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"Huib Schippers Named Next Director & Curator of Smithsonian Folkways" 0 S. Larson "Musician, scholar, educator, and former record store manager Huib Schippers has been named the new Director & Curator of Smithsonian Folkways Recordings effective June 13, 2016." To learn more about Dr. Schippers, view the press release at http://www.folkways.si.edu/news-and-press/huib-schippers-named-next-director-and-curator-of-smithsonian-folkways.
by S. Larson
Sunday, June 5, 2016
New Issue of Cultural Analysis Now Available 0 S. Larson The 2015 volume of Cultural Analysis: An Interdisciplinary Forum on Folklore and Popular Culture is now available and can be viewed and downloaded for free at http://socrates.berkeley.edu/~caforum/.
by S. Larson
Sunday, June 5, 2016
"The Elderly Bearers of a Folk-Music Tradition in Rural Tennessee" 0 S. Larson In photographing old-time musicians in rural Tennessee, Rachel Boillot has become "keenly aware that in her photographs...she is telling stories about storytellers": Katie Ryder, "The Elderly Bearers of a Folk-Music Tradition in Rural Tennessee," The New Yorker (May 22, 2016), http://www.newyorker.com/culture/photo-booth/the-elderly-bearers-of-a-folk-music-tradition-in-rural-tennessee?mbid=social_facebook
by S. Larson
Sunday, June 5, 2016
"Ethics and ICH: Share Your Experience" 0 S. Larson There is a new page on "Ethics and Intangible Cultural Heritage (ICH)" available on the website of the UNESCO 2003 Convention, and UNESCO invites NGOs to share their own codes of ethics to further enrich this resource. For more information, go to: "Ethics and ICH: Share Your Experience," Intangible Cultural Heritage and Civil Society Forum (May 27, 2016),  http://www.ichngoforum.org/ethics-and-ich-share-your-experience/
by S. Larson
Sunday, June 5, 2016
"Awake in a Nightmare" 0 S. Larson "From ancient demons to alien abductions, paranormal tales reveal that 'sleep paralysis' may be as old as sleep itself." Karen Emslie, "Awake in a Nightmare," The Atlantic (May 26, 2016), http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2016/05/sleep-paralysis/484490/?utm_source=nl-atlantic-weekly-052716
by S. Larson
Friday, June 3, 2016
Submissions Invited for Inaugural Edition of Your Portable Home Almanac 0 S. Larson The inaugural edition of a publication entitled Your Portable Home Almanac is being planned for 2017. The almanac will be founded around the basic principles and skills of “living ‘portable’ [which] means living as minimally as is practical and meaningful, being connected to the people places and things that keep you alive and happy, and generally feeling at home wherever you are” (http://www.yourportablehome.com/about/).  U.S. folklore will be an important part of this almanac, and the editor is looking for contributors. Submissions should be 100-300 words (shorter pieces are more likely to be included), and should be written in the contributor's own words. Contributors receive a token payment, and retain all copyright.   More information, including specific guidelines for submission are found at the website http://www.yourportablehome.com/participate/ Please contact the editor, Heidi McDonald, at yourportablehome@gmail.com with any questions. 
by S. Larson
Wednesday, May 25, 2016
"Big in Mexico: The Migrants' Saint" 0 S. Larson Juan Soldado ("Soldier Juan”) is the "local hero turned patron saint of undocumented migrants” in Tijuana, Mexico.   Levi Vonk, "Big in Mexico: The Migrants’ Saint,” The Atlantic (June 2016), http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2016/06/big-in-mexico/480759/?utm_source=nl-atlantic-magazine-051716
by S. Larson
Wednesday, May 25, 2016
Preserving the Working Waterfront: Stories from the Nation's Coast 0 S. Larson The National Working Waterfront Network (NWWN) is hoping to engage people in the oral history and anthropology communities for greater dialogue and collaboration! Working waterfronts are an integral part of the nation’s maritime and cultural heritage and the NWWN has started a process of capturing voices and stories from the waterfront. Please spread the word about this opportunity to learn about the project. Details below and please be in touch with any questions. The National Working Waterfront Network will host a webinar on June 22 at 3:00 EST on the oral history project:   The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Preserve America- funded project captured ten oral histories from local champions on the frontlines of working waterfront preservation. During the webinar, project team members will provide an overview of the collection, while a representative from Fishtown, Michigan, will expand on her community’s experience using historic preservation and folklore as tools for working waterfront preservation.    For more information on the collection, see https://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/humandimensions/voices-from-the-fisheries/index or http://www.wateraccessus.com/oralhistory.cfm.   To join the webinar, visit the WebEx homepage at: https://www.webex.com/. From there, click on “join” and enter the following Meeting Number: 193 446 623.   To pre-register for the webinar, or if you have any questions, please send an email to Stephanie Otts at sshowalt@olemiss.edu.    You may also contact Natalie Springuel at nspringuel@coa.edu with questions. 
by S. Larson
Tuesday, May 17, 2016
"Here's Why Friday the 13th Is Considered Unlucky" 0 S. Larson The only Friday the 13th of 2016 took place last week on May 13th. The following article explores the folklore behind the unlucky day: Melissa Chan, "Here's Why Friday the 13th Is Considered Unlucky," Time (May 12, 2016), http://time.com/4325675/friday-the-13th-unlucky-why/
by S. Larson
Tuesday, May 17, 2016
“The Forgotten Racial History of Kentucky’s State Song” 0 S. Larson Though many Kentuckians think of their state song, “My Old Kentucky Home,” as an expression of nostalgia for a happy, carefree home, it was originally marketed as an anti-slavery song. “The Forgotten Racial History of Kentucky’s State Song,” NPR.org (May 6, 2016), http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2016/05/06/476890004/churchill-downer-the-forgotten-racial-history-of-kentuckys-state-song
by S. Larson
Tuesday, May 10, 2016
"The Peculiar Language of Soldiers" 0 S. Larson The following article examines the vernacular language of soldiers and what “[military] jargon says about armies, and the societies they serve.” Matti Friedman, “The Peculiar Language of Soldiers,” The Atlantic (May 4, 2016), http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2016/05/military-jargon-idf/481092/?utm_source=nl-atlantic-weekly-050616
by S. Larson
Tuesday, May 10, 2016
Folklorist Fariha Kahn Speaks on Muslim Women for WHYY Radio Times Today 0 S. Larson How do Muslim women feel about the way their religion is portrayed in the media, its place in American culture, and the ongoing presidential race? To get some answers, Radio Times producer Elizabeth Fiedler spoke with three Muslim women who live in the Philadelphia area about their lives, the surprising comments they receives about their appearance and religion, and about the term ‘forever foreigner.’ She spoke with Fariha Khan, associate director of the Asian American Studies Program at the University of Pennsylvania, Muslim American public interest lawyer and writer Sofia Ali-Khan and Kameelah Mu’min Rashad, the Muslim chaplain at the University of Pennsylvania and founder of the nonprofit Muslim Wellness Foundation. Then Marty speaks with Pakistan-based journalist Bina Shah about what the West gets wrong about Afghan women. “Exhausting experiences of frustration, surprise for Muslim women,” WHYY.org (May 9, 2016), http://whyy.org/cms/radiotimes/2016/05/09/exhausting-experiences-of-frustration-surprise-for-muslim-women/
by S. Larson
Tuesday, May 10, 2016
Lisa Gilman's New Book, My Music, My War, Now Available 0 S. Larson Lisa Gilman’s new book, My Music, My War: The Listening Habits of U.S. Troops in Iraq and Afghanistan (Wesleyan University Press), is now available. Here is a brief description from the Wesleyan University Press website: In the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, recent technological developments in music listening enabled troops to carry with them vast amounts of music and easily acquire new music, for themselves and to share with their fellow troops as well as friends and loved ones far away. This ethnographic study examines U.S. troops’ musical-listening habits during and after war, and the accompanying fear, domination, violence, isolation, pain, and loss that troops experienced. My Music, My War is a moving ethnographic account of what war was like for those most intimately involved. It shows how individuals survive in the messy webs of conflicting thoughts and emotions that are intricately part of the moment-to-moment and day-to-day phenomenon of war, and the pervasive memories in its aftermath. It gives fresh insight into musical listening as it relates to social dynamics, gender, community formation, memory, trauma, and politics.For more information, visit http://www.upne.com/0819575999.html.
by S. Larson
Tuesday, May 10, 2016
Guild Notes Features Philadelphia Folklore Project 0 S. Larson The latest issue of Guild Notes, the magazine of the National Guild for Community Arts Education, features the Philadelphia Folklore Project and its director, Selena Morales, in an article about the difficulties facing many community arts education organizations as they transition to new leadership. “Planning for Leadership Transition,” Guild Notes (Issue 1, 2016), http://www.nationalguild.org/Home.aspx
by S. Larson
Tuesday, May 3, 2016
"Keeping the Navajo Language Relevant" 0 S. Larson As the largest tribe in the country, more Navajos speak their mother tongue than any other indigenous language in the U.S. But the Navajo language is still considered endangered. Each year, fewer Navajo children speak it. Laurel Morales from Here & Now contributor KJZZ reports that there’s a new effort to not only preserve the language, but to revive it. “Keeping the Navajo Language Relevant,” Here & Now (May 2, 2016),  http://hereandnow.wbur.org/2016/05/02/navajo-language
by S. Larson
Tuesday, May 3, 2016
"New Horizons for State Folk Arts Programs" 0 S. Larson Adrienne Decker, folk arts specialist at the Utah Division of Arts & Museums, interviewed three early career folklorists working at state arts agencies to get their take on the “challenges facing state-level folk arts coordinators in 2016.” Read about their thoughts in the following blog: Adrienne Decker, “They Should’ve Asked a Folklorist: New Horizons for State Folk Arts Programs,” Artsblog (April 28, 2016), http://blog.americansforthearts.org/2016/04/28/they-should%E2%80%99ve-asked-a-folklorist-new-horizons-for-state-folk-arts-programs
by S. Larson
Tuesday, May 3, 2016
"Prince's Paisley Park Home to Become a Graceland-Style Museum" 0 S. Larson Thinking ahead to the 2017 AFS Annual Meeting to be held in Minneapolis, MN: Michael Allen, "Prince's Paisley Park Home to Become a Graceland-Style Museum, His Family Confirms," Yahoo! News (April 25, 2016), https://www.yahoo.com/news/princes-paisley-park-home-to-become-a-103204661.html  
by S. Larson
Thursday, April 28, 2016
"All in a (State) Folklorist's Day" 0 S. Larson Check out Maggie Holtzberg's latest "Keepers of Tradition" blog post, which details a few days spent getting out of her office at the Massachusetts Cultural Council and into the field: http://blog.massfolkarts.org.  
by S. Larson
Thursday, April 28, 2016
Folkstreams Seeks Reviewers for Singing Stream Film Series 0 S. Larson Folkstreams and the Landis family from Creedmoor, North Carolina have now released The Singing Stream series on DVD.  The old 1985 film A Singing Stream: A Black Family Chronicle was retransferred from 16mm film to 4K video.  The new film Reunion is an exploration of what happened to the Landis family 30 years after the first film, and looks at the legacy of Bertha and Coy Landis as it evolved near the home farm in Creedmoor, NC, and also in Akron, OH, where one of their children migrated just after WWII and started his own family. Folkstreams believes that these films are the only ones ever made to explore African American History thru the lens of one southern family. Folkstreams is looking for reviewers to recommend the film to public and academic libraries.  If you would like to help with this, Folkstreams can send a copy of the DVD and a poster.If you are interested in reviewing the film, please contact: Tom DavenportDirector, Folkstreams.net11324 Pearlstone LaneDelaplane, Va 20144540-592-3701 
by S. Larson
Thursday, April 28, 2016
"Honoring Harriet Tubman and Other Historic Women" 0 S. Larson The following program on the decision to replace Andrew Jackson with Harriet Tubman on the twenty-dollar bill features Patricia Turner, folklorist and the dean and vice provost for undergraduate education at the University of California, Los Angeles. "Honoring Harriet Tubman and Other Historic Women,” WNYC.org (April 21, 2016), http://www.wnyc.org/story/women-washington/ 
by S. Larson
Wednesday, April 27, 2016

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