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“When Did Northwesterners Stop Speaking Chinook Jargon?” 0 S. Larson The following article takes a look at the history and current usage of Chinook Jargon, or Chinuk Wawa, a now endangered language that was once widely used in the Pacific Northwest as a means of communication between white traders and the Chinook tribe. *Liz Jones, "When Did Northwesterners Stop Speaking Chinook Jargon?” KUOW.org, February 21, 2016, http://kuow.org/post/when-did-northwesterners-stop-speaking-chinook-jargon  
by S. Larson
Tuesday, February 23, 2016
Amy Shuman Receives OSU’s Alumni Award for Distinguished Teaching 0 S. Larson The Center for Folklife Studies at the Ohio State University is pleased to announce that Amy Shuman has received the 2016 Alumni Award for Distinguished Teaching. This is the university’s most prestigious teaching award, and recognizes a maximum of ten faculty members for their teaching excellence each year. Recipients are inducted into the Academy of Teaching. A committee of students, previous recipients, and alumni choose the awardees. Amy was nominated by a group of her current and former graduate students. Her innovative, intellectually challenging coursework and her infinitely supportive coaching have inspired countless folklore students over the years.
by S. Larson
Tuesday, February 23, 2016
James P. Leary’s Red Carpet Stance at the 58th Grammy Awards! 0 S. Larson James P. Leary, professor of folklore and Scandinavian studies at the University of Wisconsin and recently nominated AFS Board member, owns the red carpet at the 58th Grammy Awards: http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/news-photo/professor-james-p-leary-attends-the-58th-grammy-awards-at-news-photo/510460396 Leary’s Folksongs Of Another America: Field Recordings From The Upper Midwest, 1937-1946, produced by Dust-to-Digital and University of Wisconsin Press, was nominated for "Best Album Notes." To see a complete list of this year's Grammy award-winners and nominees, go to http://www.grammy.com/nominees.
by S. Larson
Thursday, February 18, 2016
The 2016 Florida Folk Heritage Award Winners 0 S. Larson Florida Secretary of State Ken Detzner has announced the 2016 Florida Folk Heritage Awards! This year’s winners are: Lucréce and Louinés Louinis (Broward County) as artist-advocates of Haitian culture; Paco and Celia Fonta (Miami-Dade County) as artist-advocates of Spanish culture; Ed Long (St. Johns County) as a Folklife Advocate of maritime history and culture; and Serge Toussaint (Miami-Dade County) as a folk artist and muralist. The Florida Department of State, Florida Folklife Program, presents Folk Heritage Awards annually to citizens who have made long-standing contributions to Florida’s cultural heritage by perpetuating community traditions. Nominations are accepted annually by October 1 and are reviewed by the Florida Folklife Council. Like the National Heritage Awards, the Florida Folk Heritage Awards honor the state’s most influential tradition bearers for excellence, significance, and authenticity. Additional information, including photos and bios about each award winner, is available on the Folklife Program’s Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.1073766509356110.1073741835.269125086486927&type=3 If you would like to make a nomination, details may be found here: http://dos.myflorida.com/historical/preservation/florida-folklife-program/folk-heritage-awards/
by S. Larson
Wednesday, February 17, 2016
“Executive Director Cristina Balli Ends Tenure at Texas Folklife” 0 S. Larson Austin, Texas – January 28, 2016 – Cristina Ballí, executive director of Texas Folklife, has announced that she is stepping down as of February 1.  Ballí took over the reins of the organization in 2012, and had been program and associate director since 2009. Prior to 2009, Ballí was program director and project coordinator for the South Texas region for Texas Folklife. Before her work with Texas Folklife, Ballí directed the Narciso Martinez Cultural Arts Center in San Benito where she oversaw the successful building and openings of the San Benito History, Texas Conjunto Museum Hall of Fame and Freddy Fender Museums. She was also a producer for the Rio Grande Valley public radio station KMBH/KHID where she hosted a weekly arts news segment and produced radio documentaries. Ballí is fluent in Spanish, holds a bachelor degree from Our Lady of the Lake University in San Antonio, and is a native of Brownsville. Ballí led the organization through difficult times—but Texas Folklife landed on its feet in a new location with expanded office, exhibition, and event space; revamped long dormant programs; continued and grew successful statewide programs, including the Big Squeeze Accordion Contest, Festival of Texas Fiddling, and Stories from Deep in the Heart; produced several media projects; and received major grants from prestigious national organizations such as the National Endowment for the Arts. One of the programs that prospered greatly under Ballí’s tenure is the Big Squeeze Contest. When  Ballí took that program on as associate director in 2010, there were eight contestants statewide. By 2015, the number of contestants increased to an average of 30 a year, with a total of over 200 contestants in the program’s history. Along the way, she developed and nurtured strong partnerships with other non-profits throughout the state: Conjunto Heritage Taller in San Antonio, Multicultural Education and Counseling through the Arts in Houston, McDonald Library in Corpus Christi, and La Joya and Los Fresnos Independent School Districts in the Rio Grande Valley. The contest brought statewide and national acclaim through networks of music teachers, legendary musicians, strong organizational partnerships, and a great deal of media attention—from the Valley Morning Star to the New York Times, from KUTX to NPR, from live TV broadcasts in Houston, Dallas, San Antonio, Austin, and the Valley.  "I will miss all the friends, colleagues, and contacts I have made throughout the state and, indeed, the country in this role,” Ballí said. "I will certainly miss my Superstar Texas Folklife Team—Charlie Lockwood, Eugenio Del Bosque, and all our contractors, interns, and volunteers. Please support them and the board of Texas Folklife as they carry on the mission of this organization. It has been on of the greatest challenges and joys of my career to serve as Executive Director of Texas Folklife. Muchas gracias and blessings to you all.” Texas Folklife is supported by the members and Board of Texas Folklife, the City of Austin’s Cultural Arts Division and the Office of Telecommunications and Regulatory Affairs, Texas Commission on the Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts, Houston Endowment, Stillwater Foundation, Shield Ayres Foundation, Humanities Texas, and the Miller Theatre Advisory Board. View the original press release at http://texasfolklife.org/article/executive-director-cristina-balli-ends-tenure-at-texas-folklife.
by S. Larson
Wednesday, February 17, 2016
"Violins of Hope" 0 S. Larson Israeli violinmaker Amnon Weinstein has been collecting and restoring violins that once belonged to inmates of Nazi concentration camps as part of a project he calls "Violins of Hope." The following clips highlight the project, as well as the role of the violin in Jewish culture: "Violins of Hope," CBS News, December 6, 2015, http://www.cbsnews.com/news/violins-of-hope/"Restoring hope by repairing violins of the Holocaust," PBS NewsHour, February 12, 2016, http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/restoring-hope-by-repairing-violins-of-the-holocaust/
by S. Larson
Tuesday, February 16, 2016
The Museum of International Folk Art Helps Solve Valentine's Day Challenge 0 S. Larson "Vogue Magazine and the Museum of International Folk Art Solve Your Valentine's Day Challenge:Flowers, Chocolates, Dinner Date? How About a Book?"  (SANTA FE, Feb. 11, 2016)—Stumped about what to get your Valentine that she or he hasn't already received? Sure cards are a must, flowers a safe choice, and chocolates are, well, the cherry on top, so to speak. This year, no less an authority than Vogue Magazine – the recognized arbiter of all things "style" – has compiled a comprehensive list of Valentine's Day gifts for your perusal – and one item has an especially local connection.Last year's runaway, blockbuster exhibition, The Red That Colored the World at the Folk Art Museum, was accompanied by the stunning book, A Red Like No Other: How Cochineal Colored the World, published by the internationally recognized and renowned publisher of fine art books, Skira Rizzoli. And the local connection is enhanced further with both Carmella Padilla and Barbara Anderson as editors and contributors. A Red Like No Other is available in the Museum of International Folk Art's Museum Shop.No book better captures Valentine's Day essence. A Red Like No Other reveals the captivating story of the pursuit of red, the most powerful color – a global symbol of strength, wealth, mystery, and sexuality, a color so potent it has seduced viewers and inspired artists for millennia.  Perfect, right?Vogue's complete list of suggestions, "the 25 best disappointment-proof gifts to give or to receive" – which, yes, do include chocolates and cards, is here: http://www.vogue.com/13396292/valentines-day-gift-guide-stunning-classic-present-ideas/ABOUT THE BOOK
A Red Like No Other: How Cochineal Colored the World, Edited by Carmella Padilla and Barbara Anderson
US Price: $60.00The Museum of International Folk Art Museum Shop is located in the museum at 706 Camino Lejo (Museum Hill just off Old Santa Fe Trail). 505-982-5186.  
by S. Larson
Tuesday, February 16, 2016
"The Real Black Chefs Who Taught Americans How to Cook" 0 S. Larson Toni Tipton-Martin, a food journalist and author, has published on what she refers to as the "Jemima Code." On the one hand, the well-known advertising character of Aunt Jemima may signify homeyness and comfort, while on the other hand, she is a racist caricature of a black woman. The following article gives an overview of Tipton-Martin's research on the "Jemima Code" and "the real black women, and men, who worked as cooks and chefs after the Civil War": Lisa Hix, "Out of the Shadow of Aunt Jemima: The Real Black Chefs Who Taught Americans How to Cook," Collectors Weekly, January 22, 2016, http://www.collectorsweekly.com/articles/out-of-the-shadow-of-aunt-jemima-the-real-black-chefs-who-taught-americans-to-cook/
by S. Larson
Tuesday, February 16, 2016
"A Pop-Up Museum Documents the Stories of Philadelphia's Black Women" 0 S. Larson Vashti DuBois, a Philadelphia native and artist, has turned her own home into the Colored Girls Museum -- a "pop-up culture center and art exhibition." The museum features ten different installations curated by local artists all centering on the lives of women of color. DuBois envisioned the museum as a way to honor and educate the public about black women's history.  Read more about the Colored Girls Museum: Heather Hansman, "A Pop-Up Museum Documents the Stories of Philadelphi's Black Women," Smithsonian.com, February 9, 2016, http://www.smithsonianmag.com/innovation/pop-up-museum-documents-stories-philadelphias-black-women-180957996/?utm_source=smithsoniandaily&no-ist
by S. Larson
Tuesday, February 16, 2016
"Mardi Gras Chase in the Bayou" 0 S. Larson In a ritual that is hanging on in just a few isolated pockets of Louisiana, children are chased down, good-naturedly, for a lesson in religion. To learn more, take a look at the following article, in which Folklorist Barry Ancelet is consulted: Campbell Robertson, "Mardi Gras Chase in the Bayou Ends With Gentle Lashings, and Prayers,” The New York Times, February 10, 2016, http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/11/us/in-this-mardi-gras-celebration-its-all-about-prayer.html?smprod=nytcore-iphone&smid=nytcore-iphone-share&_r=0
by S. Larson
Thursday, February 11, 2016
"Hundreds of New Terms Added to the Ethnographic Thesaurus" 0 S. Larson This January, the Library of Congress launched a new version of the American Folklore Society Ethnographic Thesaurus on its linked data site. To find out more about the latest version, see: Nicole Saylor, "Hundreds of new terms added to the Ethnographic Thesaurus," Library of Congress: Folklife Today, February 4, 2016, http://blogs.loc.gov/folklife/2016/02/hundreds-of-new-terms-added-to-the-ethnographic-thesaurus/?loclr=fbafcTo access the thesaurus: http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/ethnographicTerms.html?loclr=blogflt
by S. Larson
Thursday, February 11, 2016
Stuff You Should Know Podcast: “What is Folklore?” 0 S. Larson The Stuff You Should Know Podcast aims to "educate the public on common things and how they work” and is part of http://www.howstuffworks.com/. The hosts take a stab at explaining folklore. The podcast and transcript are available here: http://www.stuffyoushouldknow.com/?s=folklore
by S. Larson
Thursday, February 11, 2016
ACLS Interviews Lee Haring for Humanities Video Series 0 S. Larson The American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) has just started posting on its web site a series of "humanities videos," in which leading scholars in various fields (who are their societies' delegates to ACLS) talk briefly about their work and about the value of the humanities. Our own Lee Haring is among the first crop of scholars to take part in this project, and his video is available to view at http://www.acls.org/media/humanities_interviews/.  
by S. Larson
Thursday, February 11, 2016
Elder Midwife History Gathering Project 0 S. Larson The Elder Midwife History Gathering Project is devoted to collecting oral histories from senior midwives in the United States and Canada. The facilitators of this project plan to interview at least two "elder midwives” from each state in the USA and each province in Canada. Learn more at http://www.facebook.com/eldermidwifehistorygathering. If you have any questions about the project, contact:   Barbara Grace 719 354 0326    gracedland@gmail.com
by S. Larson
Thursday, February 11, 2016
Folkstreams Develops Film Timeline 0 S. Larson Folkstreams has released a timeline of all its films from 1946 to 2015. The timeline, developed by Zach Nichols, is on a horizontal axis with the films arranged by their cultural regions on a series of vertical rows. Each film links directly to its respective Folkstreams streaming page. Here is the link to the preview: https://cdn.knightlab.com/libs/timeline3/latest/embed/index.html For further information, contact:    Tom Davenport Director, Folkstreams.net 11324 Pearlstone Lane Delaplane, Va 20144 540-592-3701
by S. Larson
Thursday, February 11, 2016
Chennai Storytelling Festival 2016 Videoconference-webcast Now Available 0 S. Larson The Videoconference-webcast, "Conversation About Storytelling,” from the Chennai Storytelling Festival 2016 is now available here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IQlJedGL4TY&feature=youtu.be The Videoconference-webcast was co-hosted in Chennai by Ruth Stotter (of California) and Eric Miller (of New York City). They were joined by Alvin Rajah, Asha Sampath and Chithra Ramachandran in Chennai; and Chetna Mehrotra and Marina Granlund (of Sweden) in Mumbai. The two main themes of the festival (and this videoconference) were:Storytelling relating to the Big Rain of Nov/Dec 2015 (in Chennai and the surrounding vicinity)Storytelling for communication between cultures, between people, and within people, including topics such as travel, tourism, translation, "journey" and "path" as metaphors for life, visiting other lands and worlds, discovery and exploration of the other and of the self.
by S. Larson
Wednesday, February 10, 2016
Smithsonian Center for Folklife & Cultural Heritage Updates Interview Guide 0 S. Larson The Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage has updated one of its most popular resources to reflect current technology: The Smithsonian Folklife and Oral History Interviewing Guide by Marjorie Hunt (2003). "This booklet presents some guidelines Smithsonian folklorists have developed over the years for collecting folklife and oral history from family and community members. It features a general guide to conducting an interview, as well as a sample list of questions that may be adapted to your own needs and circumstances. The booklet concludes with a few examples of ways to preserve and present your findings, a selection of further readings, a glossary of key terms, and sample information and release forms” (The Smithsonian Folklife and Oral History Interviewing Guide).To print or download your own copy for free, go to http://www.folklife.si.edu/the-smithsonian-folklife-and-oral-history-interviewing-guide/smithsonian.  
by S. Larson
Wednesday, February 10, 2016
The Latest Issue of Children's Folklore Review Now Available 0 S. Larson The AFS Children’s Folklore Section has just launched the latest issue of the Children’s Folklore Review (Vol. 37, 2015), which is an entire issue devoted to the life and work of Brian Sutton-Smith. It includes contributions by Elizabeth Tucker, Jay Mechling, and Garry Chick.   If you wish to purchase this issue, please contact Paulina Guerrero at the American Folklore Society: plguerre@indiana.edu.   For more information about the Children’s Folklore Review, please visit http://www.afsnet.org/?page=CFR.
by S. Larson
Tuesday, February 09, 2016
Professor's Scholarship Sparks Intellectual Property Rights Debate 0 S. Larson Many members of the Acoma Pueblo tribe are dismayed by the recent scholarship of Dr. Peter Nabokov, a professor in the Department of World Arts and Cultures at UCLA. In How the World Moves and The Origin Myth of Acoma Pueblo, Nabokov discloses the details of sacred Acoma traditions without having received permission from the tribe. To learn more, follow the link below: Lucas Iberico Lozada, "The Professor and the Pueblo: Was the disclosure of Acoma traditions exploitation or scholarship?" Santa Fe Reporter, January 27, 2016, http://www.sfreporter.com/santafe/article-11510-the-professor-and-the-pueblo.html
by S. Larson
Monday, February 01, 2016
"UMaine Offers Folklore Minor to Students" 0 S. Larson Two years ago, the University of Maine began offering a folklore minor to its students thanks to Professors Pauleena MacDougall - also director of the Maine Folklife Center - and Sarah Harlan-Haughey. The following article, published in the Bangor Daily News, discusses what the minor has to offer for both the university and the state: Shelby Hartin, "UMaine offers folklore minor for students,” Bangor Daily News, January 27, 2016, http://bangordailynews.com/2016/01/27/homestead/umaine-offers-folklore-minor-for-students/ 
by S. Larson
Monday, February 01, 2016

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