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TAUNY releases Songs to Keep: Traditional Adirondack North Country Songs 0 L. Cashman Tradtional Arts in Upstate New York (www.tauny.org) has released: a CD featuring contemporary folk musicians from the Adirondack/Champlain Valley region of New York State interpreting songs collected by Marjorie Lansing Porter in the 1940's and 50's40-page book of 16 Adirondack North Country songs from the Marjorie Lansing Porter Collection of Ballads and Lore. Includes words, music, and background and history on Marjorie Lansing Porter, the music she recorded, and the 2013 project to bring those songs to light. See http://shop.tauny.org/home.html
by L. Cashman
Monday, November 18, 2013
Lee Haring's How to Read a Folktale published online, open access 0 L. Cashman From OpenBook Publishers:How to Read a Folktale: The ‘Ibonia’ Epic from Madagascar by Lee HaringHow to Read a Folktale offers an English translation of Ibonia, a spellbinding tale of old Madagascar.  Recorded when the Malagasy people were experiencing European contact for the first time, Ibonia proclaims the power of the ancestors against the foreigner.  Its fairytale elements link it with European folktales, but the story is nonetheless very much a product of Madagascar.  Inflating the form of folktale to epic proportions, it combines African-style praise poetry with Indonesian-style riddles and poems.Through Ibonia, Lee Haring expertly helps readers to understand the very nature of folktales.  His definitive translation, originally published in 1994, has now been fully revised to emphasize its poetic qualities, while his new introduction and detailed notes give insight to the fascinating imagination and symbols of the Malagasy.  Haring’s research connects this exotic narrative with fundamental questions not only of anthropology but also of literary criticism.How to Read a Folktale was published on 24th October and can be read for free online at http://www.openbookpublishers.com/product/109 where it is also available in inexpensive e-book, paperback and hardback editions.Open Book Publishers is a non-profit, Open Access publisher, run by academics in Cambridge and London.  We are committed to making high-quality research freely available to readers around the world, and we are proud to say that our online editions are currently being accessed by thousands of readers each month in over 125 countries.Please do not hesitate to contact me for more details about this book or what we do at OBP.Best wishes,CatherineCatherine HeygateEditorwww.openbookpublishers.com
by L. Cashman
Monday, November 18, 2013
2013 AFS meeting and Robert Rothstein in Yiddish Daily Forward 0 L. Cashman Itzik Gottesmanwrote a piece on the 2013 AFS meeting featuring Robert Rothstein and his work on Yiddish folksong in The Yiddish Daily Forward. It appeared in print and on line at:http://yiddish.forward.com/articles/173633/from-mathematics-to-folkloristics/
by L. Cashman
Monday, November 18, 2013
"Turning A Page Inside A Rural One-Room Library" 0 L. Cashman "Turning A Page Inside A Rural One-Room Library," by Jennifer Davidson, NPR Morning Edition, October 21, 2013 3:06 AM, on Rachel Reynolds Luster "curating" a rural library: http://www.npr.org/2013/10/21/235483140/turning-a-page-inside-a-rural-one-room-library?ft=1&f=1001&utm_content=socialflow&utm_campaign=nprnews&utm_source=npr&utm_medium=twitter
by L. Cashman
Monday, November 18, 2013
Open access Journal of Ethnology and Folkloristics releases Vol. 7, No. 1 0 L. Cashman Journal of Ethnology and Folkloristics (JEF) has released Vol. 7, No. 1 at http://www.jef.ee/index.php/journal. Visit the web site to read and download articles (open access).-----------------------------------------------Journal of Ethnology and FolkloristicsVol 7, No 1 (2013)Table of Contentshttp://www.jef.ee/index.php/journal/issue/view/12Articles---------Folk Religion in Discourse and Practice (pp. 3-18)    James Alexander KapalóTree Beings in Tibet: Contemporary Popular Concepts of Klu and Gnyan as a Result of Ecological Change (pp. 19-30)    Jakub KocurekSowing the Seeds of Faith: A Case Study of an American Missionary in the Russian North (pp. 31-48)    Piret KoosaThe Body in New Age from the Perspective of the Subtle Body: The Example of the Source Breathwork Community (pp. 49-64)    Katre KoppelImmoral Obscenity: Censorship of Folklore Manuscript Collections in Late Stalinist Estonia (pp. 65-81)    Kaisa KulasaluAnthropological Interpretation of the Meaning of Ritual Objects in the Contemporary Urban Wedding in Bulgaria (pp. 83-104)    Rozaliya GuigovaPlaces Revisited: Transnational Families and Stories of Belonging (pp. 105-124)    Pihla Maria SiimOfficial Status As a Tool of Language Revival? A Study of the Language Laws in Russia’s Finno-Ugric Republics (pp. 125-153)    Konstantin ZamyatinNotes and Reviews------------------------Gendered Rural Spaces (pp. 154-156)    Piret Koosa________________________________________________________________________Journal of Ethnology and Folkloristicshttp://www.jef.ee--
by L. Cashman
Monday, November 18, 2013
Gender, Sexuality, and Creativity in the Latina/o and African Diasporas 0 R. Vanscoyoc SUNY Press has just released Yemoja: Gender, Sexuality, and Creativity in the Latina/o and African Diasporas, edited by Solimar Otero and Toyin Falola. Visit http://www.sunypress.edu/p-5775-yemoja.aspx for more.  
by R. Vanscoyoc
Friday, November 01, 2013
New Hampshire State Council on the Arts Launches New Traditional Arts Blog 0 R. Vanscoyoc The Heritage and Traditional Arts Office at the New Hampshire State Council on the Arts has launched a new blog to highlight and celebrate Traditional Arts and Artists across the state and the communities that share them. The blog address is http://nhheritagearts.blogspot.com/. The blog will highlight traditional arts events, programs presented by the Traditional Arts Office, highlights from Apprenticeship audio interviews, and guest blog posts from cultural organizations offering heritage programming. The blog is meant to complement our http://www.nh.gov/folklife/ website which currently functions as an educational resource.  We hope you check it out!
by R. Vanscoyoc
Friday, October 11, 2013
A Dam in the River: Releasing the Flow of University Ideas, by Jeff Camhi 0 L. Cashman From  Jeff Camhi:It started for me at about the time of the new millennium. My work as a biology professor having pretty much peaked, I returned to my earlier interest in education for the general public. Long story short, I was invited to found, and then direct, a unique "open-campus museum” at my university.         With no prior training in museum work, I began reading all the relevant books and professional journals I could find, attended international conferences and workshops, befriended and learned much from museum leaders in New York, Washington, Chicago and London. I kept hearing about themed tours, narratives, story lines, imagination, emotion, art. I began to realize that good museums are good story tellers. Some actually have professional storytellers on staff.          Last month our open-campus museum celebrated its tenth anniversary. We tell the public the stories behind the forefront research, the various collections, the symbolic objects, and the people on our campus. Our guides/storytellers are mostly graduate students who have taken our masters course in guiding/storytelling.            Along with this, for the last decade we have carried out and published research on the process of public education. Our biggest project to date has been a seven year study of the more distinguished American research universities and liberal arts colleges to determine how effectively they tell their stories, not to just an elite upper crust of society, but to the general public. The results, some of them shocking, have just come out in book form; it’s a book intended for the general public as well as the storytelling/tour guiding and academic populations.            "A Dam in the River: Releasing the Flow of University Ideas” by Jeff Camhi (that’s me), published Algora Publications, New York, explores what university subjects and stories are important for the general public and why, and how to get the stories flowing on and from college campuses, at very little cost (in some cases at no cost), for everyone's benefit. "A Dam in the River” offers 35 specific suggestions for increasing the flow and the effectiveness of academia’s important stories. For instance, one chapter is about new methods we have developed for getting individual listeners to connect personally and emotionally to the stories we tell. Another analyzes my "anthropological” research trips to the University of Michigan and Amherst College in search of their stories. Others concern university stories in books, on radio and TV, and on the Internet.Here’s what academic leaders say about "A Dam in the River”Dudley Herschbach, Nobel Laureate, Chemistry, Harvard; Emeritus Board Chair, Society for Science and the Public.            In this sparkling, stimulating book, Camhi issues a clarion call for universities to share the bounty of their ideas much more broadly with the public. He offers practical ways to achieve this, at little cost, and makes a compelling case for "increasing the flow of ideas…that can change a mind, change a life, change the world.” I greatly admire "A Dam in the River.” Its message is very important and its presentation is superb. Donald Kennedy, President Emeritus, Stanford University; Past Editor-in-Chief of the journal "Science.”            I found "A Dam in the River” fascinating, particularly the use of the museum metaphor to suggest ways in which universities might open their work and their ideas to the public. Camhi has his hands on a great approach.Frank Rhodes, President Emeritus, Cornell University.            I agree with Camhi’s thesis that universities should be more accessible to the public. This book is well written in an engaging tone and comes across in a warm and friendly, conversational manner.Alice S. Huang, Cal Tech biologist; former Dean, Faculty of Science, NYU; Past President, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).            Are ideas important? Camhi’s book gives a resounding yes. He delves into all the activities that we at higher educational institutions can do better in communicating to the public, requiring little financial output. All academics concerned with teaching and effective engagement with the public will resonate with these ideas.Russell A. Berman, Professor of Humanities, Stanford University; Past President, Modern Language Association.            A thoughtful and detailed study of the contemporary American university, its wealth of ideas, and the challenges it faces in making those ideas available to the public. "A Dam in the River” challenges traditional academic culture—quite an accomplishment, covering a wide range of topics with good detail, and written in a way a wider public can understand.” Mary Walshok, Associate Vice Chancellor for Public Programs and Dean of Extension, University of California San Diego.         Jeff Camhi provides a unique and insightful perspective on the still fragmented and often marginal role civic engagement and public service play in America's leading Research Universities and distinguished Liberal Arts Colleges. His examples and insights are useful and challenging at a time when colleges and universities across the nation are addressing how to assure sustained support and respect for the academic enterprise.John Falk, Professor of Free Choice Learning, Oregon State University.         A Dam in the River, a book about conveying ideas, is itself a good idea conveyed well.  Professor Camhi not only clearly and persuasively makes the case for why it is essential to let loose the vast reservoirs of ideas trapped within today's universities but offers up a range of straight-forward, readily implementable suggestions for how to deliver those ideas to the nationAbout the Author            Jeff Camhi was born in New York City and raised in its suburbs. He received his BA and his PhD in biology, from Tufts and Harvard, respectively. He then taught at Cornell for 15 years. Following a sabbatical year at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, he accepted a job offer there and moved with his family to Israel. A full professor first at Cornell and then at the Hebrew University (now Emeritus Professor), for most of his career his research specialty has been the neural basis of animal behavior.            At about the time of the new millennium, Camhi’s long-term interest in public education was re-kindled. Becoming Founding Director of the Nature Park & Galleries, the Hebrew University’s "open-campus museum," he changed his field of research and publication to museology. This was the starting point of his research for "A Dam in the River.” For the book, he carried out extended visits to 23 American research universities and liberal arts colleges and 13 additional academic organizations. He interviewed 155 American academic leaders—university and college presidents, provosts, deans, heads of museums and outreach programs, and others. He carried out nation-wide surveys and analyzed other surveys as well as the writings of major academic, museum, and storytelling leaders. He continues his varied work connected to "A Dam in the River.” "A Dam in the River” is available at Amazon (where you can "Look Inside” the book): http://www.amazon.com/Dam-River-Releasing-University-Ideas/dp/0875869882or at Algora Publications, New York.
by L. Cashman
Monday, September 16, 2013
Unveiling of George Mason University Folklore Studies Program website 0 L. Cashman See the new website at http://folklore.gmu.edu
by L. Cashman
Monday, September 16, 2013
Sarah Bryan's Folk Funeraria in Design Observer Blog 0 L. Cashman See John Foster, "Folk Funeraria of the South," The Design Observer Group Observatory. http://observatory.designobserver.com/feature/folk-funeraria-of-the-south/38045/
by L. Cashman
Wednesday, August 21, 2013
Béascna 8: UCC Journal of Folklore and Ethnology 0 L. Cashman The latest number of Béascna (UCC Journal of Folklore and Ethnology) is now available. Please find below a list of the contents of this year's volume. BÉASCNA 8 (2013) UCC JOURNAL OF FOLKLORE AND ETHNOLOGY / IRIS BHÉALOIDEASA AGUS EITNEOLAÍOCHTA COC Clár Ábhair / Table of Contents Altanna / Articles Mícheál Briody, The Gaelic Story-Teller and Séamus Ó 
Duilearga’s Views on the Role and Antiquity of Airneán Simon Young, Some Notes on Irish Fairy Changelings in Nineteenth-Century Newspapers Dáithí de Mórdha, Fiagaithe na gCeann: An Dr. Charles R. 
Browne agus Eitneagrafaíocht Iarthar Éireann Chad Buterbaugh, Speech Play and Satire in a Folklorized 
Irish StoryRosari Kingston, A Tale of Two Bone-setters: An Examination 
of the Bone-setting Tradition in Ireland Tríona Ní Shíocháin, Filí agus Amhránaithe, Cumadóirí agus Athchumadóirí: An Seachadadh Cruthaitheach agus an Chumadóireacht Bhéil i dTraidisiún Amhránaíochta 
na GaelainneTom Boland & Ray Griffin, Autoethnographies of the Hard 
Work of Doing Nothing: Re-writing the Experience of 
Unemployment Domhnall Uilliam Stiùbhart, Murder in Barra, 1609? 
The Killing of the ‘Peursan Mór’ Gearóid Ó hAllmhuráin, Doolin Dischord: Musical Devolution 
in an Irish Micro Soundscape  Mám ón nGort Piaras Ó Droighneáin (eag.), Peigín Uí Chéide: ‘Seanchas na mBan ó Chois Fharraige’  Léirmheasanna / Reviews Tríona Ní Shíocháin, Bláth ’s Craobh na nÚdar: Amhráin Mháire Bhuí
(Ciarán Ó Gealbháin) Proinsias Mac Cana, The Cult of the Sacred Centre: Essays on 
Celtic Ideology
(Gearóid Ó Crualaoich) James Kelly & Ciarán Mac Murchaidh (eag.), Irish and English: Essays on the Irish Linguistic and Cultural Frontier, 1600-1900
 (John Walsh) Sean Williams & Lillis Ó Laoire, Bright Star of the West: Joe Heaney, Irish Song Man(Tríona Ní Shíocháin)Stiofán Ó Cadhla, An tSlat Féithleoige: Ealaíona an Dúchais 
1800-2000 
Maighread A. Challan, Air Bilean an t-Sluaigh: Sealladh air Leantalachd Beul-Aithris Ghàidhlig Uibhist a Tuath 
(Alan Titley) Seán Ó Duinnshléibhe (eag.), Párliment na bhFíodóirí le Dáibhí 
de Barra
(Síle de Cléir)  You can order the journal by e-mail (b.begley@ucc.ie) or by writing to Bláthnaid Ní Bheaglaoich at the Department of Folklore and Ethnology, 5 Elderwood, College Road, University College Cork, Ireland. The relevant order form can be downloaded by clicking on the link below: Irish- and English-language versionsare available, and forms are listed according to location (Éire, Europe, USA, etc). Back issues can also be purchased: individual numbers cost €15 but three issues (6, 7 & 8 for example) can be purchased for €30, including postage. The link to the Departmental Website below also gives an outline of the contents of previous numbers. Link: http://www.ucc.ie/en/bealoideas/research/publications/journals/ GAIRM SCOILE / CALL FOR PAPERS Submissions for the next number (deadline: 1 November 2013) are also sought. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language:JA;}
by L. Cashman
Thursday, August 15, 2013
Stories of Our Lives: Memory, History, Narrative, by Frank de Caro 0 L. Cashman From Utah State University Press:Stories of Our Lives: Memory, History, Narrative, by Frank de CaroThe social importance of personal narratives, family saga, and communal legends are well-established in ethnographic and folkloristic literature, but their value for individual self-knowledge is less often demonstrated. Both a memoir and a research project, Stories of Our Lives considers the stories from Frank de Caro's personal life, as well as the stories he has collected in his years of field research as he explores how the stories we tell, listen to, and learn play an integral role in constructing our temporal selves. De Caro uses his own memories and stories as specimens to call attention to the centrality of oral narration in his life, providing the recollections that all memoirs provide while additionally considering what those stories have meant to his life and sense of self. In doing so, he demonstrates the way in which stories infuse an individual life-expressing, contextualizing, and creating one's sense of self-and how the larger life narrative in turn provides a context for the stories that shape it. ISBN: 978-0-87421-893-0Pages: 220Illustrations: 20 b&w photosPaper, $26.95 Adobe Digital Edition Ebook, $22.00  Order from Utah State University Press at https://cdcshoppingcart.uchicago.edu/Cart/ChicagoBook.aspx?PRESS=utah_state&ISBN=9780874218930Kindle, iBook, Nook and other ebook editions are also available. Please purchase directly from your preferred ebook outlet.
by L. Cashman
Tuesday, August 13, 2013
Delis, deeds of gift, etymology, lullaby scholars in publore 0 L. Cashman Find publore postings in the publore archives at http://list.unm.edu/archives/publore.html; you must subscribe to access. See August 2013, week 2.
by L. Cashman
Monday, August 12, 2013
Jewish delis, Folkstreams map, other topics discussed on publore 0 L. Cashman Find publore postings in the publore archives at http://list.unm.edu/archives/publore.html; you must subscribe to access. See August 2013, week 1.
by L. Cashman
Monday, August 12, 2013
BBC Radio 4 interview with Izzy Young, available until 8/17/13 0 L. Cashman On BBC Radio 4, a 30-minute radio interview with Izzy Young; first broadcast 10 August 2013; available until 17 August 2013: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0381fzj From the BBC Radio 4 website:- One of the UK's most acclaimed folk singers, Seth Lakeman, travels to New York to meet the man regarded a the world's leading expert on folk music, 85 year old Izzy Young who opened his first Folklore Center in New York's Greenwich Village in 1957. The store in MacDougal St became a focal point for the American folk music scene of the time. Bob Dylan writes in his memoirs about spending time at the Center, which he referred to as "The citadel of Americana Folk Music - like an ancient chapel". Dylan met Dave Van Ronk in the store, and Izzy Young produced Dylan's first concert at Carnegie Chapter Hall in 1961. Dylan wrote a song about the store and Young called "Talking Folklore Center". After developing an interest in Swedish folk music at a festival, Young closed his New York store and in 1973 he moved to Stockholm where he opened the Folklore Centrum, where he still works seven days a week. Making a rare return to New York, 40 years since he first left, Izzy joins Seth on the steps of 110 MacDougal St in Greenwich Village - the site of his original Folklore Center - to reminisce about the evocative days in the late 50s and early 60s when, as Bob Dylan recalls, "Folk music glittered like a mound of gold". Wandering up MacDougal Street to Washington Square Park, Izzy describes the events of April 1961, when 'Folkies' staged what would later be referred to as 'the first protest action of the 60s'. When city officials tried to ban folk musicians from performing in the square, Izzy was the main organiser of a protest that resulted in clashes with local police. The protestors eventually won their legal battle with the city and music has been permitted in the square ever since. Producer: Des Shaw A Ten Alps production for BBC Radio 4.
by L. Cashman
Monday, August 12, 2013
The Heart of the Matter: The Humanities and Social Sciences 0 L. Cashman On June 19, 2013, the American Academy Commission on the Humanities and Social Sciences released its report, The Heart of the Matter: The Humanities and Social Sciences for a vibrant, competitive, and secure nation. See the recommendation for  a "culture corps" to be added to the Corporation for National and Community Service on page 6 of the report summary. Both the report and the summary plus a video are available at https://www.amacad.org.
by L. Cashman
Monday, August 12, 2013
Open Book Publishers releases "Storytelling in Northern Zambia" online 0 L. Cashman From: Open Book Publishers, general@openbookpublishers.comNew release: "Storytelling in Northern Zambia: Theory, Method, Practice and Other Necessary Fictions," by Robert CancelAt a time when the idea of the traditional book is rapidly changing, this work harnesses the potential of digital technologies to allow readers to access the primary sources on which research is based. A collection and analysis of northern Zambia’s oral narrative traditions, this book pioneers a new integration of critical text and original audio-visual material, enabling you to watch videos of the storytellers while you read.Cancel’s thorough critical interpretation, meanwhile, makes "Storytelling in Northern Zambia" a much needed addition to the slender corpus of African folklore studies that deal with storytelling performance. Cancel threads his way between the complex demands of African fieldwork studies, folklore theory, narrative modes, reflexive description and simple documentation and succeeds in bringing to the reader a set of performers and their performances that are vivid, varied and instructive. His study tells us not only about storytelling but sheds light on the study of oral literatures throughout Africa and beyond."Storytelling in Northern Zambia" was published on 16 July 2013 and can be read for free online here: <http://www.openbookpublishers.com/product/137> where it is also available in inexpensive digital, paperback and hardback editions.Open Book Publishers is a non-profit organisation, run by academics in Cambridge and London. We are committed to making high-quality research freely available to readers around the world. We rely on our friends and associates to assist in publicizing our books, and we thank you for your support.Contact Catherine Heygate, assistant editor, for more details about this volume or what we do at OBP.
by L. Cashman
Monday, August 12, 2013
"Shout Bands Stir Up Tubular Fervor In Charlotte," NPR Music 0 L. Cashman "Shout Bands Stir Up Tubular Fervor In Charlotte," All Things Considered, August 2, 2013. NPR Music.http://www.npr.org/2013/07/15/201161051/shout-bands-stir-up-tubular-fervor-in-charlotte
by L. Cashman
Monday, August 12, 2013
Publore on collecting Russian folk music, and "American" music abroad 0 L. Cashman Find publore postings in their archives at http://list.unm.edu/archives/publore.html; you must subscribe to access. See July 2013, week 4.
by L. Cashman
Friday, July 26, 2013
Vote to fund conservation at Philadelphia Folklore Project 0 L. Cashman From the Philadelphia Folklore Project:Hate to bother you with one of these crowd-sourcing contests, but if you can, please vote for PFP at http://www.newsworks.org/index.php/temple-contemporary?catid=3#philadelphia-folklore-projectIf we get enough votes,  PFP has a chance to get help from conservators in preserving the Bill and Miriam Crawford Dining room: an incredible collection of social change ephemera and testimony to a life well-lived. If you've been to PFP, you've seen the installation of the Crawford's actual dining room walls:. Bill's 4-walls are a collage of posters and fliers gathered over 40_ years. Conservators would help stabilize the fragile paper and mounting, allowing us to keep the dining room on display in West Philadelphia.You can make this happen by voting at http://www.newsworks.org/index.php/temple-contemporary?catid=3#philadelphia-folklore-projectYou can vote once a day until August 5th. The top 10 vote-getting organizations will get items preserved.Thanks for your help.
by L. Cashman
Friday, July 26, 2013


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