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Stuff You Should Know Podcast: “What is Folklore?” 0 S. Larson The Stuff You Should Know Podcast aims to "educate the public on common things and how they work” and is part of http://www.howstuffworks.com/. The hosts take a stab at explaining folklore. The podcast and transcript are available here: http://www.stuffyoushouldknow.com/?s=folklore
by S. Larson
Thursday, February 11, 2016
ACLS Interviews Lee Haring for Humanities Video Series 0 S. Larson The American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) has just started posting on its web site a series of "humanities videos," in which leading scholars in various fields (who are their societies' delegates to ACLS) talk briefly about their work and about the value of the humanities. Our own Lee Haring is among the first crop of scholars to take part in this project, and his video is available to view at http://www.acls.org/media/humanities_interviews/.  
by S. Larson
Thursday, February 11, 2016
Elder Midwife History Gathering Project 0 S. Larson The Elder Midwife History Gathering Project is devoted to collecting oral histories from senior midwives in the United States and Canada. The facilitators of this project plan to interview at least two "elder midwives” from each state in the USA and each province in Canada. Learn more at http://www.facebook.com/eldermidwifehistorygathering. If you have any questions about the project, contact:   Barbara Grace 719 354 0326    gracedland@gmail.com
by S. Larson
Thursday, February 11, 2016
Folkstreams Develops Film Timeline 0 S. Larson Folkstreams has released a timeline of all its films from 1946 to 2015. The timeline, developed by Zach Nichols, is on a horizontal axis with the films arranged by their cultural regions on a series of vertical rows. Each film links directly to its respective Folkstreams streaming page. Here is the link to the preview: https://cdn.knightlab.com/libs/timeline3/latest/embed/index.html For further information, contact:    Tom Davenport Director, Folkstreams.net 11324 Pearlstone Lane Delaplane, Va 20144 540-592-3701
by S. Larson
Thursday, February 11, 2016
Chennai Storytelling Festival 2016 Videoconference-webcast Now Available 0 S. Larson The Videoconference-webcast, "Conversation About Storytelling,” from the Chennai Storytelling Festival 2016 is now available here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IQlJedGL4TY&feature=youtu.be The Videoconference-webcast was co-hosted in Chennai by Ruth Stotter (of California) and Eric Miller (of New York City). They were joined by Alvin Rajah, Asha Sampath and Chithra Ramachandran in Chennai; and Chetna Mehrotra and Marina Granlund (of Sweden) in Mumbai. The two main themes of the festival (and this videoconference) were:Storytelling relating to the Big Rain of Nov/Dec 2015 (in Chennai and the surrounding vicinity)Storytelling for communication between cultures, between people, and within people, including topics such as travel, tourism, translation, "journey" and "path" as metaphors for life, visiting other lands and worlds, discovery and exploration of the other and of the self.
by S. Larson
Wednesday, February 10, 2016
Smithsonian Center for Folklife & Cultural Heritage Updates Interview Guide 0 S. Larson The Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage has updated one of its most popular resources to reflect current technology: The Smithsonian Folklife and Oral History Interviewing Guide by Marjorie Hunt (2003). "This booklet presents some guidelines Smithsonian folklorists have developed over the years for collecting folklife and oral history from family and community members. It features a general guide to conducting an interview, as well as a sample list of questions that may be adapted to your own needs and circumstances. The booklet concludes with a few examples of ways to preserve and present your findings, a selection of further readings, a glossary of key terms, and sample information and release forms” (The Smithsonian Folklife and Oral History Interviewing Guide).To print or download your own copy for free, go to http://www.folklife.si.edu/the-smithsonian-folklife-and-oral-history-interviewing-guide/smithsonian.  
by S. Larson
Wednesday, February 10, 2016
The Latest Issue of Children's Folklore Review Now Available 0 S. Larson The AFS Children’s Folklore Section has just launched the latest issue of the Children’s Folklore Review (Vol. 37, 2015), which is an entire issue devoted to the life and work of Brian Sutton-Smith. It includes contributions by Elizabeth Tucker, Jay Mechling, and Garry Chick.   If you wish to purchase this issue, please contact Paulina Guerrero at the American Folklore Society: plguerre@indiana.edu.   For more information about the Children’s Folklore Review, please visit http://www.afsnet.org/?page=CFR.
by S. Larson
Tuesday, February 09, 2016
Professor's Scholarship Sparks Intellectual Property Rights Debate 0 S. Larson Many members of the Acoma Pueblo tribe are dismayed by the recent scholarship of Dr. Peter Nabokov, a professor in the Department of World Arts and Cultures at UCLA. In How the World Moves and The Origin Myth of Acoma Pueblo, Nabokov discloses the details of sacred Acoma traditions without having received permission from the tribe. To learn more, follow the link below: Lucas Iberico Lozada, "The Professor and the Pueblo: Was the disclosure of Acoma traditions exploitation or scholarship?" Santa Fe Reporter, January 27, 2016, http://www.sfreporter.com/santafe/article-11510-the-professor-and-the-pueblo.html
by S. Larson
Monday, February 01, 2016
"UMaine Offers Folklore Minor to Students" 0 S. Larson Two years ago, the University of Maine began offering a folklore minor to its students thanks to Professors Pauleena MacDougall - also director of the Maine Folklife Center - and Sarah Harlan-Haughey. The following article, published in the Bangor Daily News, discusses what the minor has to offer for both the university and the state: Shelby Hartin, "UMaine offers folklore minor for students,” Bangor Daily News, January 27, 2016, http://bangordailynews.com/2016/01/27/homestead/umaine-offers-folklore-minor-for-students/ 
by S. Larson
Monday, February 01, 2016
“Shared Knowledge of Songs Bonds Children” 0 S. Larson According to a recent study, children are more likely to bond with other children who know the same songs that they do. Likewise, children will avoid others who do not share the same musical repertoire. Read about the findings here: Tom Jacobs, "Shared Knowledge of Songs Bonds Children,” Pacific Standard, January 20, 2016, http://www.psmag.com/books-and-culture/if-you-dont-know-the-farmer-in-the-dell-youre-no-friend-of-mine 
by S. Larson
Wednesday, January 27, 2016
Recent Study Makes Claims About the Age of Indo-European Folktales 0 S. Larson A recent study published in Royal Society Open Science claims to have "uncovered the ancient roots of Indo-European folktales,” tracing one tale – "The Smith and the Devil” – to the Bronze Age. Since its release last week, the study has been publicized in a variety of news sources and has provoked a lively discussion among folklorists. The original article is available here: Sara Graça da Silva and Jamshid J. Tehrani, "Comparative phylogenetic analyses uncover the ancient roots of Indo-European folktales,” Royal Society Open Science, January 20, 2016, http://rsos.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/3/1/150645#abstract-1 See also the following coverage of the article: Ed Yong, "The Fairy Tales That Predate Christianity, The Atlantic, January 20, 2016, http://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2016/01/on-the-origin-of-stories/424629/ Alison Flood, "Fairytales Much Older Than Previously Thought, Say Researchers," The Guardian, January 20, 2016, http://www.theguardian.com/books/2016/jan/20/fairytales-much-older-than-previously-thought-say-researchers If you are curious about what some of your colleagues have had to say, see the Publore Archives (January 2016, Week 3 and January 2016, Week 4: "The Fairy Tales That Predate Christianity - The Atlantic").  
by S. Larson
Wednesday, January 27, 2016
Asociación para la Difusión de los Estilos Releases Inaugural Newsletter 0 S. Larson The Asociación para la Difusión de los Estilos (Association for the Diffusion of the Styles) is pleased to announce the release of their inaugural newsletter about traditional music and related events, mainly on the Iberian Peninsula. The bilingual (Spanish-English) newsletter will be released monthly. Check it out and subscribe at http://us12.campaign-archive1.com/?u=30788352c7c10a953732454ca&id=74499d387b.  Find out more about the association at www.asociaciondifusionestilos.com.
by S. Larson
Monday, January 25, 2016
“How Outsider Art Entered the Inner Sanctum of World-Class Museums" 0 S. Larson In this interview for Artspace Phillip March Jones - the director of Andrew Edlin Gallery in New York City - discusses his "life and career in outsider art, as a gallerist, foundation director, and an artist with an eye for the Southern vernacular.” The interview is available here: Karen Rosenberg, "How Outsider Art Entered the Inner Sanctum of World-Class Museums: A Q&A With Phillip March Jones,” Artspace, January 13, 2016, http://www.artspace.com/magazine/interviews_features/expert_eye/andrew-edlin-gallery-director-phillip-march-jones-on-outsider-art-53410 
by S. Larson
Wednesday, January 20, 2016
“Smithsonian Folkways' Intimate Look at a Legendary Civil Rights Activist” 0 S. Larson Hearth Music interviews Folklorist Mark Puryear about Songs My Mother Taught Me – an album of recordings by Civil Rights activist Fannie Lou Hamer that was recently released by Smithsonian Folkways. The interview is available here:Hearth Music, "Smithsonian Folkways' Intimate Look at a Legendary Civil Rights Activist,” No Depression: The Roots Music Authority, January 18, 2016, http://nodepression.com/interview/smithsonian-folkways-intimate-look-legendary-civil-rights-activist 
by S. Larson
Wednesday, January 20, 2016
"How to Cowboy Poetry, From Some Veteran Gathering-Goers" 0 S. Larson The 32nd National Cowboy Poetry Gathering, presented by the Western Folklife Center, will take place next week (January 25th-30th) in Elko, Nevada.  "The National Cowboy Poetry Gathering is an annual celebration of the ranching and rural West. Through poetry, music and stories, ranch people express the beauty and challenges of a life deeply connected to the earth and its bounty” ("National Cowboy Poetry Gathering”).  But what exactly goes on at the gathering? If you plan to attend, or if you’re just curious, take a look at the following article: *David Low & Devon Blunden, "How to Cowboy Poetry, From Some Veteran Gathering-Goers,” Travel Nevada, January 2016, http://travelnevada.com/adventures/32865/expert-s-guide-to-cowboy-poetry
by S. Larson
Wednesday, January 20, 2016
The New Special Issue of Ethnologia Europaea Just Released 0 S. Larson The new special issue of Ethnologia Europaea: Journal of European Ethnology volume 45:2 is now available. The special issue is Rage, Anger and other Don’ts. Ethnologia Europaea is edited by Marie Sandberg and Regina F. Bendix. The special issue editor is Regina F. Bendix. The journal is available for purchase, both in print and as an e-journal, on Museum Tusculanum Press’s website: E‐journal: http://www.mtp.hum.ku.dk/details.asp?eln=300369 Printed journal: http://www.mtp.hum.ku.dk/details.asp?eln=300368 In everyday life, emotions like rage, anger or frustration are not, generally, condoned. Indeed, a good part of the work of enculturation is devoted to managing social conduct so as to avoid or suppress emotions considered negative or unproductive. In the ethnographic literature, scrutiny of these kinds of emotional states and their expression is rare, not least because they reside somewhere between the individual and his or her cultural surrounds and are hard to pinpoint.  The authors of the present issue - Rage, Anger and other Don'ts: Cultural Expression and Suppression of the Undesirable and Unbearable in Everyday Life - invite readers to explore practices and discourses within which these kinds of emotions or, more prominently, their disciplining can be grasped ethnologically. Alongside four scholarly articles, four essays encircle the theme in a more literary vein, albeit grounded in careful observation and recollection. The introduction and two final comments seek to frame topics ranging from road rage and the controlling of prisoners' anger to a menopausal kitchen outburst, and to point the way toward further possible research in this largely unexplored realm of culturally shaped practice. About the journal: Ethnologia Europaea is a lively and interdisciplinary, peer‐reviewed journal with a focus on European cultures and societies. It carries material of great interest not only for European ethnologists and anthropologists but also for sociologists, social historians and scholars involved in cultural studies. An impression of the areas covered by the journal is reflected in some of the thematic topics of the issues recently published: European Ethnology Revisited (2014), Foodways Redux (2013), Imagined Families in Mobile Worlds (2012), Irregular Ethnographies (2011), Performing Nordic Spaces (2010), Sense of Community (2009), Europe (2008). The journal was founded in 1967 (first published in 1967) and is published annually (two issues). Since its beginning it has acquired a central position in the international and interdisciplinary cooperation between scholars inside and outside Europe. Ethnologia Europaea is an A ranked journal according to the European Science Foundation journal evaluation (European Reference Index for the Humanities initial list) and a level 2 (top level) journal according to the Norwegian model (in Norway and Denmark). Ethnologia Europaea is edited by associate professor Marie Sandberg (University of Copenhagen, Ethnology Section) and from 2016, professor Monqiue Scheer (Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen) has taken over the co-editorship from Regina F. Bendix. Editorial Board: Pertti Anttonen (Finland), Brita Brenna (Norway), Tine Damsholt (Denmark), Anne Eriksen (Norway), Valdimar Tryggvi Hafstein (Iceland), Renata Jambrešić Kirin (Croatia), Ewa Klekot (Poland), Peter Jan Margry (The Netherlands), Máiréad Nic Craith (United Kingdom), Lotten Gustafsson Reinius (Sweden), Per‐Markku Ristilammi (Sweden), Johanna Rolshoven (Austria), Klaus Schriewer (Spain), Laura Stark (Finland), Birgitta Svensson (Sweden), Jean‐Louis Tornatore (France), Bernhard Tschofen (Switzerland) and Gisela Welz (Germany). Contact: Ethnologia Europaea is published and distributed by: Museum Tusculanum Press Birketinget 6 DK‐2300 Copenhagen Mail: info@mtp.dkTel: +45 3234 1414 For more information visit our website at http://www.mtp.hum.ku.dk/default_e.asp. To see the backlist of Ethnologia Europaea please follow this link: http://www.mtp.hum.ku.dk/searchresult.asp?series=j900008&elected   Selected back issues are available open access at http://www.mtp.hum.ku.dk/default_e.asp.  
by S. Larson
Tuesday, January 19, 2016
"60 Years Later, a Wild, Baffling Recording Finds a Modern Spark" 0 S. Larson The Brothers Nazaroff, a klezmer band with musicians from three different continents, is remaking the 1954 Folkways Record  Jewish Freilach Songs. The tribute is called The Happy Prince in honor of the mysterious "Prince" Nazaroff who put the original album together. Learn more on NPR: Jon Kalish, "60 Years Later, a Wild, Baffling Recording Finds a Modern Spark," NPR  (January 9, 2016), http://www.npr.org/2016/01/09/462434745/60-years-later-a-wild-baffling-recording-finds-a-modern-spark 
by S. Larson
Tuesday, January 12, 2016
Lynne McNeill Gives TED Talk 0 S. Larson Folklorist Lynne McNeill (Utah State University) gives a talk entitled "Folklore doesn't meme what you think it memes" for TEDxUSU. Most people think of folklore as the old, the rural and the rustic. They typically don’t think of the Internet, a technology that, if anything, is commonly judged to be dismantling our culture: destroying our interpersonal skills, squashing our cultural vitality, killing our individual creativity. Surprisingly, however, communications technologies like mobile phones, tablets and computers have become the locus of an expanse of contemporary folk culture. Understanding the nature of folklore helps us identify the positive elements of digital culture (TedxUSU). Watch the talk here: http://tedx.usu.edu/portfolio-items/lynne-mcneill/For more information about TEDxUSU: http://tedx.usu.edu 
by S. Larson
Monday, January 04, 2016
Grammy Award Nominee Jim Leary Featured in Inside UW 0 S. Larson Jim Leary, professor of folklore and Scandinavian studies at the University of Wisconsin, recently received a Grammy Award nomination for “Best Album Notes” for his work on “Folksongs of Another America: Field Recordings from the Upper Midwest, 1937-1946.” The UW Press and Dust-to-Digital Records co-produced the project. Leary reflects on the project and other aspects of his work in the following article: Brooks, Susannah. “Folklorist (and Grammy nominee) Jim Leary Reflects on Studying, Sharing Midwest Culture.” Inside UW. December 16, 2015: http://news.wisc.edu/folklorist-and-grammy-nominee-jim-leary-reflects-on-years-studying-and-sharing-midwest-culture/  
by S. Larson
Monday, January 04, 2016
Small Scottish Knitwear Studio Draws Attention from Major Fashion Designer 0 S. Larson This recent article, published in Bloomberg, covers the story of Mati Ventrillon, whose traditional Scottish knitwear recently inspired Chanel:   Tufnell, Nicholas. "Inside the Tiny Scottish Knitwear Studio that Chanel Couldn’t Resist.” Bloomberg. December 15, 2015: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2015-12-15/the-fair-isle-knitwear-made-by-mati-ventrillon-that-seduced-chanel
by S. Larson
Wednesday, December 16, 2015

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