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English Folk Dance and Song Society Launches Resource Bank 0 A. Intern A free online resource to encourage more people to learn and teach folk related music, dance, drama and arts has been launched by national arts organisation, the English Folk Dance and Song Society (EFDSS). The charity has created the Resource Bank – which is freely available to anyone to browse at www.efdss.org/resourcebank - to encourage more people to learn about traditional music, dance, drama, other arts and customs. The Resource Bank's vibrant and accessible guides to music, dance and culture will be of interest to anyone who wants to learn more about folk, while teachers and educational professionals can access teaching tools including an extensive range of learning materials, audio and video (for streaming or download) to be used in a range of subjects at different levels.
by A. Intern
Friday, June 05, 2015
University Press of Colorado Anniversary Sale 0 A. Intern The University Press of Colorado celebrates 50 years with a 50% off sale now through the end of the year. Any book, any quantity, is now 50% off after you enter the code 50FOR50 at checkout. To purchase a book, go here. 
by A. Intern
Wednesday, June 03, 2015
Acadian Fiddle Website 0 A. Intern A collection of Acadian fiddlers organized by Louis and Devon Léger with the help of the staff at Hearth Music, especially Carl-Eric Tangen. It spans across the Acadian diaspora in Eastern Canada (New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, Cape Breton, The Magdalen Islands, Newfoundland). It’s not meant to be a definitive answer, but more of a resource for people to discover old style Acadian fiddling, which is almost gone these days. Hopefully a forum too to discover new artists as other folks write in. They're working on mainland Nova Scotian Acadian fiddling right now and would like to do Franco-American fiddling in Maine/New England with Acadian roots. To see the website, go here.  
by A. Intern
Wednesday, June 03, 2015
Deb Boykin interviews Dan Sheehy for Alabama Arts Radio Series 0 A. Intern Dan Sheehy, Director and Curator of Smithsonian Folkways Recordings, talks with Deb Boykin about the label’s collection of traditional music from around the world and its “commitment to cultural diversity, education, increased understanding, and lively engagement with the world of sound.” He focuses specifically on the Alabama recordings in the collection and explains how the label’s unique print-by-order process makes otherwise obscure material from the catalog as accessible as possible. Read more and listen in here.
by A. Intern
Tuesday, June 02, 2015
"1,000 Songs From Holocaust Survivors Archived" on NPR 0 L. Cashman Ravenna Koenig, "1,000 Songs From Holocaust Survivors Archived," NPR Music (May 16, 2015): http://www.npr.org/2015/05/16/406967291/1-000-songs-from-holocaust-survivors-archived
by L. Cashman
Monday, May 18, 2015
Anthropology of this Century, Issue 13 (May 2015) 0 L. Cashman The latest issue of AOTC has been posted online and is now freely available to read: http://aotcpress.com/archive/issue-13/ It includes articles by Charles Stafford (on incest and attachment), Rita Astuti (on Theory of Mind), Gregor Dobler (on the work of Jeanne Favret-Saada), Amy J. Cohen (on law and society scholarship) and Nate Roberts (on caste), as well as a feature article on spatial connections in Russia by Caroline Humphrey. ANTHROPOLOGY OF THIS CENTURY (AOTC) publishes reviews of recent works in anthropology and related disciplines, as well as occasional feature articles. There are three issues per academic year – in October, January and May.
by L. Cashman
Monday, May 18, 2015
Gay Traditions 0 L. Cashman Devon Leger has prepared a series for No Depression called Gay Traditions; the idea is to shine a light on gay traditional artists and especially to look at how their connection to tradition has affected their identity: http://nodepression.com/interview/gay-traditions-matthew-lawrences-nw-makah-vision-heritage http://nodepression.com/article/gay-traditions-talking-stepdancer-and-trad-singer-nic-gareiss http://nodepression.com/article/gay-traditions-singerharpist-seumas-gagne-being-gay-gaeldom http://nodepression.com/article/gay-traditions-texas-songwriter-emily-herrings-honky-tonk-pathways http://nodepression.com/article/gay-traditions-ashleigh-flynns-western-mythos -- Devon LegerHearth Music/HearthPRwww.hearthmusic.com Check out the new issue of KITHFOLK, Hearth's digital roots music magazine. Issue #3 is up now! www.kithfolk.com
by L. Cashman
Monday, May 18, 2015
JFR 52:1 released 0 L. Cashman Journal of Folklore Research An International Journal of Folklore and Ethnomusicology Volume 52, Number 1, January-April 2015Contents: Las Colcheras: Spanish Colonial Embroidery and the Inscription of Heritage in Contemporary Northern New Mexico, Kirstin C. Erickson Contingent Collaborations: Patterns of Reciprocity in Museum-Community Partnerships, Daniel C. Swan and Michael Paul Jordan A Case Study in Folklore Archives Management: The Randall V. Mills Archives of Northwest Folklore at the University of Oregon, Nathan Georgitis Filling "An Immense Brain with Very Little in the Brain” for "Perpetual Memory”: Folklore Archiving New and Old, Janet C. Gilmore  Michael Dylan Foster / Associate Professor / Department of Folklore and Ethnomusicology / Indiana University, Editor, Journal of Folklore Research http://jfr.indiana.edu/ This issue can be access via Project Muse and JSTOR: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/journal_of_folklore_research/ http://www.jstor.org/page/journal/jfolkrese/about.html
by L. Cashman
Monday, May 18, 2015
Lomax Centennial and the 1938 Lomax MIchigan Materials 0 L. Cashman A series of materials are now available based on Alan Lomax's pioneering 1938 collecting trip in Michigan. All are related to the Michigan 1938 Project, a collaborative effort to commemorate Lomax's historic documentation in Michigan through a series of complementary initiatives: recordings, an eBook, online access to the Library of Congress Lomax Michigan collection, and the return of selected recordings to their communities of origin. Project partners included the American Folklife Center of the Library of Congress, the Association for Cultural Equity, the University of Wisconsin Center for the Study of Upper Midwest Cultures, and the Michigan State University Museum. For more information on all the project activities, see the following websites: American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, Alan Lomax Collection Michigan Project homepage: http://www.loc.gov/folklife/lomax/michiganproject.html (including a series of Podcasts)The complete Alan Lomax Collection of Michigan and Wisconsin Recordings (now online) http://www.loc.gov/collection/alan-lomax-in-michigan/about-this-collection/Michigan-I-O: Alan Lomax and the 1938 Library of Congress Folk-Song Expedition, Todd Harvey's terrific and pioneering multimedia ebook: http://www.dust-digital.com/michigan/The companion CD to the above, released by Global Jukebox/ACE: http://culturalequity.org/features/globaljukebox/index.phpGuha Shankar's blog on Alan Lomax Goes North, about the documentary film he and Jim Leary did based on Alan's 1938 silent color film footage: http://blogs.loc.gov/loc/2013/08/inquiring-minds-alan-lomax-goes-north/Jim Leary's book, Folksongs of Another America: Field Recordings from the Upper Midwest, 1937–1946 (available May 2015), which includes Lomax Michigan material and the DVD documentary of the 1938 Lomax film footage, mentioned above, http://uwpress.wisc.edu/books/5231.htm The Michigan State University Museum traveling exhibition, "Michigan Folksong Legacy: Grand Discoveries from the Great Depression,” on display at MSUM through Oct. 18, 2015 and available for loan through the museum's traveling exhibition service: http://museum.msu.edu/museum/tes/MIFolksong.htm
by L. Cashman
Monday, May 11, 2015
South Georgia Folklife Collection Launches New Website 0 R. Vanscoyoc    The South Georgia Folklife Collection is a multi-genre ethnographic collection housed in the Archives and Special Collections of Odum Library at Valdosta State University. This collection is an outgrowth of the South Georgia Folklife Project, founded by Dr. Laurie Sommers in 1996. It reflects ten years of field documentation and public programs from 1996-2006. Highlights of the collection include Southeast Georgia Sacred Harp, Okefenokee Music Survey, Flint River fisheries, Traditions of Turpentiners, Folkwriting (Lessons on Place, Heritage and Traditions for the Georgia Classroom), online exhibits, and a radio archives of documentary programs.
by R. Vanscoyoc
Thursday, May 07, 2015
First Issue of Comparative Mythology Journal Available Online 0 R. Vanscoyoc    Issue 1 of Comparative Mythology, a new open-access ejournal produced by the International Association for Comparative Mythology, is now available.
by R. Vanscoyoc
Wednesday, May 06, 2015
Universitas Text Polyglots: Multilingual Editing/Translation by Academics 0 R. Vanscoyoc   Universitas Text Editing is a platform that coordinates several editors, free-lance translators and digital nomads by profession, residing in different countries. It offers professional services of proof-reading, editing and translation of texts. Our team consists of specialists of a variety of nationalities: a native language expert is always going to be at your service to work on your text. Our translators are competent in ancient and modern languages, such as Italian, French, English, Russian, Chinese, Hindi, Bengali. We specialize in multiple academic disciplines within the field of Humanities, with particular focus on linguistics and literature, religious studies, history and philosophy, both western and oriental, social sciences, oral traditions and folkloristics, anthropology, Asian and African studies, ethnomusicology, ethnography and sociolinguistics. Visit http://www.universitastext.com/ or https://www.facebook.com/universitastext for more information.
by R. Vanscoyoc
Friday, April 24, 2015
AFS Women's Section award-winning book: Folklore, Gender, & AIDS in Malawi 0 L. Cashman By Anika WilsonI am happy to announce the publication of my book Folklore, Gender, and AIDS in Malawi: No Secret Under the Sun (Palgrave Macmillan, Nov. 2013). This book explores rumors, gossip, and urban legends related to AIDS and gender conflict in Malawi with a particular emphasis on women’s perspectives and experiences. This is the first book on AIDS and gender in Africa to draw primarily on such narratives. In fall 2014 it was awarded the Elli Kongas-Maranda Prize from the American Folklore Society’s Women’s Section for pioneering and superior work in "women’s traditional, vernacular, or local culture and/or feminist theory and folklore.”Click here for more information: http://bit.ly/folkloregenderAIDSPlease contact me at awilson@uwm.edu for potential speaking engagements.Table of ContentsChapter 1 IntroductionWomen’s stories express both the strengths and limitations they experience in seeking to collectively mitigate risk of HIV infection and reimagine intimate relationships.Chapter 2 Advice is Good Medicine: Marriage, Advice, and the Comforts of HomeDrawing on a combination of interviews and ethnographic reports from local informants, this chapter explores women’s efforts to secure fidelity with actions directed toward altering their husbands’ extramarital sexual relationships.Chapter 3 Funny, Yet Sorrowful: Narratives of Empowerment and Empathy in Woman and Against Woman StrugglesCommunities harbor the sense that stories of woman against woman confrontations are at once a kind of collective or vicarious catharsis and a shameful, morally questionable opposition of vulnerable woman against vulnerable woman.Chapter 4 "Nobody Fears AIDS, Mphutsi is More Fire”: Disease Rumors in the Age of Aids TreatmentRumors of a new sexually transmitted disease called mphutsi shed light on evolving attitudes about AIDS in a time when drug treatment is more widely available than ever.Chapter 5 Mgoneko: Magical Rape, Media Panic, and Gender-Based ViolencePopular urban legends about night sorcerers who use charms to seduce women speak to a gendered experience of helplessness and vulnerability and dramatize the media-fed notion of a gender battle sparked by international human rights organizations.PRAISE:"No Secret seeks to shift attention … to the actual stories told by real people (in this case by Malawians) in the course of their often difficult lives.  The narratives focused on are those turning on love, sexuality, marriage and gender relations in the context of the HIV/AIDS epidemic and generally economically stressed circumstances  … Rather than portraying Malawians as ‘victims’ in the face of penury and disease, [Wilson] seeks to decipher the ways people ‘actively craft responses’ to those conditions.”--Pauline Peters, JFK School of Government Harvard University
by L. Cashman
Friday, March 27, 2015
February 2015 Issue of Museum Magazine "ExpoTime!" Available Online 0 R. Vanscoyoc   View the latest issue at http://www.museum-aktuell.de/expoTime/eTime/ExpoTime!-2015-02/index.html.
by R. Vanscoyoc
Wednesday, March 18, 2015
Cultural Analysis Volume 12 Now Available 0 R. Vanscoyoc   The latest issue of Cultural Analysis, a free online journal by the International Society for Ethnology and Folklore (SIEF), is now available at http://socrates.berkeley.edu/~caforum/about.html.
by R. Vanscoyoc
Wednesday, March 04, 2015
Issue 3 (February 2015) of Déjà Lu Available Online 0 R. Vanscoyoc   The latest issue of Déjà Lu, a publication of the World Council of Anthropological Associations, is now available online at http://www.wcaanet.org/dejalu/index.html.
by R. Vanscoyoc
Thursday, February 26, 2015
Kristin Catherwood, "Untangling tangible and intangible cultural heritage" 0 L. Cashman Kristin Catherwood, "Untangling tangible and intangible cultural heritage," The StarPhoenix (February 14, 2015), http://www.thestarphoenix.com/Untangling+tangible+intangible+cultural+heritage/10814433/story.html
by L. Cashman
Wednesday, February 25, 2015
The Pomegranate: The International Journal of Pagan Studies 16:2 available 0 L. Cashman Issue 16:2 of The Pomegranate: The International Journal of Pagan Studies has now been published online, with print copies coming soon: http://www.equinoxpub.com/journals/index.php/POM/issue/current The publisher does charge for articles (but try to see if your library can get them), although book reviews are free downloads. Contents "Deepening Conversations between Ritual Studies and Pagan Studies;” 
Michelle Mueller"Becoming a Virtual Pagan: ‘Conversion’ or Identity Construction?”
 James R. Lewis"Prevalence and Importance of Contemporary Pagan Practices,”
 Gwendolyn Reece"The Search for ‘Meaning': Occult Redefinitions and the Internet," Morandir Armson"Healing Community: Pagan Cultural Models and Experiences in Seeking Well-Being," 
Kimberly D. KirnerBook reviews by Melissa Harrington, Jason Mankey, Daniel Foor, Christopher Chase, Ronald Hutton, and Sarah Veale. Chas S. Clifton, editor The Pomegranate: The International Journal of Pagan Studies http://www.equinoxpub.com/journals/index.php/POM/index
by L. Cashman
Wednesday, February 25, 2015
Free Trial of Yale's Human Relations Area Files Database 0 R. Vanscoyoc   The eHRAF databases, produced by the Human Relations Area Files (HRAF) at Yale University, are unique in that they facilitate comparisons of cultures by subsistence, including:  Hunter-gatherers Pastoralists Horticulturalists Intensive agriculturalists Ideas for teaching and researching subsistence types using the eHRAF databases can be found on HRAF's home page (Resources tab> Faculty / Researchers). For example, the Explaining Human Culture module on hunter-gatherers highlights the findings of cross-cultural research and is accompanied by classroom exercises. Thanks to many contributions by professors, Teaching eHRAF has a wide variety of online assignments for undergraduate and graduate-level courses. HRAF's home page also provides useful research tools for using the eHRAF databases: sortable and downloadable lists of all the cultures and archaeological traditions; descriptions of subsistence classifications; and methods for refining eHRAF culture results by subsistence type. The image above shows just how uniquely eHRAF processes a search: results appear by region (e.g., Africa), subregion (e.g.,Southern Africa), culture name (e.g., San), and subsistence type (e.g., hunter-gatherers). Uses of eHRAF World Cultures & eHRAF Archaeology for research and teaching include: In-depth study of mostly non-western cultures, ethnic groups, indigenous people, and prehistoric traditions Comparing cultures (past & present) within regions and subregions Worldwide comparisons of societies by subsistence type  Explore the eHRAF databases: http://ehrafworldcultures.yale.edu http://ehrafarchaeology.yale.edu UserN:  hraf83 PassW:  Lozi22 (case sensitive and valid through March 31, 2015)
by R. Vanscoyoc
Wednesday, February 25, 2015
Alan Govenar's "Texas in Paris" Opens Off-Broadway 0 L. Cashman Alan Govenar's new musical play "Texas in Paris" opened in its off-Broadway premiere last week, and is running thru March 1.  See www.texasinparis.comSee http://www.theatermania.com/off-broadway/reviews/texas-in-paris_71622.htm for a review
by L. Cashman
Wednesday, February 11, 2015


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American Folklore Society
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