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Bill Ivey to appear on PBS NewsHour 0 L. Cashman Former AFS President Bill Ivey's new book, Handmaking America: A Back-to-Basics Pathway to a Revitalized American Democracy, was published by Counterpoint Press on September 12th. Jeffrey Brown of the PBS NewsHour will interview Bill about the book next week, and the interview will appear on the NewsHour on Friday evening, October 5.
by L. Cashman
Monday, October 01, 2012
Festival of World Sacred Music 2012 0 L. Cashman Evangeline Kim announces:Text: http://worldmusic.nationalgeographic.com/view/page.basic/article/content.article/fes_2012_evangeline1/en_US;jsessionid=23AC1E3B0B4BD6A2DBC1A998563A4E4FInterview with Dr. Michael Barry: http://admin.worldmusic.nationalgeographic.com/view/page.basic/article/content.article/michael_barry_interview_fes/en_USGallery: http://worldmusic.nationalgeographic.com/view/page.basic/gallery/content.gallery/fes_culture/en_USMy music coverage of the festival will eventually appear with an interview with Dr. Leili Anvar.
by L. Cashman
Monday, October 01, 2012
Cultural Analysis Volume 10: Narrative Spaces in a Multicultural City 0 R. Vanscoyoc The editors of Cultural Analysis are pleased to announce that our tenth volume has now been published to the web! This volume, produced in conjunction with SIEF, was guest edited by Maria Yelenevskaya and Larisa Fialkova. It features articles and discussion by Goran Janev, Tiiu Jaago, Ekaterina Protassova and Anu Reponen, Orna Blumen and Shay Tzafrir, Elena Nosenko-Stein, Vanda Vitti, Svetlana Amosova, Kira Kaurinkoski, and the editors. It also includes reviews by Devorah Kalekin-Fishman, Francesca Stella, and Boris Czerny. The volume can be viewed as html or pdf on our website. http://socrates.berkeley.edu/~caforum Print volumes can be ordered on-demand at: http://tinyurl.com/cctgqu8
by R. Vanscoyoc
Monday, October 01, 2012
Georgia state archives closed to public 0 L. Cashman Due to budget cuts, Georgia is closing the state archives to the public on November 1, 2012. They had already cut back to being open just two days per week. Now they will be open by appointment only. http://www2.wsav.com/news/2012/sep/13/breaking-georgia-closes-state-archives-ar-4538200/  
by L. Cashman
Monday, September 17, 2012
The Legend of Ponnivala 1 L. Cashman I am happy to share the good news that a project I have worked on for nearly 50 years has just become accessible to all via the internet. The Legend of Ponnivala is a major South Indian oral folk epic that I collected in 1965 from a singing bard. I have now overseen its animation in 26 colorful episodes using artwork inspired by genuine South Indian folk traditions. My team and I have also compressed the story into 26 full color graphic novels. As culturally informative reading books for young people The Legend of Ponnivala is a vividly entertaining adventure story. As a resource that invites insightful analysis by college students wishing to learn about India, the Ponnivala story presents many indigenous Hindu folk ideals in a crystallized, colorful and memorable form. Series 1 of the larger Ponnivala graphic novel set is available now as 13 ebooks in English on Amazon Kindle. Series 2, along with a Tamil language edition, will be available shortly. Just type "Ponnivala” in Kindle’s search box, or go directly to http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Ddigital-text&field-keywords=ponnivala (Kindle reader apps are available for a wide variety of devices and desktop platforms at no cost from http://www.amazon.com/gp/feature.html/ref=sv_kinh_1?ie=UTF8&docId=1000493771) Teachers interested in using some of my analytic essays and study guides on various Ponnivala topics are welcome to contact me. Our animated videos, including two feature-length overviews of the story, are also available for classroom use. Some key points of study include the roles of various Hindu gods and goddesses, traditional family structure and social values, the nature of political leadership, mythic tales of creation, core events in medieval Indian history, links to the Mahabharata and much more. I hope you will join me in discovering more about The Legend of Ponnivala, my passion and the focus of my work for more than four decades! Yours sincerely, Brenda Beck Adjunct Professor, Department of Anthropology, The University of Toronto
by L. Cashman
Monday, September 17, 2012
Art Works podcast: Al Head, 2012 Bess Lomax Hawes National Heritage Fellow 0 L. Cashman The latest podcast on the NEA Art Works web-site features Al Head, Director of the Alabama State Council on the Arts, and 2012 Bess Lomax Hawes National Heritage Fellowship recipient:http://www.arts.gov/podweb/podCMS/podlist.php
by L. Cashman
Monday, September 17, 2012
Oxford American video: "Bill C. Malone: Scholarly Hero of Country Music" 0 L. Cashman Bill Malone is featured in this short article and video from the Oxford American.http://www.oxfordamerican.org/articles/2012/sep/12/solost-bill-c-malone-scholarly-hero-country-music/
by L. Cashman
Monday, September 17, 2012
Arts Readiness Movement Gains Momentum 0 L. Cashman ATLANTA -- Sept. 12, 2012 – September is National Preparedness Month, and South Arts, developer of the ArtsReady online planning tool, has engaged hundreds of arts organizations toward the creation of customized readiness plans. Local arts councils, museums, media organizations, performing arts centers, dance companies, music ensembles and regional theatre companies have begun the process of creating or updating their business continuity plans for post-crisis sustainability."Of course personal and family preparedness come first, but arts leaders also need to ensure that their organizations are protected through a readiness plan,” said Gerri Combs, executive director of South Arts. "Knowing what you will do to keep your operations running is critical if a crisis of any type or size occurs.”Arts organizations around the nation have suffered from an array of unexpected crises thus far in 2012, demonstrating the variety of disasters that can occur. The Mariposa, Calif., Arts Council offices were completely destroyed by fire; a car crashed into the street-front offices of the Orchestra of the Southern Finger Lakes, N.Y.; and the Minnesota Ballet lost 90% of the company’s sets and backdrops to flood damage."Few of us in the arts profession have been trained in business continuity planning,” said Mollie Lakin-Hayes, South Arts deputy director and director of ArtsReady. "Hurricanes Katrina and Rita and their impact on the Gulf Coast’s arts communities opened our eyes and became the catalyst for developing ArtsReady. The online tool was designed by and for the arts community, and requires no prior readiness planning experience. Users are prompted to assess their organization’s vulnerabilities, create an action plan, and train staff,” added Lakin-Hayes.The ArtsReady tool, which launched in September 2011, also includes the ArtsReady Library, a collection of arts-specific examples, articles, templates and resources around readiness, response and recovery; the ArtsReady Battle Buddy Network, which connects arts organizations who can aid one another when crisis hits, and issues ArtsReady Alerts as reminders and warnings when weather or other crises may threaten a community. In its first year of operations, ArtsReady has served arts organizations in 36 states across the country and the District of Columbia, representing the performing, visual and multidisciplinary arts."Our cultural assets must be better protected from damage or loss,” said Executive Director, Combs. "Arts leaders, board members, funders and patrons should all be concerned about whether the arts organizations they care about are able to survive a crisis.”The combined creative industries revenue in South Arts’ nine-state region of $142.6 billion, through the activities of artists and organizations – both nonprofit and commercial – represents a significant part of the region’s economy. The 83,000 creative industry establishments located in the South employ 1.2 million workers.Several national arts service organizations and state arts agencies have partnered with South Arts to bring the ArtsReady tool to their constituents, including the Mississippi Arts Council, Kentucky Arts Council, Association of Performing Arts Presenters, Theatre Communications Group, and Americans for the Arts, among others.###Creative Economy statistic from Creative Economies in the South, published by South Arts, 2011.About ArtsReadyArtsReady is a web based emergency preparedness platform designed to provide arts organizations ith customized business continuity plans for post crisis sustainability. A national initiative of South Arts, the ArtsReady readiness, response and recovery tool was developed in partnership with the University of California/Berkeley and Fractured Atlas. Major ArtsReady support is provided by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, National Endowment for the Arts and the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. For more information, visit www.artsready.org.About South ArtsSouth Arts, a nonprofit regional arts organization, was founded in 1975 to build on the South’s unique heritage and enhance the public value of the arts. South Arts’ work responds to the arts environment and cultural trends with a regional perspective. South Arts offers an annual portfolio of activities designed to address the role of the arts in impacting the issues important to our region, and to link the South with the nation and the world through the arts. For more information, visit www.southarts.org.The organization works in partnership with the state arts agencies of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. It is funded by the National Endowment for the Arts, member states, foundations, businesses and individuals.
by L. Cashman
Monday, September 17, 2012
USC Lancaster Native American Studies Center Opens; follow on Facebook 0 L. Cashman On October 4th, the USC Lancaster Native American Studies Program will host a public open house to inaugurate the opening of its new center. Faculty and staff of this 15,000 square foot facility in historic downtown Lancaster invite the public to tour the new Native American Studies Center at 119 South Main Street from 5 pm to 7 pm. Guests will have the opportunity to tour the NAS Center’s gallery spaces, archives, classrooms, and archaeology, language, and folklife/oral history labs. Refreshments will be provided and performers and artists will be on hand to demonstrate Native American traditions. Through a partnership between USCL and the City of Lancaster, the Native American Studies Center was established to promote regional Native American art, culture, and history. Home to the world’s largest collection of Catawba Indian pottery, the state’s only university archive devoted to South Carolina’s Native cultures, a 200,000 piece collection of artifacts from the Ice Age to the present, the area’s only Catawba linguist, an on-going Native American folklife and oral history project, and the only Native American Studies academic program in the state, the NAS Center will offer exhibits of regional Native American Art, classes and workshops, a public archaeology lab, and other public programs. Following the Oct. 4th open house, the NAS Center will be open Tuesdays through Sundays and Mondays by appointment. Both the public open house and regular admission are free. For details, call 803-313-7172, email criswese@mailbox.sc.edu, or visit usclancaster.sc.edu/NAS. Visit us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/#!/groups/95434605754/ or http://www.facebook.com/#!/nativeamericanstudies . Stephen Criswell, Ph.D.Director of Native American StudiesAssociate Professor of English and FolkloreUSC LancasterLancaster, SC 29720(803) 313-7108
by L. Cashman
Monday, September 17, 2012
Art Works Blog Names NEA Heritage Fellows in Top 5 Musicians 0 L. Cashman In a recent Art Works Blog,podcast producer Jo Reed, picked her 5 favorite podcast interviews with musicians, out of over 100.  Of the five, three are National Heritage Fellows - Andy Statman, Liz Carroll, and Chuck Brown.http://artworks.arts.gov/?p=14612
by L. Cashman
Monday, September 17, 2012
NYTimes article on trends in ethnographic film making 0 L. Cashman Dennis Lim, "The Merger of Academia and Art House: Harvard Filmmakers’ Messy World" New York Times (8/31/2012) at http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/02/movies/harvard-filmmakers-messy-world.html?_r=1
by L. Cashman
Monday, September 17, 2012
NPR audio report on Coon Dog Cemetary in Alabama 0 L. Cashman Audio: "A Resting Place For Hunting Hounds In Alabama," by Debbie Elliiott on NPR: http://www.npr.org/2012/09/03/160119854/a-resting-place-for-hunting-hounds-in-alabama
by L. Cashman
Monday, September 17, 2012
Digital Dharma: The Art of Preservation in a Copy-Paste World 0 L. Cashman Maggie Jackson blog: Digital Dharma: The Art of Preservation in a Copy-Paste World at http://maggie-jackson.com/2012/08/08/digital-dharma-the-art-of-preservation-in-a-copy-paste-world/: on documentary, directed by Dafna Yachin, about E. Gene Smith, a scholar of Tibetan literature who worked on the preservation and reproduction of tens of thousands of rare, seminal Tibetan texts from a canon integral to the history of Buddhism.
by L. Cashman
Monday, September 17, 2012
Effects on community of the filming of "Deliverance" 0 L. Cashman http://www.marketplace.org/topics/life/40-years-later-deliverance-causes-mixed-feelings-georgia
by L. Cashman
Monday, September 17, 2012
New OSU Center for Folklore Studies Website and Facebook Page 0 C. Patterson The Center for Folklore Studies at Ohio State is excited to announce that we have a new website! Take a moment to poke around and check it out! The URL is the same: simply visit http://cfs.osu.edu/. You will be able to find all of the same information from the old site on the new one, only some of it will be either updated or stored in a new location.  Friends of CFS will find the Events page very helpful for keeping informed about the year's lectures, workshops and lunches; instructors will benefit especially from our PDFs of course syllabi; and students can learn more about the field by visiting our Folklore Resources pages and links. The Center for Folklore Studies also has a new Facebook page, which I encourage all of you to "like," share with friends, and interact with. The page is designed to keep everyone abreast of our activities as well as to create a space where we can post folklore resources, news, and events, so share away!If you would like us to add your program to our website or mention your projects on our Facebook page, email me at patterson.493@osu.edu.
by C. Patterson
Tuesday, September 04, 2012
Black Europe pre-publication announcement 0 r. lotz BLACK EUROPE: Forthcoming from Bear Family Records in February 2013 is a lavishly illustrated book in 2 volumes, documenting the sounds and images of musicians and entertainers of African descent who worked in Europe before 1927, from minstrel shows to ethnological documentation, from the earliest ragtime to the emerging syncopated popular music styles and jazz. The LP-sized books (12”x12”), written by researchers Horst Bergmeier, Jeffrey Green, Rainer Lotz, and Howard Rye, will be in a slip case accompanied by 40 CDs including every recoverable recording from the era, commercial or academic, restored by sound-engineer Christian Zwarg. The CDs will include the complete output of the African-American string bands which recorded in London in 1916 to 1922, a unique documentation, recordings of authentic minstrelsy and vaudevillian and pioneer blues harp player Pete Hampton, and the earliest recorded examples of stride piano and rhythm scat singing. From the 20s come important records of the earliest jazz including the complete works of Vorzanger’s Band in London and Mitchell’s Jazz Kings in Paris.   From Africans come recordings of African languages and folk and religious music including the recordings of Rev. J.J. Ransome Kuti, Fela Kuti’s grandfather. Some of the languages and ethnicities represented are among the earliest recorded and include Agni, Aka, Amharic, Anglo, Antankarana, Antanoussi, Anyin, Arabic, Baluba, Bambara, Banguana, Banoko, Bariba, Baule, Bavili, Bavumbu, Bayaka, Bekok, Berber, Betsileo, Bobo, Bornu, Creole from Guadeloupe and Guayane, Cuambi, Duala, Emyrne, Ewe, Ful, Geez, Haussa, Hlubi, Hova, Ibo, Jaounde, Kabinda, Kanuri, Kikuyu, Kimbundu, Kwa , Loango, Luganda, Luo, Mabea, Mahafali, Tuléar, Malagasy, Malimba, Malinka, Mandara, Mandingue, Mosi,  Mwali, Ndzwani, Ngazidja, Nourrima, Peul, Pulaar, Zarma, Sakalave, Samogo, Sara-Kaba, Sechuana,, Serère, Sianak, Si-Xosa, Soso, Suahili, Tchi, Toucouleur, Tshivenda, Vaknakaracha, Wolof, Yaounde, Yoruba, Zulu,   Interest can be registered now at no cost for news, updates and subscription details by e-mail to stating "I want to be kept informed of the BLACK EUROPE project”. Flyer and more details: www.black-europe.com
by r. lotz
Saturday, September 01, 2012
Black Europe pre-publication announcement 0 r. lotz BLACK EUROPE: Forthcoming from Bear Family Records in February 2013 is a lavishly illustrated book in 2 volumes, documenting the sounds and images of musicians and entertainers of African descent who worked in Europe before 1927, from minstrel shows to ethnological documentation, from the earliest ragtime to the emerging syncopated popular music styles and jazz. The LP-sized books (12”x12”), written by researchers Horst Bergmeier, Jeffrey Green, Rainer Lotz, and Howard Rye, will be in a slip case accompanied by 40 CDs including every recoverable recording from the era, commercial or academic, restored by sound-engineer Christian Zwarg. The CDs will include the complete output of the African-American string bands which recorded in London in 1916 to 1922, a unique documentation, recordings of authentic minstrelsy and vaudevillian and pioneer blues harp player Pete Hampton, and the earliest recorded examples of stride piano and rhythm scat singing. From the 20s come important records of the earliest jazz including the complete works of Vorzanger’s Band in London and Mitchell’s Jazz Kings in Paris.   From Africans come recordings of African languages and folk and religious music including the recordings of Rev. J.J. Ransome Kuti, Fela Kuti’s grandfather. Some of the languages and ethnicities represented are among the earliest recorded and include Agni, Aka, Amharic, Anglo, Antankarana, Antanoussi, Anyin, Arabic, Baluba, Bambara, Banguana, Banoko, Bariba, Baule, Bavili, Bavumbu, Bayaka, Bekok, Berber, Betsileo, Bobo, Bornu, Creole from Guadeloupe and Guayane, Cuambi, Duala, Emyrne, Ewe, Ful, Geez, Haussa, Hlubi, Hova, Ibo, Jaounde, Kabinda, Kanuri, Kikuyu, Kimbundu, Kwa , Loango, Luganda, Luo, Mabea, Mahafali, Tuléar, Malagasy, Malimba, Malinka, Mandara, Mandingue, Mosi,  Mwali, Ndzwani, Ngazidja, Nourrima, Peul, Pulaar, Zarma, Sakalave, Samogo, Sara-Kaba, Sechuana,, Serère, Sianak, Si-Xosa, Soso, Suahili, Tchi, Toucouleur, Tshivenda, Vaknakaracha, Wolof, Yaounde, Yoruba, Zulu,   Interest can be registered now at no cost for news, updates and subscription details by e-mail to stating "I want to be kept informed of the BLACK EUROPE project”. Flyer and more details: www.black-europe.com
by r. lotz
Saturday, September 01, 2012
The New PhD Program in American Studies at UNC 0 L. Cashman The Department of American Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill proudly announces a new doctoral program in American Studies, which joins the long-standing M.A. program in Folklore. In addition to a core strength in American cultural history and literature, our department features signature strengths in American Indian Studies, Southern Studies, International and Comparative American Studies, Folklore, and Digital Humanities. Our sixteen faculty members teach and work in an array of fields including American intellectual, social, and cultural history, foodways, material culture, popular and folk music, literary and film criticism, American religions, American Indian expressive culture, art and visual culture, vernacular architecture, popular culture, new media and public engagement, and culturally informed public policy. Our graduate programs are designed for depth and breadth in American Studies and Folklore - and they competitively position our graduates for careers in a rapidly changing world of scholarly opportunities. Our emphasis is on the centrality of the interdisciplinary humanities for all aspects of intellectual and professional life. UNC's American Studies graduate program is described in detail on our website, http://amerstud.unc.edu/programs/graduate-program Applications are being accepted for fall 2013. Please address questions to Professor Bernard Herman, Chair, blherman@email.unc.edu<mailto:blherman@email.unc.edu>, or to co-Directors of Graduate Studies Patricia Sawin, sawin@unc.edu<mailto:sawin@unc.edu>, and Joy Kasson, jskasson@email.unc.edu<mailto:jskasson@email.unc.edu>.
by L. Cashman
Friday, August 31, 2012
August Intangible Cultural Heritage Update for Newfoundland and Labrador 0 L. Cashman The ICH Update for AugustIn this month's edition of the Intangible Cultural Heritage Update for Newfoundland and Labrador, we present a review of the ICH workshop held in North West River, Labrador; our summer intern Joelle Carey reviews the Make and Break Festival in Bonavista; and Nicole Penney discusses the sewing of pillow tops by men working in the lumber woods, and how it served as a means of group socialization. Download the update in PDF format. http://archive.org/download/IchUpdate036-August2012/ichupdate036.pdf Occasional Papers in Intangible Cultural Heritage In order to let you know a bit more about what we are working on, and to share some of the ideas we are developing around the safeguarding and best practices for intangible cultural heritage (ICH), I've started an occasional papers publication. So far, we have two short papers, which deal with the project-based training model we are developing for ICH projects. Thanks to Graham Blair for the design work, and to Nicole Penney and Joelle Carey, our ICH interns, for proof-reading. No. 001 - July 2012 - Project- Based Training Initiatives: A Model for the Safeguarding of Intangible Cultural Heritage http://www.mun.ca/ich/Occasional_Paper_01.pdf No 002 - August 2012 - Old Time Concerts on the Baccalieu Trail: A Project-Based Training Case Study http://www.mun.ca/ich/Occasional_Paper_02.pdf
by L. Cashman
Friday, August 31, 2012
Audio Documentary of Tropical Storm Irene from Vermont Folklife Center 0 L. Cashman The Vermont Folklife Center announces the completion of "Weathering the Storm,” a new audio documentary that explores the impact of Tropical Storm Irene on hard hit communities throughout the state. "Weathering the Storm” features the voices of 40 Vermonters from twelve towns, addressing the experience of the storm and the continuing process of recovery. On August 28, 2011 Tropical Storm Irene hit the state of Vermont. Following the devastation caused by the storm and the resultant flooding, the Vermont Folklife Center worked to develop a response to the storm that would both address the needs of community members and create a record of their experiences for posterity. In September 2011 the Vermont Folklife Center initiated the Irene Storytelling Project: (http://www.vermontfolklifecenter.org/irene/). "Weathering the Storm” emerged from one part of the Irene Storytelling Project--a series of community organized, collective storytelling events called Story Circles (http://www.vermontfolklifecenter.org/irene/updates/storycircles/). Story Circles provide opportunities for community members to explore together their experiences of the storm, the damage it wrought, and the ongoing path to recovery. "Weathering the Storm” draws on the content and structure of Story Circles from around the state of Vermont with the goal of representing the Story Circle model in documentary format. "Weathering the Storm” follows the flow of an actual Story Circle, highlighting the gripping personal accounts of participants and providing insight into the shared responses to the storm and the common experiences of those who worked to recover from it. "A Story Circle brings a community together so that they can remember together,” says "Weathering the Storm” producer, Aylie Baker. "Story Circles foster the creation of a shared story, one made up of many different strands and perspectives knit together to form a complex whole—a collective, multifaceted memory of dramatic events.” "Weathering the Storm” was produced by Vermont Folklife Center 2011-2012 Fellow, Aylie Baker. Music provided by Jake Wildwood. The program was mastered by David Cooper. Weathering the Storm can be streamed online at http://www.vermontfolklifecenter.org. Radio stations and online broadcasters can license the piece for broadcast from PRX.org at http://www.prx.org/pieces/83876-weathering-the-storm. Support for the Irene Storytelling Project has been provided by Green Mountain Coffee, The Jack and Dorothy Byrne Foundation, Lyman Orton & Janice Izzi, Robert Fleming and Jane Howe Patrick Foundation, Vermont Community Foundation, Vermont Humanities Council, and anonymous donors. For additional information on Weathering the Storm and the Irene Storytelling Project, please contact Greg Sharrow (gsharrow@vermontfolklifecenter.org) or Aylie Baker (abaker@vermontfolklifecenter.org).
by L. Cashman
Friday, August 31, 2012


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