Print Page   |   Contact Us   |   Your Cart   |   Sign In   |   Join AFS
Cite Unseen
|<
<
1 | 2 |
3
| 4 | 5 | 6
>
>>
>|
Forum Actions

Topics   Replies Score Author Latest Post
Special Issue of Ethnologia Europaea Just Released 0 S. Larson The editors of Ethnologia Europaea: Journal of European Ethnology are pleased to announce a new special issue on Muslim Intimacies (46.1). Editors: Marie Sandberg and Monique Scheer Special issue editor: Laura Stark Printed journal: http://www.mtp.hum.ku.dk/details.asp?eln=300377 E‐journal: http://www.mtp.hum.ku.dk/details.asp?eln=300378 In every society, individual choice and freedom are shaped at least to some degree by the needs of familial and marital institutions. Currently, negotiations between individuals and families are undergoing transformations due to late modern processes such as recent waves of mass migration, the increasing transnationalism of everyday practices, global commerce in ideas and images, and the expansion of information technology into all corners of people’s lives. Some of the greatest challenges are experienced by Muslim families; the majority of the world’s Muslims live in extreme poverty, and in Europe, anti-Muslim sentiment has found a firm foothold in public attitudes and debates. This special issue explores the dilemmas facing transnational Muslim families as well as those who feel the impact of late modern transformations in societies where they have lived for generations. Five scholarly articles address family dynamics among Muslims in Finland (Anne Häkkinen), Ethiopia (Outi Fingerroos), Italy and Sweden (Pia Karlsson Minganti), Morocco (Raquel Gil Carvalheira), and Tanzania (Laura Stark); these are complemented by the insightful commentary by Garbi Schmidt. The aim of this theme issue is to develop new ways of talking about the links between Islam, family and the individual, which move away from the ethnocentrism of Western concepts and pay greater attention to the desires and goals of those studied. This volume includes two open issue contributions: Magdalena Elchinova scrutinizes identity construction among Orthodox Bulgarians based in Istanbul, and in the context of the post-Fordist “creative city” Ove Sutter analyses the playful and performative protests of activists following the declaration of the so-called Danger Zone 2014 in Hamburg, Germany. About the journal: Ethnologia Europaea is a lively and interdisciplinary, peer-reviewed journal with a focus on European cultures and societies. It carries material of great interest not only for European ethnologists and anthropologists but also for sociologists, social historians and scholars involved in cultural studies. An impression of the areas covered by the journal is reflected in some of the thematic topics of the issues recently published: Muslim Intimacies (2016), Rage, Anger and other Don'ts (2015), Foodways Redux (2013), Imagined Families in Mobile Worlds (2012), Irregular Ethnographies (2011), Performing Nordic Spaces (2010). The journal was started in 1967 and is published biannually. Since its beginning it has acquired a central position in the international and interdisciplinary cooperation between scholars inside and outside Europe. Ethnologia Europaea is an A-ranked journal according to the European Science Foundation journal evaluation (European Reference Index for the Humanities initial list). Since 2015 it is the official print journal of the International Society for Ethnology and Folklore (SIEF). SIEF members receive printed copies of every issue and electronic access to backlist issues older than one year (plus current year). Issues older than three years (plus current year) are Open Access. Ethnologia Europaea is edited by associate professor Marie Sandberg (University of Copenhagen, Ethnology Section) and from 2016, professor Monqiue Scheer (Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen) has taken over the co-editorship from Regina F. Bendix. Editorial Board: Pertti Anttonen (Finland), Brita Brenna (Norway), Tine Damsholt (Denmark), Anne Eriksen (Norway), Valdimar Tryggvi Hafstein (Iceland), Renata Jambrešić Kirin (Croatia), Ewa Klekot (Poland), Peter Jan Margry (The Netherlands), Máiréad Nic Craith (United Kingdom), Lotten Gustafsson Reinius (Sweden), Per‐Markku Ristilammi (Sweden), Johanna Rolshoven (Austria), Klaus Schriewer (Spain), Laura Stark (Finland), Birgitta Svensson (Sweden), Jean‐Louis Tornatore (France), Bernhard Tschofen (Switzerland) and Gisela Welz (Germany). Contact: Ethnologia Europaea is published and distributed by Museum Tusculanum Press Birketinget 6 DK‐2300 Copenhagen S Mail: info@mtp.dk Tel: +45 3234 1414 For more information visit http://www.mtp.hum.ku.dk/default_e.asp?. To see the backlist of Ethnologia Europaea please follow this link: http://www.mtp.hum.ku.dk/searchresult.asp?series=j900008&elected Selected back issues are available open access at http://www.mtp.hum.ku.dk/default_e.asp?.    
by S. Larson
Tuesday, June 14, 2016
Free Online Course: “Why We Post: The Anthropology of Social Media” 0 S. Larson The free online course, “Why We Post: the Anthropology of Social Media,” starts again today. It will be taught by Daniel Miller, Elisabetta Costa, Jolynna Sinanan, Juliano Spyer, Laura Haapio-Kirk, Nell Haynes, Razvan Nicolesu, Shriram Venkatraman, Tom McDonald, and Xinyuan Wang through the online platform FutureLearn. About the course This free online course is based on the work of nine anthropologists who each spent 15 months in fieldsites in Brazil, Chile, industrial and rural China, England, India, Italy, Trinidad and Turkey. What are the consequences of social media? The course offers a new definition of social media which concentrates on the content posted, not just the capabilities of platforms. It examines the increasing importance of images in communication and the reasons why people post memes, selfies and photographs. Over five weeks you will explore the impact of social media on a wide range of topics including politics, education, gender, commerce, privacy and equality. You will come to understand how the consequences of social media vary from region to region. To register and for more information see https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/anthropology-social-media.    
by S. Larson
Tuesday, June 14, 2016
"College Magazine's Guide to the Folklore Major" 0 S. Larson  College Magazine publishes a "Guide to the Folklore Major," which includes insight into the types of classes folklore majors can expect to take, internships and career opportunities available, and a few perspectives from students and professionals in the field.  Natalie DaRe, "College Magazine's Guide to the Folklore Major," College Magazine (June 6, 2016), http://www.collegemagazine.com/cms-guide-folklore-major/
by S. Larson
Thursday, June 09, 2016
Great Smoky Mountains Digital Archive Now Online 0 S. Larson In 1916, the U.S. established the National Park Service as an agency of the Department of Interior. One hundred years later, the country continues to reap the benefits of this act.  In 1916, there were nine national parks; today there are 59.  As part of this nationwide centennial, Western Carolina University's Hunter Library is launching Great Smoky Mountains: A Park for America, a digital archive focused on the national park movement and early history of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.  Over the past four years, library staff worked with the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP) and North Carolina's Western Regional Archives (WRA) to select archival material to scan, describe, and upload onto the web for easy access.  The collection is vast with almost 10,000 pages and images accessible online.  These include photographs, historic documents, government reports, maps, surveys of land, letters, journals, booklets, artifacts, and administrative records.  The Great Smoky Mountains National Park was the 22nd national park in the nation. Congress authorized its development in June 1934, the date celebrated as the founding of the park, but the story of how the Smokies went from being a mountain region to a national park began almost a half-century prior to this date.  Surprisingly, the start of this effort was in western North Carolina.  The story begins in 1872, when the U.S. signed into law its first national park, Yellowstone; Yosemite followed in 1890. Before the end of the decade, in November 1899, a group of Ashevillians came together at the Battery Park Hotel with the idea of promoting a national park in the East.  Up until this time, many believed that national parks were a phenomenon of the West, highlighting the dramatic wilderness found there.  The Asheville group argued that western North Carolina was a place of equally dramatic scenic beauty. One of the more interesting documents that can be read online, as part of the digital archive, is a 14-page flier titled, "Legislation Secured by the Appalachian National Park Association."  The flier outlines the early efforts and successes of the Appalachian National Park Association (ANPA), which worked aggressively for six years before disbanding in 1905.  But before its demise, the association firmly established the idea of a national park in the minds of the public and, more importantly, in the minds of Congress and several state legislatures.  In 1900, ANPA submitted a petition to Congress that resulted in a $5000 allocation to fund an investigation to scout out possible sites for a national park, the first legal step to creating a park east of the Mississippi River.  In meeting with Congress, ANPA officers were told that they needed to engage states in the process and they followed up with six state legislatures.  In 1901, North Carolina passed a resolution to purchase land for a park and ceded the right to acquire title to the federal government.  By mid-1901, five other Southern states followed suit.  These legal steps-with North Carolina taking the lead-set the stage to establish a national park that became the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The digital archive makes available a collection of almost 100 maps, including several showing proposed park boundaries at various points in time and maps hand-drawn by Horace Kephart.  Over 600 photographs document the activities of the Smoky Mountains Hiking Club.  Over 300 photographs, drawings, and documents tell the story of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC).  Construction photographs show the building of the "Skyway" from Newfound Gap to Clingmans Dome and documents relating to the Cataloochee include land surveys, title searches, maps, and interviews with families associated with the community.  While the images are protected by copyright, they can be used for research, education, and personal use.  All images and documents can be found at: digitalcollections.wcu.edu. Anna Fariello, Curator and Project Director Anna Fariello, Associate Professor Hunter Library, Digital Initiatives Western Carolina University, Cullowhee NC 28723 828-227-2499 fariello@wcu.edu http://www.wcu.edu/library/DigitalCollections/  
by S. Larson
Thursday, June 09, 2016
Folklorist in the News: "The Quinceañera, a Rite of Passage in Transition" 0 S. Larson The celebration, an increasingly elaborate affair, reflects the changing landscape of Latinos in the United States: Marybel Gonzalez, "The Quinceañera, a Rite of Passage in Transition," The New York Times (June 4, 2016), http://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/05/nyregion/the-quinceanera-a-rite-of-passage-in-transition.html?smprod=nytcore-iphone&smid=nytcore-iphone-share&_r=0
by S. Larson
Sunday, June 05, 2016
"Huib Schippers Named Next Director & Curator of Smithsonian Folkways" 0 S. Larson "Musician, scholar, educator, and former record store manager Huib Schippers has been named the new Director & Curator of Smithsonian Folkways Recordings effective June 13, 2016." To learn more about Dr. Schippers, view the press release at http://www.folkways.si.edu/news-and-press/huib-schippers-named-next-director-and-curator-of-smithsonian-folkways.
by S. Larson
Sunday, June 05, 2016
New Issue of Cultural Analysis Now Available 0 S. Larson The 2015 volume of Cultural Analysis: An Interdisciplinary Forum on Folklore and Popular Culture is now available and can be viewed and downloaded for free at http://socrates.berkeley.edu/~caforum/.
by S. Larson
Sunday, June 05, 2016
"The Elderly Bearers of a Folk-Music Tradition in Rural Tennessee" 0 S. Larson In photographing old-time musicians in rural Tennessee, Rachel Boillot has become "keenly aware that in her photographs...she is telling stories about storytellers": Katie Ryder, "The Elderly Bearers of a Folk-Music Tradition in Rural Tennessee," The New Yorker (May 22, 2016), http://www.newyorker.com/culture/photo-booth/the-elderly-bearers-of-a-folk-music-tradition-in-rural-tennessee?mbid=social_facebook
by S. Larson
Sunday, June 05, 2016
"Ethics and ICH: Share Your Experience" 0 S. Larson There is a new page on "Ethics and Intangible Cultural Heritage (ICH)" available on the website of the UNESCO 2003 Convention, and UNESCO invites NGOs to share their own codes of ethics to further enrich this resource. For more information, go to: "Ethics and ICH: Share Your Experience," Intangible Cultural Heritage and Civil Society Forum (May 27, 2016),  http://www.ichngoforum.org/ethics-and-ich-share-your-experience/
by S. Larson
Sunday, June 05, 2016
"Awake in a Nightmare" 0 S. Larson "From ancient demons to alien abductions, paranormal tales reveal that 'sleep paralysis' may be as old as sleep itself." Karen Emslie, "Awake in a Nightmare," The Atlantic (May 26, 2016), http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2016/05/sleep-paralysis/484490/?utm_source=nl-atlantic-weekly-052716
by S. Larson
Friday, June 03, 2016
Submissions Invited for Inaugural Edition of Your Portable Home Almanac 0 S. Larson The inaugural edition of a publication entitled Your Portable Home Almanac is being planned for 2017. The almanac will be founded around the basic principles and skills of “living ‘portable’ [which] means living as minimally as is practical and meaningful, being connected to the people places and things that keep you alive and happy, and generally feeling at home wherever you are” (http://www.yourportablehome.com/about/).  U.S. folklore will be an important part of this almanac, and the editor is looking for contributors. Submissions should be 100-300 words (shorter pieces are more likely to be included), and should be written in the contributor's own words. Contributors receive a token payment, and retain all copyright.   More information, including specific guidelines for submission are found at the website http://www.yourportablehome.com/participate/ Please contact the editor, Heidi McDonald, at yourportablehome@gmail.com with any questions. 
by S. Larson
Wednesday, May 25, 2016
"Big in Mexico: The Migrants' Saint" 0 S. Larson Juan Soldado ("Soldier Juan”) is the "local hero turned patron saint of undocumented migrants” in Tijuana, Mexico.   Levi Vonk, "Big in Mexico: The Migrants’ Saint,” The Atlantic (June 2016), http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2016/06/big-in-mexico/480759/?utm_source=nl-atlantic-magazine-051716
by S. Larson
Wednesday, May 25, 2016
Preserving the Working Waterfront: Stories from the Nation's Coast 0 S. Larson The National Working Waterfront Network (NWWN) is hoping to engage people in the oral history and anthropology communities for greater dialogue and collaboration! Working waterfronts are an integral part of the nation’s maritime and cultural heritage and the NWWN has started a process of capturing voices and stories from the waterfront. Please spread the word about this opportunity to learn about the project. Details below and please be in touch with any questions. The National Working Waterfront Network will host a webinar on June 22 at 3:00 EST on the oral history project:   The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Preserve America- funded project captured ten oral histories from local champions on the frontlines of working waterfront preservation. During the webinar, project team members will provide an overview of the collection, while a representative from Fishtown, Michigan, will expand on her community’s experience using historic preservation and folklore as tools for working waterfront preservation.    For more information on the collection, see https://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/humandimensions/voices-from-the-fisheries/index or http://www.wateraccessus.com/oralhistory.cfm.   To join the webinar, visit the WebEx homepage at: https://www.webex.com/. From there, click on “join” and enter the following Meeting Number: 193 446 623.   To pre-register for the webinar, or if you have any questions, please send an email to Stephanie Otts at sshowalt@olemiss.edu.    You may also contact Natalie Springuel at nspringuel@coa.edu with questions. 
by S. Larson
Tuesday, May 17, 2016
"Here's Why Friday the 13th Is Considered Unlucky" 0 S. Larson The only Friday the 13th of 2016 took place last week on May 13th. The following article explores the folklore behind the unlucky day: Melissa Chan, "Here's Why Friday the 13th Is Considered Unlucky," Time (May 12, 2016), http://time.com/4325675/friday-the-13th-unlucky-why/
by S. Larson
Tuesday, May 17, 2016
“The Forgotten Racial History of Kentucky’s State Song” 0 S. Larson Though many Kentuckians think of their state song, “My Old Kentucky Home,” as an expression of nostalgia for a happy, carefree home, it was originally marketed as an anti-slavery song. “The Forgotten Racial History of Kentucky’s State Song,” NPR.org (May 6, 2016), http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2016/05/06/476890004/churchill-downer-the-forgotten-racial-history-of-kentuckys-state-song
by S. Larson
Tuesday, May 10, 2016
"The Peculiar Language of Soldiers" 0 S. Larson The following article examines the vernacular language of soldiers and what “[military] jargon says about armies, and the societies they serve.” Matti Friedman, “The Peculiar Language of Soldiers,” The Atlantic (May 4, 2016), http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2016/05/military-jargon-idf/481092/?utm_source=nl-atlantic-weekly-050616
by S. Larson
Tuesday, May 10, 2016
Folklorist Fariha Kahn Speaks on Muslim Women for WHYY Radio Times Today 0 S. Larson How do Muslim women feel about the way their religion is portrayed in the media, its place in American culture, and the ongoing presidential race? To get some answers, Radio Times producer Elizabeth Fiedler spoke with three Muslim women who live in the Philadelphia area about their lives, the surprising comments they receives about their appearance and religion, and about the term ‘forever foreigner.’ She spoke with Fariha Khan, associate director of the Asian American Studies Program at the University of Pennsylvania, Muslim American public interest lawyer and writer Sofia Ali-Khan and Kameelah Mu’min Rashad, the Muslim chaplain at the University of Pennsylvania and founder of the nonprofit Muslim Wellness Foundation. Then Marty speaks with Pakistan-based journalist Bina Shah about what the West gets wrong about Afghan women. “Exhausting experiences of frustration, surprise for Muslim women,” WHYY.org (May 9, 2016), http://whyy.org/cms/radiotimes/2016/05/09/exhausting-experiences-of-frustration-surprise-for-muslim-women/
by S. Larson
Tuesday, May 10, 2016
Lisa Gilman's New Book, My Music, My War, Now Available 0 S. Larson Lisa Gilman’s new book, My Music, My War: The Listening Habits of U.S. Troops in Iraq and Afghanistan (Wesleyan University Press), is now available. Here is a brief description from the Wesleyan University Press website: In the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, recent technological developments in music listening enabled troops to carry with them vast amounts of music and easily acquire new music, for themselves and to share with their fellow troops as well as friends and loved ones far away. This ethnographic study examines U.S. troops’ musical-listening habits during and after war, and the accompanying fear, domination, violence, isolation, pain, and loss that troops experienced. My Music, My War is a moving ethnographic account of what war was like for those most intimately involved. It shows how individuals survive in the messy webs of conflicting thoughts and emotions that are intricately part of the moment-to-moment and day-to-day phenomenon of war, and the pervasive memories in its aftermath. It gives fresh insight into musical listening as it relates to social dynamics, gender, community formation, memory, trauma, and politics.For more information, visit http://www.upne.com/0819575999.html.
by S. Larson
Tuesday, May 10, 2016
Guild Notes Features Philadelphia Folklore Project 0 S. Larson The latest issue of Guild Notes, the magazine of the National Guild for Community Arts Education, features the Philadelphia Folklore Project and its director, Selena Morales, in an article about the difficulties facing many community arts education organizations as they transition to new leadership. “Planning for Leadership Transition,” Guild Notes (Issue 1, 2016), http://www.nationalguild.org/Home.aspx
by S. Larson
Tuesday, May 03, 2016
"Keeping the Navajo Language Relevant" 0 S. Larson As the largest tribe in the country, more Navajos speak their mother tongue than any other indigenous language in the U.S. But the Navajo language is still considered endangered. Each year, fewer Navajo children speak it. Laurel Morales from Here & Now contributor KJZZ reports that there’s a new effort to not only preserve the language, but to revive it. “Keeping the Navajo Language Relevant,” Here & Now (May 2, 2016),  http://hereandnow.wbur.org/2016/05/02/navajo-language
by S. Larson
Tuesday, May 03, 2016

Career Center
| Open Forums
| Online Store
| Renew
| Member Search
| Donate
| FAQ


American Folklore SocietySister Society: SIEF
Eigenmann Hall, Indiana University, 1900 East Tenth Street, Bloomington IN 47406 USA
812/856-2379; fax: 812/856-2483; www.afsnet.org


Association Management Software Powered by YourMembership.com®  ::  Legal