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Calandra Institute's "Reimagining White Ethnicity" Conference Now Online 0 R. Vanscoyoc The video recordings of the Calandra Institute's April 2012 conference "Reimagining White Ethnicity" are now archived online at: http://www.livestream.com/italicsconference2. Once you click on the above link, you need to make a selection the "Latest Videos" menu.
by R. Vanscoyoc
Wednesday, May 30, 2012
The Book of Wassail now in Kindle Edition-Largest work on Wassail customs 0 C. Bladey Greetings!Due to the high cost of shipping and publication I have decided to put the most thorough work on Wassail customs online via a Kindle EditionThe Book Of WassailFive Volumes four  are around 3-400 pages.Lots of Music, primary folklore sources recipes and loads of illustrations.You can order the perfect bound set on line herehttp://mysite.verizon.net/cbladey/wassailbook/wassailbook.htmlThere you will find complete table of contents.The kindle edition can be found here:http://www.amazon.com/The-Book-Wassail-Implementation-ebook/dp/B007WBXS1S/ref=sr_1_4?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1337101597&sr=1-4This is volume I for the other four search kindle undeer the Book of WassailEnjoy! Conrad
by C. Bladey
Tuesday, May 15, 2012
New Book-Analysis of the Folk Music of the NE of UK Newcastle Eccentrics 0 C. Bladey Greetings! I would like to announce the publication of a new work on the Folk Music of the North East of the UK. Eccentrics and the Folk Music of Newcastle Upon Tyne  It was commissioned by the Blaydon Races 150th group from Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.It will soon be published there and available via mail order from USA in July.It is available on kindle for a very low introductory price.http://www.amazon.com/Eccentrics-Folk-Music-Newcastle-ebook/dp/B007Q4TFMM/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1337100792&sr=1-1Stop in and Take A Leuk! Conrad Bladey
by C. Bladey
Tuesday, May 15, 2012
New Book: Hopkin, David. Voices of the People in Nineteenth-Century France 0 L. Cashman From Cambridge University Press:Voices of the People in Nineteenth-Century France, by David HopkinPublication Date: April 2012This innovative study of the lives of ordinary people – peasants, fishermen, textile workers – in nineteenth-century France demonstrates how folklore collections can be used to shed new light on the socially marginalized. David Hopkin explores the ways in which people used traditional genres such as stories, songs and riddles to highlight problems in their daily lives and give vent to their desires without undermining the two key institutions of their social world – the family and the community. The book addresses recognized problems in social history such as the division of power within the peasant family, the maintenance of communal bonds in competitive environments, and marriage strategies in unequal societies, showing how social and cultural history can be reconnected through the study of individual voices recorded by folklorists. Above all, it reveals how oral culture provided mechanisms for the poor to assert some control over their own destinies.• Explains how historians can approach folkloric material as historical sources • Shows how the voices of individual peasants, usually condemned to historical silence, can be preserved in oral history • Each chapter is a microstudy showing how a particular problem in social history can be clarified through the study of folklore collectionsFor more information, see http://www.cambridge.org/gb/knowledge/isbn/item6671088/?site_locale=en_GB
by L. Cashman
Friday, May 04, 2012
Folklorists in the South Retreat recap in Boiled Down Juice 0 L. Cashman See Meredith Martin-Moats' Boiled Down Juice blog for a recap of the terrific Folklorists in the South Retreat, sponsored by South Arts and Mid-America Arts Alliance: http://boileddownjuice.com/folklorists-in-the-south-retreat/#.T6PTcI7lHV0
by L. Cashman
Friday, May 04, 2012
SouthArts compiles baseline data for the creative industries of the South 0 L. Cashman From "Introducing South Arts Research" at http://www.southarts.org/site/c.guIYLaMRJxE/b.6459221/k.D05B/Research.htm Creative Industries in the South: A Research Report...establishes baseline data for the region's creative industries. South Arts has worked for the past year to conduct the research and write the 250-page report which looks at the establishments, employment, wages, and revenues for the combined for-profit and non-profit creative industries in the nine-state region served by South Arts - Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. The study also takes a separate look at the nonprofit arts, culture, and humanities organizations as a segment of the creative industries. Included in the 250-page report is a major section which focuses on the region as a whole, looking at numbers in aggregate and comparing data from states in the region. The report also includes a creative industries profile for each of the nine states served by South Arts. In addition to the full report, South Arts has created an executive summary, as well as a two-page summary for each state's creative industries profile. The purpose of the creative industries research is to provide baseline data on the scale, scope, and nature of a major segment of the creative economy. The research results will be shared with state arts agencies, arts advocates, policymakers, and economic developers to draw attention to the significant creative economy of the South.See http://www.southarts.org/site/c.guIYLaMRJxE/b.6470585/k.BBE8/Creative_Economies.htm for links to the full report, profiles and summaries by state, and a webinar.
by L. Cashman
Wednesday, May 02, 2012
Tradition: Tennessee Lives and Legacies 0 L. Cashman A collaboration between Robert Cogswell, Tennessee Arts Commission Folklife Program Director, and Nashville photographer Dean Dixon, Tradition: Tennessee Lives and Legacies portrays its subjects through extensive color portraiture along with short essays summarizing their lives and art forms. Though most of the subjects are individuals, some are two or three people who partner in keeping their legacy alive. Their traditions include musical arts, crafts, and related expressive practices and customs. The project’s wide scope reflects grassroots diversity, creativity, and vitality found across the state. Its people, though all unique, share common attachments to their cultural identities and lifelong dedication in what they do. The subjects include Charlie Acuff (fiddler from Alcoa), Robert Belfour (African American bluesman from Memphis), Minnie Bell (Choctaw basketmaker, beadworker and cook from Henning), Bill & Janice Birchfield (old-time musicians from Roan Mountain), Mildred Carathers (quilter from Nashville), McDonald Craig (African American country singer from Linden), Clyde Davenport (old-time musician from Jamestown), Celia Garduño (Mexican needleworker from Chattanooga), Mark Guenther (sorghum maker from the Mennonite community in Muddy Pond), Roy Harper (old-time singer from Manchester), Delmer Holland (fiddler from Waverly), Jean Horner (instrument maker from Westel), Bob Kounlavong (Lao musician from Nashville), Jack Martin (broom maker from Selmer), Thomas Maupin (buckdancer from Murfreesboro), Willie McLerran (basketmaker from Celina), Newberry & Sons (chairmakers from Red Boiling Springs), Polly Page (woodcarver from Pleasant Hill), John Phillips (African American gospel singer from Nashville), Mary Jane Prater (basketmaker from Cannon County), Eda Rodríguez (Salvadoran cook from Chattanooga), Roger Smith (African American peach seed carver from Culleoka), Rick & Renée Stewart (cooper and woodcarver from Hancock County), Junior B. & Malcom Strong (marble makers and players from Moss), and Billy Tripp (metal sculptor from Brownsville). The hardbound volume is large-format, containing 164 pages, with dust jacket and digital image DVD. Copies are available for online purchase from the Web site of Tennesseans for the Arts. See http://www.tn.gov/arts/tradition.htm for more information about the companion touring exhibit and teacher's guide.
by L. Cashman
Wednesday, May 02, 2012
Download updated "Handbook for Tennessee Folk Artists" 0 L. Cashman From the Tennessee Arts Commission Folklife Program:The third edition of the Program's "Handbook for Tennessee Folk Artists," by Patricia Atkinson Wells provides business, legal, and practical advice in plain language for traditional artists. The most recent version, more thoroughly described and downloadable at http://www.tn.gov/arts/folklife_publications.htm, includes links to online resources and is fully web-interactive.
by L. Cashman
Wednesday, May 02, 2012
Iowa Roots: Online collection of radio documentaries and transcripts 0 L. Cashman Iowa Roots features stories, music and talk with traditional artists from a variety of ethnic, geographic, occupational and religious groups found in Iowa.  Topics range from Meskwaki stories, Norwegian foods, Bosnian coffee, and African American Blues to Danish smørrebrød, Vietnamese Tet, Amana wines, and Mexican ballads. Iowa Roots is a creation of the Iowa Arts Council and Iowa Public Radio.
by L. Cashman
Wednesday, May 02, 2012
Tennessee Folklore Sampler 0 L. Cashman The Tennessee Folklore Society is pleased to announce the publication of A Tennessee Folklore Sampler: Selected Readings from the Tennessee Folklore Society Bulletin.  Edited by Ted Olson and Anthony P. Cavender, A Tennessee Folklore Sampler is a rich selection of the work published over the course of TFSB's 75-year history. It includes articles by some prominent students of folklore, among them Charles Wolfe, Charles Faulkner Bryan, Thomas Burton, Donald Davidson, Herbert Halpert, Mildred Haun, Michael Lofaro, Michael Montgomery, and Tom Rankin. The book is divided into ten parts covering material culture, medicine, beliefs and practices, customs, play and recreation lore, speech, legends, ballad and song, instrumental traditions and music collecting, and folk communities. A Tennessee Folklore Sampler is published by the University of Tennessee Press, with all royalties from the sale of the book going to the Tennessee Folklore Society.  For more information and ordering instructions please visit the UT Press website.
by L. Cashman
Tuesday, May 01, 2012
Romani Routes: Cultural Politics and Balkan Music in Diaspora 0 R. Vanscoyoc Romani Routes: Cultural Politics and Balkan Music in Diaspora (Oxford University Press, 2012)  Over the past two decades, a steady stream of recordings, videos, feature films, festivals, and concerts has presented the music of Balkan Gypsies, or Roma, to Western audiences, who have greeted them with exceptional enthusiasm. Yet, as author Carol Silverman notes, "Roma are revered as musicians and reviled as people." In this book, Silverman introduces readers to the people and cultures who produce this music, offering a sensitive and incisive analysis of how Romani musicians address the challenges of discrimination. Focusing on southeastern Europe then moving to the diaspora, her book examines the music within Gypsy communities, the lives and careers of outstanding musicians, and the marketing of music in the electronic media and "world music" concert circuit. Silverman touches on the way that the Roma exemplify many qualities—adaptability, cultural hybridity, transnationalism—that are taken to characterize late modern experience. Rather than just celebrating these qualities, she presents the musicians as complicated, pragmatic individuals who work creatively within the many constraints that inform their lives. As both a performer and presenter on the world music circuit, Silverman has worked extensively with Romani communities for more than two decades both in their home countries and in the diaspora. At a time when the political and economic plight of European Roma and the popularity of their music are objects of international attention, Silverman's book is incredibly timely.The book has a website with numerous photographs, audio clips, text supplements, song words, and over 100 video clips.$55.00, Hardback,  ISBN13: 9780195300949, ISBN10: 0195300947Use this 20% discount code when you order from Oxford: 28862http://www.us.oup.com/us/catalog/general/subject/Music/WorldMusicEthnomusicology/?view=usa&ci=9780195300949
by R. Vanscoyoc
Tuesday, May 01, 2012
Online collection of radio documentaries about folk music, by Rachel Hopkin 0 L. Cashman Folklorist and radio producer Rachel Hopkin's audio gallery includes samples of her work on folk music, including many that have aired on BBC Radio. The collection includes audio portraits of "Musical Migrants," like Kentucky fiddle music expert Bruce Greene, who have relocated for the love of a genre of music, a documentary on Chamamé, a folk music genre from Argentina, and a short feature on women Appalachian ballad singers. See http://rachelhopkin.com/audiogallery
by L. Cashman
Tuesday, May 01, 2012
Hunter Library Releases "Stories of Mountain Folk" All-Sound Collection 0 R. Vanscoyoc Hunter Library at Western Carolina University is releasing Stories of Mountain Folk, a new digital collection. Stories of Mountain Folk is an all-sound oral history collection produced by Catch the Spirit of Appalachia, a western North Carolina not-for-profit. The archived files were created from a series of radio interviews that aired weekly on a local radio station. Over 150 half-hour radio programs capture "local memory” detailing traditions, events, and life stories of mountain people. A wide range of interviewees include down-home gardeners, herbalists, and farmers, as well as musicians, artists, local writers, and more. The collection can be accessed from www.wcu.edu/library/DigitalCollections/StoriesofMountainFolk/.Hunter Library is committed to building regionally oriented, historically significant collections of broad cultural and research interest. Since 2005, the library has uploaded collections on Horace Kephart, Civil War letters, regional crafts, Cherokee traditions, and travel in western North Carolina. These online resources—photographs, documents, objects, and interpretive material—provide a foundation for research, education, and humanities programming through their documentation of significant aspects of the American story. Stories of Mountain Folk is the library’s first sound collection. To access Hunter Library’s Digital Collections, see www.wcu.edu/library/DigitalCollections/.
by R. Vanscoyoc
Tuesday, May 01, 2012
Survey of needs of small museums released by MAAA 0 L. Cashman Mid-America Arts Alliance gathered data over several years and several states, using surveys, site visits and interviews, from more than 800 small museums to uncover their principal needs and improvement preferences; the results of this research project are available at www.maaa.org/hiddenassets.From Hidden Assets; Research on Small Museums: Recognizing the vibrant role of museums in our society, Mid-America Arts Alliance, a regional arts organization supporting arts and culture in the six states of Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, Oklahoma, and Texas, conducted a first-ever, comprehensive study of museum training needs and demographics across our region. This research confirms what was already suspected: small and rural museums face daunting challenges in fulfilling their public promises to preserve and educate, but without training in basic organizational survival, their collections and educational purposes are at risk.   This report features some of the highlights of our longterm study (complete, state-specific studies can be found online at www.maaa.org). Mid-America Arts Alliance thanks the Institute of Museum and Library Services, our state arts agencies, and foundations that made this study possible. It is through their generous support, assistance and encouragement that this research now brings to light the most acute needs facing small museums, our nation’s "hidden assets.” An overview of the research in the region, with links to a downloadable condensed report (Hidden Assets: Research on Small Museums (brochure download), as well as to the complete report, may be found at  http://www.maaa.org/SiteResources/Data/Templates/t7.asp?docid=683&DocName=Research%20in%20the%20Region
by L. Cashman
Wednesday, April 25, 2012
Dartmouth Jewish Sound Archive offers online access to researchers 0 L. Cashman From the Dartmouth Jewish Sound Archive website at http://djsa.dartmouth.edu/index.php:The Dartmouth Jewish Sound Archive was established in 2002 as a repository of sound recordings for researchers and students. Please note, it is not a free music download site. If you are not a student at Dartmouth College or at Hebrew College, you will need to register and demonstrate a legitimate scholarly or research purpose. User accounts are good for 6 months and can be renewed if needed. In our site you will find:Web-based access to Jewish recordings that are not commercially available.Related, searchable information that can aid in the study of Jewish music and culture, Jewish society, and the history of Jewish recordings.You will find here a rich array of recordings, some of them rare, dating back as far as 1904. Our database includes sound files, graphics of record covers and labels, and details of the recordings and their contents.Among the materials that you can browse and search are:Jewish humor in many languagesYiddish folk songsYiddish theaterLadino songsIsraeli folk songsChassidic nigunimCantorial performancesReligious servicesChildren's holiday storiesClassical music by Jewish composers or performersHistorical RecordingsRadio shows and documentaries... and other material that defies classification.
by L. Cashman
Tuesday, April 24, 2012
"Indian Record Label Hits the Road to Save Traditional Music" 0 L. Cashman  "A label called Amarrass Records, founded in the Indian state of Rajasthan, is dedicated to exposing and preserving indigenous folk music before it disappears." See Michael Sullivan, "Indian Record Label Hits The Road To Save Traditional Music," The Record, NPR Music (April 14, 2012). Article with audio.
by L. Cashman
Monday, April 16, 2012
ChinaVine.org Launches New Website 0 R. Vanscoyoc ChinaVine.org, a collaborative transnational documentation and interpretation project focused on cultural heritage and arts in China, is excited to announce that they have successfully launched their redesigned web site. Integrating the interactive potential of Web 2.0 technologies and social media, the site seeks to encourage participation and feedback from scholars, artists, teachers, students, and general visitors alike. Please navigate to chinavine.org in order to explore the content, utilize materials in teaching, or participate in a number of other ways. Click on the "Join Us" button at the top of the screen to create your account, and watch the site often for new content from recent (and upcoming) field work trips!
by R. Vanscoyoc
Wednesday, April 11, 2012
"Art and Democracy: The NEA, Kickstarter, and Creativity in America" 0 R. Vanscoyoc Click here to read this article by David Ian Moss, which discusses the direction of arts funding and policy in the US.
by R. Vanscoyoc
Wednesday, April 11, 2012
New Publication Announced: A Companion to Folklore 0 R. Vanscoyoc A Companion to Folklore. Edited by Regina F. Bendix and Galit Hasan-Rokem.Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2012. A Companion to Folklore contains an original and comprehensive set of essays from international experts in the field of folklore studies. This state-of-the-art collection uniquely displays the vitality of folklore research across the globe. The Companion covers four main areas: the first section engages with the practices and theoretical approaches developed to understand the phenomena of folklore; the second discusses the distinctive shapes that folklore studies have taken in different locations in time and space; the third examines the interaction of folklore with various media, as well as folklore’s commodification. In the final section on practice, essays offer insights into how folklorists work, what they do, and ways in which they have institutionalized their field. Throughout, contributors investigate the interplay of folklore and folkloristics in both academic and political arenas; they evaluate key issues in the folk life of communities from around the world, including China, post-communist Russia, post-colonial India, South America, Israel and Japan. The result is a unique reflection and understanding of the profoundly different research histories and current perspectives on international research in the field. For preview, table of contents, and order Information: http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-1405194995.html
by R. Vanscoyoc
Friday, April 06, 2012
Music History Project on the West Virginia Mine Wars 0 S. Lynch-Thomason Blair Pathways is a music history project created to produce a CD that tells the story of the West Virginia mine wars for present generations. The West Virginia mine wars (1900-1921) were some of the largest and most ferocious battles fought for union rights and dignified conditions in U.S. labor history. These wars culminated in a 10,000 person march and battle on Blair Mountain, West Virginia in 1921. Now, just past the 90th anniversary of the Battle, Blair Mountain is in danger of mountain-top removal mining by Arch and Alpha Coal. Last summer I participated in a week-long march on Blair to bring attention to its endangerment and came to feel this was a critical moment to tell West Virginia's story through music. Blair Pathway's music is sourced from the United Mine Workers Journal, coal field balladeers and workers, regional hymn books and other radical newspapers of the time. We aim to reflect the incredible diversity of the people who mined West Virginia as we tell this critical story of labor struggle. The topics and stories in these songs and instrumentals will coalesce to illustrate the themes of the West Virginia Mine Wars. Contemporary musicians are in the process of recording these songs for the CD, which will be accompanied by a map and a written narrative to help the listener through this musical journey. In addition, educators and students will have access to lesson plans via several websites in order to further explore this challenging and incredible part of American history.The project is still in need of funds to finish recording and publishing. Please consider donating some amount (small or large) for this effort.You can view the Kickstarter page and Video by going to Kickstarter.com and searching for "Blair Pathways"Our website has music archives, blog posts and more: www.blairpathways.com
by S. Lynch-Thomason
Wednesday, April 04, 2012


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American Folklore Society
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