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“Commentaries on Migration and Borders for Mexico and the U.S." 0 J. Fivecoate Attempts by the new Administration in Washington to restrict immigration and, more recently, to enforce the removal of some categories of undocumented workers has increased the professional and public interest in immigration in the U.S. and abroad. The Society for Applied Anthropology (SfAA) calls your attention to a special issue of our publication, Practicing Anthropology, which includes recent information on several aspects of this topic: Practicing Anthropology, Vol. 38, No. 1, Winter, 2016 “Commentaries on Migration and Borders for Mexico and the U.S.” Co-editors: Profs. Judith Freidenberg and Jorge Durand SfAA has opened access to this issue, without subscription or cost, in order to engage the broader community around contemporary immigration issues. You may access the special issue on immigration at: http://sfaajournals.net/toc/praa/38/1.  SfAA encourages you as well to access podcasted papers which were presented at a recent conference in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The title of the session is “How We Think, Work, and Write about Migration” and may be accessed at: http://sfaa.net/podcast/index.php/podcasts/2017/how-we-think-work-and-write-about-migration/. 
by J. Fivecoate
Wednesday, May 10, 2017
Craft Emergency Relief Fund Program Guidelines 0 J. Fivecoate CERF+’s Craft Emergency Relief Fund program has emergency grants and no-interest loans available to artists working in craft disciplines who have experienced a recent, serious emergency such as illness, injury, fire, theft, or natural disaster. The maximum potential grant for established artists is $6,000, and no-interest emergency recovery loans range from $500 to $9,000. The maximum potential grant for emerging artists is $3,500. For more information, visit https://cerfplus.org/.   
by J. Fivecoate
Thursday, April 20, 2017
The Global Jukebox 0 J. Fivecoate The Global Jukebox explores connections between families of expressive style. One can travel the world of song, dance and language through the Wheel Chart and the Map. Thousands of examples of the world’s music, dance and other expressive behavior will now become available. The Global Jukebox is presented as a free, non-commercial, educational place for everybody, students, educators, scholars, scientists, musicians, dancers, linguists, artists and music fans to explore expressive patterns in their cultural-geographic and diasporic settings and alongside other people’s. By inviting familiarity with many kinds of vocalizing, musicking, moving, and talking, we hope to advance cultural equity and to reconnect people and communities with their creative heritage. There are many ways to explore and listen, experimentally or systematically, with searches or randomly. Visitor’s may read the description of each selection and view the codings, or learn to make codings themselves. Journeys by area specialists and tradition bearers will take visitors into the heart of particular traditions and cultures, and certified Lesson Plans for K through 12 offer historical, ethnographic and educational ways into musical and dance worlds. We hope the Jukebox will become an interactive center for discovering, exploring and researching expressive culture, with links to past and present work in the field, the ability to enlarge the samples of song, dance, and speech, and guidelines for coding each dataset. The site will host teaching systems for both Choreometrics and Cantometrics, and links to information on these projects. With the guidance of experienced music and movement analysts, these resources can enable committed students to learn these systems of analysis at to an extent that suits their needs. We work with curriculum consultants to develop K-12 curricula and college course material. A more profound understanding of expressive culture will help to produce truly global citizens. Descriptive Data The identifying and descriptive data for each song has taken over three years and the work of several individuals to compile, and will remain a work in progress for some time. Culture latitude and longitude come from Glottocode. Local latitudes/longitudes place familiar villages and localities of origin of the material; these are sometimes omitted to approximate due to the scant documentation or due to the movement or disappearance of populations. Ideally, song “titles” or first lines are given in their native languages, but we are not always able to locate this information in the collectors’ notes or in other sources; in such cases we have used English translations or generic descriptive titles. The culture descriptions will take additional months to enter. There are other lacunae, but we hope that our public will be patient. We will gladly receive any corrections and missing information from our visitors or the contributors and performers of the songs here: contact@theglobaljukebox.org. First Americans, Aboriginal Australians and members of other indigenous and ethnic communities should be aware that that this website may contain images, voices or names of deceased persons in audio recordings, film, or in print. Descriptive data and analyses on this site may contain terms reflecting authors’ views or the period in which the documentation was gathered, and may not be considered correct or appropriate today. This material may not reflect current understanding or the views of the Association for Cultural Equity, but is provided for scientific and historical accuracy. The Legacy of an Historic Project The Global Jukebox makes available to the general public, scholars and scientists all of the data and many of the analyses of the research into the expressive arts carried out under the direction of Alan Lomax and the anthropologist Conrad Arensberg from 1960 to 1995 at Columbia University and Hunter College/CUNY. It contains all of the coded data and analyses of Cantometrics, Choreometrics, Parlametrics, Phonotactics, Minutage, Thematic Analysis, Instruments and Orchestras, and Socio-Cultural Factors. These are comparative studies of expressive style in relation to culture undertaken by Lomax with Arensberg, Victor Grauer, Irmgard Bartenieff, Forrestine Paulay, Norman Markel, Edwin Erickson, Roswell Rudd, Andrew Kaye, Norman Berkowitz, Michael Del Rio and others. It was an exciting project that generated considerable controversy, and returned a mother load of intriguing results. We have begun testing these and when we release the data, we hope that others will follow suite. Our intention is twofold: to make the data available to science, and through the experience of the Global Jukebox, make the media and database available to everyone. It will be possible to add new samples. If visitors want to create their own libraries of songs, metadata, codings, and keep their own notes on the site, we can make this possible. We will add analytic tools so that visitors may investigate and experiment on their own. Patterns graphs and maps the occurrence of musical traits, as requested by the user. Similarities compare all items in a data set to determine which are most similar in which parameters. Correlations will calculate correspondences between social factors and performance data, or between one set of performance data and another. We are performing new analyses of the data. They will be shared, visualized and explained on the Jukebox. The comparative method emphasized here offers but one, albeit fruitful, avenue to understanding expressive systems. It is complementary to other ethnographic and historical approaches rich in contextual detail and analytic refinement. When used together these approaches are powerful and illuminating. To view the Global Jukebox and to find out more, visit http://theglobaljukebox.org/. 
by J. Fivecoate
Thursday, April 20, 2017
"Where do Your NEA Dollars Really Go?" 0 J. Fivecoate “ANDREWS, Ind. — Viki Graber’s sneakers slosh in the wet grass as she twists two willow branches to form an arch. This 30-foot-long tunnel, an installation and playful passageway being built in Salamonie State Park, is the National Endowment for the Arts at work in Mike Pence country. And it’s anything but an easy gig for Graber, 53, a basket weaver. She sleeps in an unheated cabin nearby — home is 90 minutes north — as she creates her work. For this, she will get $3,000. Two hours south, in Indianapolis, NEA money is helping Big Car revive a neighborhood. The nonprofit group is converting 10 bungalows and a shuttered church — all abandoned in recent years — into artist housing. With the help of a $10,000 NEA grant, Big Car has curated a sound exhibition that’s installed in almost a dozen spaces, including a library, bookstore and botanical garden. Once blighted and barely alive, Cruft Street now thumps with activity... “We’re going into communities where there is so little access to the arts,” says Jon Kay, the director of Traditional Arts Indiana, which helped coordinate the NEA funding of Graber’s project. “If we lose NEA support, these traditions will be gone.” The NEA’s budget is modest but designed to reach out to people outside big cities. The agency gives nearly $50 million of its $150 million annual budget to state arts councils so they can, in turn, distribute money to local programs and artists. Those contributions come with a built-in multiplier, as the NEA requires arts councils to match the federal government’s contributions. In addition, in fiscal 2015, the NEA awarded more than 300 grants totaling $7.7 million for projects in rural areas.” To read the full article, visit https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/not-just-welfare-for-elites-a-36-hour-tour-through-indiana-shows-where-your-nea-dollars-really-go/2017/04/13/62fc0b0a-1ee8-11e7-a0a7-8b2a45e3dc84_story.html?utm_term=.72b67adbcc48.   
by J. Fivecoate
Thursday, April 20, 2017
Legend Database Recipient of 2017 Digging into Data Award 0 J. Fivecoate The Intelligent Search Engine for Belief Legends (ISEBEL) provides intelligent search and analysis across three of the world’s largest machine actionable folklore collections (Dutch Folktale Database-Meertens Instituut, Amsterdam, the Danish Folktale Database-UCLA, and the Mecklenburger Folklore Database-WossiDiA, Rostock) presenting the opportunity for large scale data-driven research into traditional folk expressive culture. By facilitating search, discovery and analysis across all three collections, ISEBEL provides researchers an unprecedented opportunity to discover patterns both within and across the target corpora. The proposed research, focusing on storytellers, legends and the dispersion of beliefs in magic, witchcraft, hauntings and supernatural beings seeks to reveal what ordinary people believed, and how storytelling traditions and story repertoires differed in and across these three areas. Principal Investigators Theo Meder, Meertens Instituut, Netherlands, NWO Holger Meyer, University of Rostock, Germany, DFG Christoph Schmitt, University of Rostock, Germany, DFG Tim Tangherlini, University of California, Los Angeles, United States, NEH For more information, visit https://diggingintodata.org/awards/2016.   
by J. Fivecoate
Friday, April 14, 2017
National Recording Registry Announces 2016 Recording Registry 0 J. Fivecoate “This year’s exciting list gives us a full range of sound experiences,” said Hayden. “These sounds of the past enrich our understanding of the nation’s cultural history and our history in general.” Under the terms of the National Recording Preservation Act of 2000, the Librarian, with advice from the Library’s National Recording Preservation Board (NRPB), is tasked with annually selecting 25 titles that are “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant” and are at least 10 years old. More information on the National Recording Registry can be found here. The recordings selected for the 2016 registry bring the total number of titles on the registry to 475, a small part of the Library’s vast recorded-sound collection of nearly 3 million items.  The recordings named to the registry feature a rich and diverse array of spoken-word and musical recordings—representing nearly every musical category—spanning the years 1888 to 1997.  Among the 2016 selections are Harry Richman’s 1929 “Puttin’ on the Ritz”; Big Mama Thornton’s 1953 “Hound Dog”; Sonny Rollins’ 1956 “Saxophone Colossus”; Wilson Pickett’s 1965 “In the Midnight Hour”; Talking Heads’ 1980 “Remain in Light”; Marty Robbins’ 1959 “Gunfighter Ballads and Trail Songs”; the 1960 album “The Incredible Jazz Guitar of Wes Montgomery”; David Bowie’s 1972 apocalyptic concept album “The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars”; and Sister Sledge’s 1979 hit single “We Are Family.” To read the full article, visit https://www.loc.gov/item/prn-17-029/.   
by J. Fivecoate
Friday, April 14, 2017
A Popular ‘40s Map of American Folklore was Destroyed by Fears of Communism 0 J. Fivecoate By Kyle Carsten Wyatt -- “Between 1946 and 1953, the State Department’s Overseas Library Program collected and distributed some 1,744 copies of William Gropper’s America: Its Folklore, a colorful depiction of 61 legends, tall tales, and literary heroes—characters like super-sized cowboy Pecos Bill in New Mexico, steel-driving phenom John Henry in Alabama, and witty trickster Br’er Rabbit in Georgia—superimposed over a familiar projection of the Lower 48. The purchase was part of postwar efforts to disseminate “facts and solidly documented explanations of the United States.” Based on a painting Gropper completed in 1945, the 34-by-23-inch pictorial map was published by Associated American Artists, and sold by mail order—$5.00 unframed, $14.50 mounted—in the New York Times, Life, and other popular publications. An accompanying 16-page brochure told viewers more about Paul Bunyan, Johnny Appleseed, and their folkloric ilk. While the State Department exploited the map’s propaganda potential abroad—its playful characterization of America as a fun-loving, welcoming, and, most important, free land—librarians and teachers took advantage of its educational usefulness at home. Throughout the late ’40s and early ’50s, newspapers from coast to coast ran stories about students studying literature with the help of America: Its Folklore. Municipal libraries even lent framed copies, making it easy for students to show off their newfound knowledge at home. But the cartographic darling fell from grace in the spring of 1953, when attorney Roy Cohn toured State Department libraries around the world as part of his and Senator Joseph McCarthy’s crusade against Communism. Cohn identified William Gropper as one of the “fringe supporters and sympathizers” whose supposedly Communist-directed works had infiltrated the Overseas Library Program. Gropper was promptly subpoenaed to appear before the Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations—and earned the dubious distinction of being among the first blacklisted artists in McCarthy-era America.” To read the full article, visit http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/william-gropper-map-american-folklore?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=atlas-page.   
by J. Fivecoate
Wednesday, March 29, 2017
Zora Neale Hurston's Work Featured on NPR Podcast 0 J. Fivecoate On the episode titled "Badass Ladies in Labs" of the NPR podcast "The Pulse," Zora Neale Hurston and her work are discussed. That particular segment begins around the 3 minute mark.  To listen to the episode, visit http://www.npr.org/podcasts/381443461/the-pulse. 
by J. Fivecoate
Friday, March 24, 2017
AFS Member Hanna Griff-Slevin Featured in New York Jewish Week Article 0 J. Fivecoate “The Jewish people invented the idea of diaspora and have experienced nearly 2,000 years of wandering the globe, refugees and immigrants receiving a dubious welcome almost everywhere. Of course, one result of that history is that the Jews have left behind a lot of literal and metaphorical baggage. The former, mere material goods, can be replaced, but the latter — a rich tapestry of languages, literature, music and other arts — is harder to recover. Hanna Griff-Slevin, the director of cultural programs for the Museum at Eldridge Street, admits that it is the music that speaks to her most vividly, which is probably why for the past five years the museum has been showcasing its wonderfully creative “Lost and Found Music” series. “I remember my grandfather singing zmirot and nigunim when I was a child,” she says. “And as a folklorist I fell in love with the old Yiddish music.” Inevitably, when she came to Eldridge Street, music was in the forefront of her thoughts — especially when she realized that the building’s main performance space was an acoustical gem. “The sound is gorgeous,” she says rapturously. So is the space itself, a 125-year-old synagogue that has undergone extensive restoration in the past decade with impressive results.” To read the full article, visit http://jewishweek.timesofisrael.com/next-gen-players-old-world-music/.   
by J. Fivecoate
Thursday, March 9, 2017
"Who Owns Oral History? A Creative Commons Solution" 0 J. Fivecoate By Jack Dougherty and Candace Simpson -- "Who “owns” oral history? When an oral history narrator shares her story in response to questions posed by an interviewer, and the recording and transcript are deposited in an archive, who holds the rights to these historical source materials? Who decides whether or not they may be shared with the public, quoted in a publication, or uploaded to the web? Who decides whether someone has the right to earn money from including an interview in a commercially distributed book, video, or website? Furthermore, does Creative Commons, a licensing tool developed by the open access movement to protect copyright while increasing public distribution, offer a better solution to these questions than existing oral history protocols? "Oral historians have begun to ask these types of questions as we confront new challenges of doing our work in the Internet era. At a November 2010 planning symposium for the Oral History in the Digital Age project, law and technology professor Sheldon Halpern posed the provocative question: “What do you think you own?” One of the symposium participants, Troy Reeves, reflected on its broad implications for the field. Over a decade ago, when narrators granted an oral history interview and signed a release form, they could assume that the audio/video recording and transcript “would remain under the care and control” of an archive or library, which would hold ownership rights and grant access to the public as it deemed appropriate. But the Web is dramatically revising these assumptions." To read the full article, visit http://ohda.matrix.msu.edu/2012/06/a-creative-commons-solution/. 
by J. Fivecoate
Friday, February 24, 2017
Bill Ferris Receives Mississippi Governor’s Arts Award 0 J. Fivecoate AFS Fellow Bill Ferris was recently awarded a Mississippi Governor’s Arts Award for lifetime achievement. For more information, see http://www.arts.state.ms.us/news/GovArtsAwards-2017Recipients.php. Or visit http://www.afsnet.org/news/news.asp?id=310688&hhSearchTerms=%22bill+and+ferris%22. 
by J. Fivecoate
Friday, February 24, 2017
The Bess Lomax Hawes Collection Now Searchable Online 0 J. Fivecoate The finding aid for the Bess Lomax Hawes Collection, 1894-2009, is now online. The collection can be reached by visiting http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.afc/eadafc.af016012.    Also this calendar year, her digitized manuscript collection is scheduled to be added to a larger online collection of Lomax family papers, which currently number around 300,000 pages. More about that effort at http://blogs.loc.gov/folklife/2017/01/nearly-300000-lomax-documents-now-accessible-online/.   
by J. Fivecoate
Tuesday, February 21, 2017
The North Carolina Folklife Institute Launches New Website and New Projects 0 J. Fivecoate The North Carolina Folklife Institute (NC Folk) is proud to announce the completion of its new website, www.ncfolk.org. Please check out their new home base! NC Folk is also proud to announce the first edition of the Handbook for North Carolina Folk and Traditional Artists, with a model provided by the Nevada Arts Council and with priceless assistance and advice provided by NV Folklife Program Coordinator, Patricia Atkinson. https://www.ncfolk.org/handbook/ They are also pleased to announce the production of our first podcast, Inside NC. Produced by Joseph O'Connell, Inside NC's inaugural season focuses on the culture, community and history of Warren and Halifax Counties in NC. The first episode will be streaming from our website on Wednesday, February 15. https://www.ncfolk.org/podcasts/
by J. Fivecoate
Monday, February 13, 2017
Help Support Film about Folklore Center Legend Izzy Young 0 J. Fivecoate By Rebecca Seeman (Co-Producer, "Folklore Center Blues: The Life of Izzy Young") -- "Folklore Center Blues: The Life of Izzy Young" is a film about the colorful figure who produced the first New York concerts of many of the great icons of the American folk music scene, including Bob Dylan, Joni Mitchell, Emmylou Harris, and Tim Buckley. In the current state of activism and resistance, Tamsin (director and co-producer) and I have been remembering the role folk music played in the protest era of the 1960s, and Izzy's lifelong commitment to peace, progressive politics, and activism. In addition to his work in the political protest climate of the 60s, Izzy has been an active voice for Israeli-Palestinian peace since moving to Sweden in 1973. "Folklore Center Blues: The Life of Izzy Young" includes interviews with many people for whom folk music has been an integral part of their commitment to social justice, not least the late great Pete Seeger and the indefatigable Steve Earle. Other critical voices of the 60s folk music scene that you will see and hear in our film include John Sebastian, David Grisman, Happy Traum, David Bromberg, Stefan Grossman, Jim Kweskin, John Cohen, Sylvia Tyson, and lots more. We are almost mid-way through our 30-day campaign to raise the funds for the edit of our film, and we will need the support of the folk music and folklore communities to be able to complete our project. Please help us bring you this entertaining, important, and timely film! We have lots of great perks for you to choose from. You can see our video in which we tell you about the movie, plus the film trailer, in the link below. For those of you that would like to contribute, but don't want to do so online, just send me an email and we can talk about how to do that. For more information about this project, or to donate, visit https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/folklore-center-blues#/.  
by J. Fivecoate
Thursday, February 9, 2017
ASIL Hosts Online Briefings on Trump Administration and International Law 0 J. Fivecoate The American Society of International Law—one of AFS’s sister societies in the American Council of Learned Societies—has begun an online briefing series on “International Law and the Trump Administration.” These are free events, with a one-step registration process (http://www.asil.org/100days) designed to encourage broad participation by both the press and the public. Our hope is to provide accurate, unbiased information (a.k.a. “facts”) to help inform the debate around such issues as climate change, torture, and the role of international institutions. The initial webcast, “The Future of International Agreements,” took place on February 1. It featured Catherine Amirfar, Partner at Debevoise & Plimpton LLP, former Counselor on International Law to the Legal Adviser at the US Department of State and John B. Bellinger, III, Partner at Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer LLP, former Legal Adviser, US Department of State. Michael Goldhaber, who served for 16 years as senior international correspondent for The American Lawyer, served as moderator.  Part two of this series, titled The United Nations and the Trump Administration, will take place on Thursday, February 23, 2017 from 11:30am to 12:30pm EST/8:30am to 9:30am PST. For more information, visit https://www.asil.org/100days.  
by J. Fivecoate
Thursday, February 2, 2017
CBU Professor Ian Brodie Interviewed about Folk and Culture Online Course 0 J. Fivecoate What makes a food traditional? Can you change the ingredients? These are among the topics being discussed in a Folk and Culture course offered at CBU. The course is open and online. Professor Ian Brodie discusses food as tradition in an interview on Mainstreet Cape Breton.  To listen to the interview and to learn more, visit http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/programs/mainstreetcapebreton/cbu-professor-ian-brodie-folk-and-culture-online-course-1.3942744.
by J. Fivecoate
Wednesday, January 25, 2017
Nearly 300,000 Lomax Documents Now Accessible Online 0 J. Fivecoate By Todd Harvey (Curator, Alan Lomax Collection, American Folklife Center) -- Fans of folk music fire up your browsers! The second—and largest—phase of the Lomax family papers has just gone online at this link. This set of manuscripts joins ca. 25,000 items that went online last fall. Researchers now have access to nearly 300,000 manuscript pages that chronicle the work of one of the most important families in American folk music. Through correspondence, field work, research documents, indexes, and writings, the Lomax family papers span the entire 20th century and provide unique insight into American vernacular music. Consistent with Alan Lomax’s “cultural equity” mantra, the collections also document language, storytelling, dance, and music of nearly 800 culture groups from around the world. To read the full post and learn more, visit http://blogs.loc.gov/folklife/2017/01/nearly-300000-lomax-documents-now-accessible-online/.    
by J. Fivecoate
Wednesday, January 25, 2017
NEA Video Explains How They Support Folk and Traditional Arts in America 0 J. Fivecoate "Learn how the National Endowment for the Arts supports and celebrates the folk and traditional arts in America in this motion graphic. Voiced by Carolyn Mazloomi, 2014 NEA National Heritage Fellow" To watch the video, visit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4NiPrrBBCJA&feature=share&app=desktop. 
by J. Fivecoate
Friday, January 13, 2017
Folklorist Bob Fulcher Mentioned in Oak Ridge Today Article 0 J. Fivecoate "A Clinton folklorist was was one of 10 people to be presented with a 2017 Governor’s Arts Award, Tennessee’s highest honor in the arts. Folklorist Bob Fulcher of Clinton won a Folklife Heritage Award. He is the first folklorist to receive the Tennessee Folklife Heritage Award. Fulcher is the park manager of the Cumberland Trail State Scenic Trail. Among the distinguished artists honored are Kallen Esperian, Amy Grant, and Vince Gill, a press release said. The awards were announced Thursday by Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam and First Lady Crissy Haslam." To read the full article, visit http://oakridgetoday.com/2016/12/22/clinton-man-receives-folklife-heritage-award-distinguished-artists-honored-include-vince-gill-amy-grant/.  
by J. Fivecoate
Friday, January 13, 2017
Introducing HP_folk, A New Listserv for Folklore and Historic Preservation 0 J. Fivecoate The AFS Working Group on Folklore and Historic Preservation invites all those interested to join their new Google group, to connect a cross-disciplinary community of individuals interested in the integration of folklore methodology in historic preservation. If you'd like to become part of this network, please contact Laurie Sommers at folklaurie@gmail.com.     
by J. Fivecoate
Wednesday, November 30, 2016

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