen Davies of the University of Hertfordshire are researching concealed objects and the folklore of domestic apotropaic devices (e.g. concealed shoes, mummified cats, timber markings). This is part of the Leverhulme-funded "Inner Lives: Emotion, Identity, and the Supernatural, 1300-1900” Project at the University of Hertfordshire. As well as wanting to catalogue as many objects as they can across the British Isles, the researchers are hoping to speak with modern-day finders to see what becomes of these concealed objects once they're revealed, how their biographies continue, and how their folklore changes. If you have any interest in this subject or know of any concealed objects, please get in touch or take a look at the project website (https://theconcealedrevealed.wordpress.com/) or Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/concealedrevealed). 
by S. Larson
Monday, October 26, 2015
Traditional Craft Skills Aid Children with Heart Defects 0 S. Larson Check out this BBC article about Bolivian women who apply their knitting expertise to help make high-tech medical tools that can repair children's heart defects: http://www.bbc.com/news/health-32076070.
by S. Larson
Thursday, October 22, 2015
Neil Rosenberg Wins Association for Recorded Sound Collections Award 0 S. Larson The Association for Recorded Sound Collections (ARSC) has announced the 2015 winners of the ARSC Awards for Excellence in Historical Recorded Sound Research. AFS member, Neil Rosenberg and his co-authors, won the Best History Award in the category "Best Historical Research in Recorded Country, Folk, or World Music” for their book, Bluegrass Hall of Fame Inductee Biographies, 1991-2014. The book has been produced by the International Bluegrass Music Museum, and it details the histories of all of the Hall of Fame inductees. To learn more about the awards and to see a full list of the 2015 winners, go to: http://www.arsc-audio.org/awards/awards.html http://www.arsc-audio.org/awards/people.html
by S. Larson
Thursday, October 22, 2015
Moses and Frances Asch Collection Named to UNESCO’s Memory of the World 0 S. Larson The Smithsonian’s Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage recently announced that the Moses and Frances Asch Collection has been selected for UNESCO’s Memory of the World International Register! To learn more, visit http://newsdesk.si.edu/releases/moses-and-frances-asch-collection-named-unesco-s-memory-world-international-register.
by S. Larson
Thursday, October 22, 2015
Director of the Museum of International Folk Art Steps Down on a High Note 0 S. Larson Marsha Bol, director of the Museum of International Folk Art, is about to retire with a flourish. Read about her final triumph at the Museum and other highlights of her career in The Santa Fe New Mexican: http://www.santafenewmexican.com/life/features/sunday-spotlight-folk-art-museum-director-going-out-on-top/article_6943cd4c-b60c-51a6-9afe-59095e6515d5.html  
by S. Larson
Monday, October 05, 2015
"Tomorrow We Disappear" Documents Final Days of a New Delhi Artists' Colony 0 S. Larson Tomorrow We Disappear is a documentary film about the final days of Kathputli, an artists’ colony in New Delhi. The film follows Puran the Puppeteer, Rahman the Magician, and Maya the Acrobat over the course of three years as they prepare to be evicted from Kathputli, which has been sold to developers. Find out more about the film here: http://www.aljazeera.com/programmes/witness/2015/09/150930141933079.html http://www.twdfilm.com  
by S. Larson
Monday, October 05, 2015
"Living Music" Video Highlights 2015 Master Folk Artists 0 S. Larson The Florida Channel has recently released "Living Music: Exotic Rhythms of Life in Florida” as the latest installment in their documentary series, "Florida Crossroads." The segment focuses on the 2015 Florida Folklife Apprenticeship Program, which allows for master folk artists to share their skills and knowledge with apprentices in order to preserve their art and heritage. The program features three musicians named as Florida’s 2015 Master Folk Artists: Haitian drummer Louinès Louinis, Greek bouzouki player Leonidas Zafiris, and batá drummer Kenneth Burney. The segment can be streamed at http://thefloridachannel.org/videos/living-music-exotic-rhythms-of-life-in-florida/.
by S. Larson
Tuesday, September 29, 2015
Peggy Bulger Discusses Her Work Preserving Florida's Cultural Heritage 0 S. Larson Folklorist Peggy Bulger is featured in a Florida Today article, in which she discusses her life-long work documenting Florida's diverse cultural heritage and what inspired her. To read the article - "Florida Folklorist Seeks to Preserve History" by Ben Brotlemarkle - go to http://www.floridatoday.com/story/news/2015/09/28/florida-folklorist-seeks-preserve-history/72976738/.
by S. Larson
Tuesday, September 29, 2015
Palaeoslavica Announces the Publication of Its New Issue 0 S. Larson Volume XXIII of Palaeoslavica for 2015 consists of two issues (315 pp., 316 pp.): No. 1 of Palaeoslavica XXIII consists of four sections. The Articles section contains a study by E. Syrtsova on the mention of people of Ros (Ῥῶς) in 11th-century Mount Athos manuscripts; a study by H. Rothe on the verbs viděti/věděti (‘to see’ and ‘to know’) in 11th-century Slavonic hymnography; an article by V. Kononovich on the Great Duchy of Lithuania according to Sigismund von Herberstein's description; an article by A.G. Avdeev on the role of inscriptions in Russian heroic epic songs. An article by E.A. Samodelova relates the custom of transgender disguise in Russian folk marriage, and an article by I.A. Kachinskaia discusses terms of kinship and their use to describe the world in dialects of the Russian North. The Publications section presents I. Trifonova's study on the Narratio Aphroditiani in its third Slavonic translation as well as a list of obscene phraseological units in the discourse of the Belorussian storyteller (publ. by G.I. Lopatin). The Speculum section presents a study by O.B. Strakhov on the corpus of earliest translations by Cyril and Methodius, Apostles of the Slavs. The Miscellanea section contains notes by L.Citko, M.A. Lobanov, etc. No. 2 of Palaeoslavica XXIII also consists of four sections. The Articles section contains a study by I. Khristova-Shomova on the Draganov Menaion of the 13th century. A study by S.V. Tsyb and V.A. Chichinov suggests a new dating for a Mongolian campaign in South Rus. An article by S.K. Sevast'ianova and G.M. Zelenskaia discusses Patriarch Nikon (1605-1681) and his deliberate imitation of the life and feats of St. Metropolitan Filipp of Rus (1507-1569). The article contains 66 illustrations, some of them hitherto unpublished. An article by A.G. Avdeev analyzes Russian social value systems from the end of the 17th to the beginning of the 18th centuries on the basis of inscriptions on headstones. An article by Fr. Molina-Moreno compares Polissian (Ukraine and Belarus) rusalki(mermaids) with ancient sirens. The Publications section contains articles on folk demo­nology in Ukraine and Belarus (A.B. Strakhov) and the Russian North (T.S. Kaneva and D.I. Shomysov). The Speculum section suggests a new hypothesis on the origin of Old Russian Perfect participles ending in -le (by A.B. Strakhov). The Miscellanea sections contains notes on Russian hapax legomena by A.G. Grishchenko and A.B. Strakhov. For a detailed Table of Contents see http://www.palaeoslavica.com/id3.html.  
by S. Larson
Monday, September 28, 2015
Asian Highlands Perspectives Releases Special Issue 0 S. Larson The editors of Asian Highlands Perspectives are pleased to announce the publication of Asian Highlands Perspectives Volume 38, a special issue entitled The Witches of Tibet by Pema Kyi. It is a fictionalized account of a Tibetan girl's childhood in Mgo log (Golok) in Qinghai Province. The narrative begins with how a little girl's life was saved by a gift of a mysterious pill from a kind, local woman who locals regarded as a witch. These and other magic moments are from personal experiences that relatives and others related about their own lives, and what the author dreamed and imagined. This text illustrates how a Tibetan woman is influenced by those around her, the natural environment, and her dreams. In addition, four stories are given, two of which only women tell among themselves.    It is available as a free download at http://plateauculture.org/writing/witches-tibet and http://tinyurl.com/ovtnl63; as an at-cost Paperback (USD4.29 + shipping) at http://tinyurl.com/odc9usl; and as a Hardcover (USD12.69 + shipping) at http://tinyurl.com/pdzqmr6.
by S. Larson
Monday, September 28, 2015
Journal of Folklore and Education Launches Volume 2 0 S. Larson Editors Paddy Bowman and Lisa Rathje happily announce the launch of Volume 2 of the Journal of Folklore and Education. Download the PDF of this issue focusing on Youth in Community on the Local Learning homepage: http://locallearningnetwork.org/. A peer-reviewed multimedia publication, the Journal publishes work representing ethnographic approaches that tap the knowledge and life experience of students, their families, community members, artists, and educators in K-12, college, museum, and community education. As an open-access digital publication, it provides a forum for interdisciplinary, multimedia approaches to community-based teaching, learning, and cultural stewardship. The editors hope that this issue will illustrate not only the impact that youth engaging with community may have on learning, but also the ways in which this impact resonates in the spaces where everyone lives and works—making them more beautiful, safe, just, and youthful. For more information, please email pbbowman@gmail.com.
by S. Larson
Thursday, September 17, 2015
"A Look Back At National Folk Festival's Changes" on NPR 0 S. Larson The National Folk Festival just celebrated its 75th anniversary in Greensboro, North Carolina, from September 11th to 13th. NPR's All Things Considered takes a look at how the festival and the very meaning of "folk music" continues to change. To listen, go to http://www.npr.org/2015/09/13/440048836/on-its-75th-birthday-a-look-back-at-national-folk-festivals-changes.
by S. Larson
Wednesday, September 16, 2015
Film on the Origins of Halloween Wins Documentary Award 0 S. Larson A bilingual film about the origins of Halloween won Best Short Documentary Award at the Underground Film Festival in Cork, Ireland, last weekend. The festival screened 122 films in 15 categories with entries from 35 countries. The film, Spiorad na Samhna -- Spirit of Samhain, can be viewed at https://vimeo.com/101398600. In addition to the award, the project has learned that the film has been recommended to teachers of Religious Education in England. Ed Pawson, Chair of the National Association of Teachers of Religious Education (NATRE), has described it as "an exciting resource to widen ourunderstanding of the diversity and origins of religion, beliefs and customs today.” The film traces the origins of Ireland's biggest Halloween Carnival in Derry back to the troubled years of the 1980s. It also traces the origins of Halloween itself to the Celtic festival of Samhain. Dr. Jenny Butler, from the Folklore Department at University College Cork, narrates this. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:8.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:107%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:8.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:107%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}
by S. Larson
Thursday, September 10, 2015
The Last Living Person Who Can Weave Sea Silk 0 S. Larson Take a look at this BBC News article - "Chiara Vigo: The Last Woman Who Makes Sea Silk" by Max Paradiso - at http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-33691781.See also the accompanying interview clip at http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p02y7yt6.
by S. Larson
Thursday, September 03, 2015

Career Center
| Open Forums
| Online Store
| Renew
| Member Search
| Donate
| FAQ


American Folklore SocietySister Society: SIEF
Eigenmann Hall, Indiana University, 1900 East Tenth Street, Bloomington IN 47406 USA
812/856-2379; fax: 812/856-2483; www.afsnet.org


Association Management Software Powered by YourMembership.com®  ::  Legal