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The New Yorker: "Once Upon a Time: The Lure of the Fairy Tale" 0 S. Bronner The New Yorker has taken notice of folklore, even mentioning the Journal of American Folklore as an outlet for this kind of study.http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics/books/2012/07/23/120723crbo_books_acocella
by S. Bronner
Monday, July 23, 2012
Prison Folklore Project: Humor in Prisons 0 L. Cashman Dear Prisoner Advocacy, Folklore, and Literary Groups,I am launching a folklore project about humor from the prison population, www.prisonfolk.com, and your support is needed. The project will collect, edit, and publish, on the web and in other media, a collection of oral histories and writings, including jokes, anecdotes, stories, tall tales, and other forms of humor from the criminal justice population in the United States. The goal is to help humanize civil society's relationship to the incarcerated and, in the process, to raise awareness about the many criminal justice issues affecting our society. Any and all proceeds resulting from this project will be donated to support a nonprofit and secular prisoner advocacy effort of some kind.I cannot think of a better campaign to humanize the relationship between the incarcerated and civilian populations in our country. Ethically speaking, it would also take the measure of our society. (How much does it weigh? Heavy. Earlier this week I participated in a letter writing event for prisoners. I wrote three letters, sharing anecdotes with the prisoners in each, and thought, really the best thing would be to reverse the communication, from the prison to the public, and make the material widely available.)In theory this would be carried out with the support of a coalition of prisoner advocacy, legal, folklore, literary, and other organizations.Please share this e-mail and the link to the website as widely as possible. At the moment the plan is to simply begin building relationships between interested parties, while giving people an idea of the project's aim and feasibility. With the Internet, sharing and publishing all forms of media is the simplest thing.Even a small volume of humor writing from prisoners, or a handful of videos of prisoners telling anecdotes, would make a meaningful contribution to the criminal justice discourse in this country.Sincerely,Alejandro Ventura2724 St. Paul St.Baltimore, MD 21218(202) 436 9803
by L. Cashman
Monday, July 16, 2012
Qualia Encyclopedia of Gay Folklife: all the way to M 1 L. Cashman Congratulations, Qualia Folk!  I browsed a couple of articles today and am mightily impressed.  I could easily browse all day.... Note that the direct link from the AFSNet forum entry does not work for some reason, but if you simply type http://www.qualiafolk.com/ into your browser it does work.  Cheers,Moira
by M. Marsh
Monday, July 09, 2012
Sutton-Smith's "The Folkstories of Children" to be Released in Paperback 0 R. Vanscoyoc What prompts children to tell stories? What does the word "story" mean to a child at two or five years of age? The Folkstories of Children, first published in 1981, features nearly five hundred stories that were volunteered by fifty children between the ages of two and ten and transcribed word for word. The stories are organized chronologically by the age of the teller, revealing the progression of verbal competence and the gradual emergence of staging and plot organization. Many stories told by two-year-olds, for example, have only beginnings with no middle or end; the "narrative" is held together by rhyme or alliteration. After the age of three or four, the same children tell stories that feature a central character and a narrative arc. The stories also exhibit each child's growing awareness and management of his or her environment and life concerns. Some children see their stories as dialogues between teller and audience, others as monologues expressing concerns about fate and the forces of good and evil.Brian Sutton-Smith discusses the possible origins of the stories themselves: folktales, parent and teacher reading, media, required writing of stories in school, dreams, and play. The notes to each chapter draw on this context as well as folktale analysis and child development theory to consider why and how the stories take their particular forms. The Folkstories of Children provides valuable evidence and insight into the ways children actively and inventively engage language as they grow.Brian Sutton-Smith, Professor of Education, Emeritus, at the University of Pennsylvania, is the author of some fifty books and hundreds of journal articles. In 1995 he received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Folklore Society. Please visit the Penn Press website for book excerpts and ordering information.
by R. Vanscoyoc
Monday, July 09, 2012
Audio Interview with Andy Statman, 2012 National Heritage Fellow 0 L. Cashman A pod-cast feature on 2012 NEA National Heritage Fellow Andy Statman is now posted on the NEA web-site:Andy StatmanKlezmer Clarinetist, Mandolin-player, Composer, 2012 National Heritage Fellow In the first of two-part interview, musical wonder Andy Statman talks about his early musical career, including the importance of bluegrass for a boy born in Brooklyn. http://www.arts.gov/podweb/podCMS/podlist.php
by L. Cashman
Monday, June 25, 2012
"The Beautiful Music All Around Us" by Stephen Wade 0 R. Vanscoyoc This fall, the University of Illinois Press will release Stephen Wade's new book, The Beautiful Music All Around Us: Field Recordings and the American Experience. To watch an interview in which Stephen discusses the book, click here. To visit the Press's website, please click here.
by R. Vanscoyoc
Tuesday, June 19, 2012
MSU Museum Launches "Great Folks" Blog on Michigan Traditional Arts 0 R. Vanscoyoc Michigan State University Museum has launched "GREAT FOLKS!" - a new blog dedicated to expanding the community of tradition bearers and those who want to learn more about the music, stories, dance, foodways, art, and cultural heritage of Michigan and beyond. A team of bloggers - including Bob Blackman, Pat Power, Lora Helou, Beth Donaldson, Kurt Dewhurst, and myself - are committed to sharing news and information about:* Great Lakes Folk Festival* Quilt Index* Michigan Barn and Farmstead Survey* Michigan Stained Glass Census* Michigan Quilt Project* Michigan Heritage Awards* Michigan Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Program* Michigan traditional artists* other traditional arts activities and resources of the MSU Museum and other organizations around the state* and occasional reports on the work of our colleagues at the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage, the American Folklore Society, the American Folklife Center, and public sector folklore programs across the U.S..The blog is sponsored by the Michigan State University Museum's Michigan Traditional Arts Program, a partnership with the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs.Go to http://gr8tfolks.blogspot.com/ and then sign up to follow us by email and/or to post comments.Then, please send this email message to your circle of friends who also are interested in this important part of our country's expressive cultural heritage!
by R. Vanscoyoc
Monday, June 18, 2012
Washington Post Article on Singing and Praying Bands 0 R. Vanscoyoc This Washington Post article on singing and praying bands reflects on the "ethical tightrope walk of supporting fragile traditions by sharing them with the greater public" in discussing the relationship between folklorists/ethnomusicologist Clifford Murphy and the singing and praying bands with whom he works. To read the full piece, please click on the following link: http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/singing-and-praying-bands-take-musical-ministry-to-the-masses/2012/06/14/gJQAOHwddV_story.html.
by R. Vanscoyoc
Monday, June 18, 2012
Traditional Arts Indiana Webinar Recording: Social Neworking for Artists.. 0 R. Vanscoyoc On April 5th, 2012, Traditional Arts Indiana held a webinar about "Social Networking for Artists and Performers." The webinar is now available as a video recording at http://www.traditionalartsindiana.org/?p=3428. TIA will be holding another webinar on "Wordpress for Traditional Musicians and Folk Artists" at 4PM on Thursday, June 14th, 2012. To participate in the webinar, please visit the TIA website by clicking here.
by R. Vanscoyoc
Thursday, June 14, 2012
NY TImes Recognizes Folklore Connection in "Beasts of the Southern Wild" 0 R. Vanscoyoc To read the New York Times' piece about director Benh Zeitlin's new feature film Beasts of the Southern Wild, follow this link: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/10/movies/the-making-of-beasts-of-the-southern-wild.html?pagewanted=all.
by R. Vanscoyoc
Wednesday, June 13, 2012
National Gallery of Art Launches "Your Art" Mobile App 0 R. Vanscoyoc The National Gallery of Art is looking for feedback on its first mobileapplication called Your Art. Your Art features audio on 130 works of art inthe Gallery¹s collection as well as maps, high resolution images, and eventsand exhibition listings.We are seeking individuals who would be willing to come to the Gallery totry out the app and participate in an interview conducted by a Gallery staffmember. You do not have to be a regular museum visitor to participate or aregular user of app technologies. In fact, we are interested in talking withpeople with varying experience with art and technology.Here¹s a little more about the interview:--When? The interview will be conducted in June and July at a mutuallyagreeable time.--Where? The interview will be conducted in the West Building of theNational Gallery of Art.--How long? The interview will take approximately an hour and a half fromthe time you walk in the building to when you depart.--What? The interview consist of two parts: 1) trying out the app in thegalleries in front of actual works of art with a Gallery staff memberobserving, and 2) an interview based on your experience using the app.--Thanks! In appreciation for your time, the Gallery will give you a giftcertificate for the Gallery¹s Garden Café Catalonia. Inspired by theexhibition Joan Miró: The Ladder of Escape, award-winning Washington-basedChef Jose Andres, executive chef of Jaleo, has created a menu of signatureCatalan dishes incorporating traditional ingredients.Your feedback will be reported anonymously with that of other participantsand will provide the Gallery with valuable information to help us improvethe Your Art app and future mobile initiatives.If you are interested in participating, please contact Alexandra Morrison byemail at a-morrison@nga.gov or by phone 202-842-6320. Alexandra will giveyou more specific details about the evaluation. Please get in touch with herby Friday, June 15.
by R. Vanscoyoc
Monday, June 11, 2012
New Publication: Shaping Virtual Lives 0 R. Vanscoyoc New Publication: Shaping Virtual Lives
by R. Vanscoyoc
Monday, June 11, 2012
Joe Magarac Statue in Pittsburgh, PA 0 R. Vanscoyoc J. Michael Krivyanski wrote the following piece about the legendary steel mill hero Joe Magarac. The article includes photos of the Joe Magarac statue at the United Steel Workers Headquarters in Pittsburgh, PA.
by R. Vanscoyoc
Monday, June 11, 2012
New Release: Antipodean Traditions: Australian Folklore in the 21st Century 0 R. Vanscoyoc Antipodean Traditions: Australian Folklore in the 21st Century provides an overview of current folklore studies in Australia. It will be of interest to folklorists and scholars in related fields, not only for an insight into the rich diversity of Australian folk traditions but also as a comparative text for research and teaching. Please visit the website of Black Swan Press at Curtin University to read more and to find out how to order the book.
by R. Vanscoyoc
Friday, June 08, 2012
Calandra Institute's "Reimagining White Ethnicity" Conference Now Online 0 R. Vanscoyoc The video recordings of the Calandra Institute's April 2012 conference "Reimagining White Ethnicity" are now archived online at: http://www.livestream.com/italicsconference2. Once you click on the above link, you need to make a selection the "Latest Videos" menu.
by R. Vanscoyoc
Wednesday, May 30, 2012
The Book of Wassail now in Kindle Edition-Largest work on Wassail customs 0 C. Bladey Greetings!Due to the high cost of shipping and publication I have decided to put the most thorough work on Wassail customs online via a Kindle EditionThe Book Of WassailFive Volumes four  are around 3-400 pages.Lots of Music, primary folklore sources recipes and loads of illustrations.You can order the perfect bound set on line herehttp://mysite.verizon.net/cbladey/wassailbook/wassailbook.htmlThere you will find complete table of contents.The kindle edition can be found here:http://www.amazon.com/The-Book-Wassail-Implementation-ebook/dp/B007WBXS1S/ref=sr_1_4?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1337101597&sr=1-4This is volume I for the other four search kindle undeer the Book of WassailEnjoy! Conrad
by C. Bladey
Tuesday, May 15, 2012
New Book-Analysis of the Folk Music of the NE of UK Newcastle Eccentrics 0 C. Bladey Greetings! I would like to announce the publication of a new work on the Folk Music of the North East of the UK. Eccentrics and the Folk Music of Newcastle Upon Tyne  It was commissioned by the Blaydon Races 150th group from Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.It will soon be published there and available via mail order from USA in July.It is available on kindle for a very low introductory price.http://www.amazon.com/Eccentrics-Folk-Music-Newcastle-ebook/dp/B007Q4TFMM/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1337100792&sr=1-1Stop in and Take A Leuk! Conrad Bladey
by C. Bladey
Tuesday, May 15, 2012
New Book: Hopkin, David. Voices of the People in Nineteenth-Century France 0 L. Cashman From Cambridge University Press:Voices of the People in Nineteenth-Century France, by David HopkinPublication Date: April 2012This innovative study of the lives of ordinary people – peasants, fishermen, textile workers – in nineteenth-century France demonstrates how folklore collections can be used to shed new light on the socially marginalized. David Hopkin explores the ways in which people used traditional genres such as stories, songs and riddles to highlight problems in their daily lives and give vent to their desires without undermining the two key institutions of their social world – the family and the community. The book addresses recognized problems in social history such as the division of power within the peasant family, the maintenance of communal bonds in competitive environments, and marriage strategies in unequal societies, showing how social and cultural history can be reconnected through the study of individual voices recorded by folklorists. Above all, it reveals how oral culture provided mechanisms for the poor to assert some control over their own destinies.• Explains how historians can approach folkloric material as historical sources • Shows how the voices of individual peasants, usually condemned to historical silence, can be preserved in oral history • Each chapter is a microstudy showing how a particular problem in social history can be clarified through the study of folklore collectionsFor more information, see http://www.cambridge.org/gb/knowledge/isbn/item6671088/?site_locale=en_GB
by L. Cashman
Friday, May 04, 2012
Folklorists in the South Retreat recap in Boiled Down Juice 0 L. Cashman See Meredith Martin-Moats' Boiled Down Juice blog for a recap of the terrific Folklorists in the South Retreat, sponsored by South Arts and Mid-America Arts Alliance: http://boileddownjuice.com/folklorists-in-the-south-retreat/#.T6PTcI7lHV0
by L. Cashman
Friday, May 04, 2012
SouthArts compiles baseline data for the creative industries of the South 0 L. Cashman From "Introducing South Arts Research" at http://www.southarts.org/site/c.guIYLaMRJxE/b.6459221/k.D05B/Research.htm Creative Industries in the South: A Research Report...establishes baseline data for the region's creative industries. South Arts has worked for the past year to conduct the research and write the 250-page report which looks at the establishments, employment, wages, and revenues for the combined for-profit and non-profit creative industries in the nine-state region served by South Arts - Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. The study also takes a separate look at the nonprofit arts, culture, and humanities organizations as a segment of the creative industries. Included in the 250-page report is a major section which focuses on the region as a whole, looking at numbers in aggregate and comparing data from states in the region. The report also includes a creative industries profile for each of the nine states served by South Arts. In addition to the full report, South Arts has created an executive summary, as well as a two-page summary for each state's creative industries profile. The purpose of the creative industries research is to provide baseline data on the scale, scope, and nature of a major segment of the creative economy. The research results will be shared with state arts agencies, arts advocates, policymakers, and economic developers to draw attention to the significant creative economy of the South.See http://www.southarts.org/site/c.guIYLaMRJxE/b.6470585/k.BBE8/Creative_Economies.htm for links to the full report, profiles and summaries by state, and a webinar.
by L. Cashman
Wednesday, May 02, 2012


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American Folklore Society
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