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NYTimes article on trends in ethnographic film making 0 L. Cashman Dennis Lim, "The Merger of Academia and Art House: Harvard Filmmakers’ Messy World" New York Times (8/31/2012) at http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/02/movies/harvard-filmmakers-messy-world.html?_r=1
by L. Cashman
Monday, September 17, 2012
NPR audio report on Coon Dog Cemetary in Alabama 0 L. Cashman Audio: "A Resting Place For Hunting Hounds In Alabama," by Debbie Elliiott on NPR: http://www.npr.org/2012/09/03/160119854/a-resting-place-for-hunting-hounds-in-alabama
by L. Cashman
Monday, September 17, 2012
Digital Dharma: The Art of Preservation in a Copy-Paste World 0 L. Cashman Maggie Jackson blog: Digital Dharma: The Art of Preservation in a Copy-Paste World at http://maggie-jackson.com/2012/08/08/digital-dharma-the-art-of-preservation-in-a-copy-paste-world/: on documentary, directed by Dafna Yachin, about E. Gene Smith, a scholar of Tibetan literature who worked on the preservation and reproduction of tens of thousands of rare, seminal Tibetan texts from a canon integral to the history of Buddhism.
by L. Cashman
Monday, September 17, 2012
Effects on community of the filming of "Deliverance" 0 L. Cashman http://www.marketplace.org/topics/life/40-years-later-deliverance-causes-mixed-feelings-georgia
by L. Cashman
Monday, September 17, 2012
New OSU Center for Folklore Studies Website and Facebook Page 0 C. Patterson The Center for Folklore Studies at Ohio State is excited to announce that we have a new website! Take a moment to poke around and check it out! The URL is the same: simply visit http://cfs.osu.edu/. You will be able to find all of the same information from the old site on the new one, only some of it will be either updated or stored in a new location.  Friends of CFS will find the Events page very helpful for keeping informed about the year's lectures, workshops and lunches; instructors will benefit especially from our PDFs of course syllabi; and students can learn more about the field by visiting our Folklore Resources pages and links. The Center for Folklore Studies also has a new Facebook page, which I encourage all of you to "like," share with friends, and interact with. The page is designed to keep everyone abreast of our activities as well as to create a space where we can post folklore resources, news, and events, so share away!If you would like us to add your program to our website or mention your projects on our Facebook page, email me at patterson.493@osu.edu.
by C. Patterson
Tuesday, September 04, 2012
Black Europe pre-publication announcement 0 r. lotz BLACK EUROPE: Forthcoming from Bear Family Records in February 2013 is a lavishly illustrated book in 2 volumes, documenting the sounds and images of musicians and entertainers of African descent who worked in Europe before 1927, from minstrel shows to ethnological documentation, from the earliest ragtime to the emerging syncopated popular music styles and jazz. The LP-sized books (12”x12”), written by researchers Horst Bergmeier, Jeffrey Green, Rainer Lotz, and Howard Rye, will be in a slip case accompanied by 40 CDs including every recoverable recording from the era, commercial or academic, restored by sound-engineer Christian Zwarg. The CDs will include the complete output of the African-American string bands which recorded in London in 1916 to 1922, a unique documentation, recordings of authentic minstrelsy and vaudevillian and pioneer blues harp player Pete Hampton, and the earliest recorded examples of stride piano and rhythm scat singing. From the 20s come important records of the earliest jazz including the complete works of Vorzanger’s Band in London and Mitchell’s Jazz Kings in Paris.   From Africans come recordings of African languages and folk and religious music including the recordings of Rev. J.J. Ransome Kuti, Fela Kuti’s grandfather. Some of the languages and ethnicities represented are among the earliest recorded and include Agni, Aka, Amharic, Anglo, Antankarana, Antanoussi, Anyin, Arabic, Baluba, Bambara, Banguana, Banoko, Bariba, Baule, Bavili, Bavumbu, Bayaka, Bekok, Berber, Betsileo, Bobo, Bornu, Creole from Guadeloupe and Guayane, Cuambi, Duala, Emyrne, Ewe, Ful, Geez, Haussa, Hlubi, Hova, Ibo, Jaounde, Kabinda, Kanuri, Kikuyu, Kimbundu, Kwa , Loango, Luganda, Luo, Mabea, Mahafali, Tuléar, Malagasy, Malimba, Malinka, Mandara, Mandingue, Mosi,  Mwali, Ndzwani, Ngazidja, Nourrima, Peul, Pulaar, Zarma, Sakalave, Samogo, Sara-Kaba, Sechuana,, Serère, Sianak, Si-Xosa, Soso, Suahili, Tchi, Toucouleur, Tshivenda, Vaknakaracha, Wolof, Yaounde, Yoruba, Zulu,   Interest can be registered now at no cost for news, updates and subscription details by e-mail to stating "I want to be kept informed of the BLACK EUROPE project”. Flyer and more details: www.black-europe.com
by r. lotz
Saturday, September 01, 2012
Black Europe pre-publication announcement 0 r. lotz BLACK EUROPE: Forthcoming from Bear Family Records in February 2013 is a lavishly illustrated book in 2 volumes, documenting the sounds and images of musicians and entertainers of African descent who worked in Europe before 1927, from minstrel shows to ethnological documentation, from the earliest ragtime to the emerging syncopated popular music styles and jazz. The LP-sized books (12”x12”), written by researchers Horst Bergmeier, Jeffrey Green, Rainer Lotz, and Howard Rye, will be in a slip case accompanied by 40 CDs including every recoverable recording from the era, commercial or academic, restored by sound-engineer Christian Zwarg. The CDs will include the complete output of the African-American string bands which recorded in London in 1916 to 1922, a unique documentation, recordings of authentic minstrelsy and vaudevillian and pioneer blues harp player Pete Hampton, and the earliest recorded examples of stride piano and rhythm scat singing. From the 20s come important records of the earliest jazz including the complete works of Vorzanger’s Band in London and Mitchell’s Jazz Kings in Paris.   From Africans come recordings of African languages and folk and religious music including the recordings of Rev. J.J. Ransome Kuti, Fela Kuti’s grandfather. Some of the languages and ethnicities represented are among the earliest recorded and include Agni, Aka, Amharic, Anglo, Antankarana, Antanoussi, Anyin, Arabic, Baluba, Bambara, Banguana, Banoko, Bariba, Baule, Bavili, Bavumbu, Bayaka, Bekok, Berber, Betsileo, Bobo, Bornu, Creole from Guadeloupe and Guayane, Cuambi, Duala, Emyrne, Ewe, Ful, Geez, Haussa, Hlubi, Hova, Ibo, Jaounde, Kabinda, Kanuri, Kikuyu, Kimbundu, Kwa , Loango, Luganda, Luo, Mabea, Mahafali, Tuléar, Malagasy, Malimba, Malinka, Mandara, Mandingue, Mosi,  Mwali, Ndzwani, Ngazidja, Nourrima, Peul, Pulaar, Zarma, Sakalave, Samogo, Sara-Kaba, Sechuana,, Serère, Sianak, Si-Xosa, Soso, Suahili, Tchi, Toucouleur, Tshivenda, Vaknakaracha, Wolof, Yaounde, Yoruba, Zulu,   Interest can be registered now at no cost for news, updates and subscription details by e-mail to stating "I want to be kept informed of the BLACK EUROPE project”. Flyer and more details: www.black-europe.com
by r. lotz
Saturday, September 01, 2012
The New PhD Program in American Studies at UNC 0 L. Cashman The Department of American Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill proudly announces a new doctoral program in American Studies, which joins the long-standing M.A. program in Folklore. In addition to a core strength in American cultural history and literature, our department features signature strengths in American Indian Studies, Southern Studies, International and Comparative American Studies, Folklore, and Digital Humanities. Our sixteen faculty members teach and work in an array of fields including American intellectual, social, and cultural history, foodways, material culture, popular and folk music, literary and film criticism, American religions, American Indian expressive culture, art and visual culture, vernacular architecture, popular culture, new media and public engagement, and culturally informed public policy. Our graduate programs are designed for depth and breadth in American Studies and Folklore - and they competitively position our graduates for careers in a rapidly changing world of scholarly opportunities. Our emphasis is on the centrality of the interdisciplinary humanities for all aspects of intellectual and professional life. UNC's American Studies graduate program is described in detail on our website, http://amerstud.unc.edu/programs/graduate-program Applications are being accepted for fall 2013. Please address questions to Professor Bernard Herman, Chair, blherman@email.unc.edu<mailto:blherman@email.unc.edu>, or to co-Directors of Graduate Studies Patricia Sawin, sawin@unc.edu<mailto:sawin@unc.edu>, and Joy Kasson, jskasson@email.unc.edu<mailto:jskasson@email.unc.edu>.
by L. Cashman
Friday, August 31, 2012
August Intangible Cultural Heritage Update for Newfoundland and Labrador 0 L. Cashman The ICH Update for AugustIn this month's edition of the Intangible Cultural Heritage Update for Newfoundland and Labrador, we present a review of the ICH workshop held in North West River, Labrador; our summer intern Joelle Carey reviews the Make and Break Festival in Bonavista; and Nicole Penney discusses the sewing of pillow tops by men working in the lumber woods, and how it served as a means of group socialization. Download the update in PDF format. http://archive.org/download/IchUpdate036-August2012/ichupdate036.pdf Occasional Papers in Intangible Cultural Heritage In order to let you know a bit more about what we are working on, and to share some of the ideas we are developing around the safeguarding and best practices for intangible cultural heritage (ICH), I've started an occasional papers publication. So far, we have two short papers, which deal with the project-based training model we are developing for ICH projects. Thanks to Graham Blair for the design work, and to Nicole Penney and Joelle Carey, our ICH interns, for proof-reading. No. 001 - July 2012 - Project- Based Training Initiatives: A Model for the Safeguarding of Intangible Cultural Heritage http://www.mun.ca/ich/Occasional_Paper_01.pdf No 002 - August 2012 - Old Time Concerts on the Baccalieu Trail: A Project-Based Training Case Study http://www.mun.ca/ich/Occasional_Paper_02.pdf
by L. Cashman
Friday, August 31, 2012
Audio Documentary of Tropical Storm Irene from Vermont Folklife Center 0 L. Cashman The Vermont Folklife Center announces the completion of "Weathering the Storm,” a new audio documentary that explores the impact of Tropical Storm Irene on hard hit communities throughout the state. "Weathering the Storm” features the voices of 40 Vermonters from twelve towns, addressing the experience of the storm and the continuing process of recovery. On August 28, 2011 Tropical Storm Irene hit the state of Vermont. Following the devastation caused by the storm and the resultant flooding, the Vermont Folklife Center worked to develop a response to the storm that would both address the needs of community members and create a record of their experiences for posterity. In September 2011 the Vermont Folklife Center initiated the Irene Storytelling Project: (http://www.vermontfolklifecenter.org/irene/). "Weathering the Storm” emerged from one part of the Irene Storytelling Project--a series of community organized, collective storytelling events called Story Circles (http://www.vermontfolklifecenter.org/irene/updates/storycircles/). Story Circles provide opportunities for community members to explore together their experiences of the storm, the damage it wrought, and the ongoing path to recovery. "Weathering the Storm” draws on the content and structure of Story Circles from around the state of Vermont with the goal of representing the Story Circle model in documentary format. "Weathering the Storm” follows the flow of an actual Story Circle, highlighting the gripping personal accounts of participants and providing insight into the shared responses to the storm and the common experiences of those who worked to recover from it. "A Story Circle brings a community together so that they can remember together,” says "Weathering the Storm” producer, Aylie Baker. "Story Circles foster the creation of a shared story, one made up of many different strands and perspectives knit together to form a complex whole—a collective, multifaceted memory of dramatic events.” "Weathering the Storm” was produced by Vermont Folklife Center 2011-2012 Fellow, Aylie Baker. Music provided by Jake Wildwood. The program was mastered by David Cooper. Weathering the Storm can be streamed online at http://www.vermontfolklifecenter.org. Radio stations and online broadcasters can license the piece for broadcast from PRX.org at http://www.prx.org/pieces/83876-weathering-the-storm. Support for the Irene Storytelling Project has been provided by Green Mountain Coffee, The Jack and Dorothy Byrne Foundation, Lyman Orton & Janice Izzi, Robert Fleming and Jane Howe Patrick Foundation, Vermont Community Foundation, Vermont Humanities Council, and anonymous donors. For additional information on Weathering the Storm and the Irene Storytelling Project, please contact Greg Sharrow (gsharrow@vermontfolklifecenter.org) or Aylie Baker (abaker@vermontfolklifecenter.org).
by L. Cashman
Friday, August 31, 2012
New fiddle and dance publication from NAFCo/Elphinstone Institute 1 I. Russell This convention is great.  I like the blending of an academic conference with the fiddle festival.  The organizers bring in excellent musicians and dancers, and I really appreciated the variety of papers and presentations at the conference.  I've attached a You-Tube clip to give an idea of some of the musical performances.  The volumes of articles from these conventions feature a wide range of scholarship on fiddling. - Gregory Hansen
by G. Hansen
Friday, August 24, 2012
New Release: Just Folklore, by Elliott Oring 0 L. Cashman Elliott Oring, Just Folklore: Analysis, Interpretation, Critique (Cantilever Press, 2012). See http://cantileverpress.com/justfolk.html
by L. Cashman
Thursday, August 23, 2012
Census Seeks Changes In How It Measures Race 0 L. Cashman Census Seeks Changes In How It Measures Raceby The Associated PressWASHINGTON August 8, 2012, 08:00 pm ET WASHINGTON (AP) - To keep pace with rapidly changing notions of race,the Census Bureau wants to make broad changes to its surveys that wouldtreat "Hispanic" as a distinct category regardless of race, end use ofthe term "Negro" and offer new ways to identify Middle Easterners. http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=158438796
by L. Cashman
Thursday, August 23, 2012
Slow Food USA Blog posts "Archive of Taste: The Appalachian Food Storybank" 0 L. Cashman *Archive of Taste: The Appalachian Food Storybank*By Deirdra Stockmann <deirdras@gmail.com>, Slow Food USA volunteer and former leader with Slow Food Huron ValleyThe hills of Southern Appalachia and the people who live there have long been shaped by their foodways – the cultural, economic and geographic paths that weave people and land together. And those green hills have listened silently as generations have passed down recipes, farming techniques and stories about growing and eating together. People, of course, have listened to these stories as well, but most of them have never been recorded, some have been lost, and countless tales and tricks of the trade reside only in the minds and memories of the region’s elders.In 2011, Slow Food Asheville created the Appalachian Food Storybank as a way to "acknowledge, honor, and archive Appalachian heritage foods and foodways in order to promote the preservation of diverse local knowledges, natural resources, and food biodiversity.” In less than two years, the program has established a committed group of volunteers, built partnerships with other organizations, and created an enthusiastic buzz among local media and area residents eager to help preserve their own local history.  For more of the article, see http://www.slowfoodusa.org/index.php/slow_food/blog_post/archive_of_taste_the_appalachian_food_storybank/
by L. Cashman
Thursday, August 23, 2012
American Sikh culture on Folkstreams.net 0 L. Cashman Folkstreams is featuring "Two Homes, One Heart" a 30 minutevideo about Sikh women and their songs and dances inSacramento, CA.  This 1992 film is by Joyce Middlebrook.  http://www.folkstreams.net/film,108"Sikhs in Northern California celebrate special events withGiddha and Bhangra, songs and dances from their nativeland, Punjab, India. The film shows women in theirworkplaces in America and in a harvest festivalperformance.  The Punjabi narrator describes the meaning ofseveral songs.  Rehearsals and performances by children andteenagers show how the dances are evolving to reflect theinfluence of contemporary cinema.  Wedding rituals, aSunday religious service, and women relating their feelingsabout living in America give a glimpse of hearts sharedbetween India and California."
by L. Cashman
Thursday, August 23, 2012
Tribe Revives Language on Verge of Extinction 0 L. Cashman Tribe Revives Language on Verge of ExtinctionBy KIRK JOHNSONNew York TimesAugust 04, 2012http://mobile.nytimes.com/2012/08/04/us/siletz-language-with-few-voices-finds-modern-way-to-survive.xmlSILETZ, Ore. - Local native languages teeter on the brink of oblivion all over the world as the biglinguistic sweepstakes winners like English, Spanish or Mandarin ride a surging wave of globalcommunications.An American Indian language with only about five speakers left - once dominant in this part ofthe West, then relegated to near extinction - has, since earlier this year, been shouting back tothe world: "Hey,we're talking here!" (In Siletz that would be naa-ch'aa-ghit-'a.)(For more info go to PORTSIDE (portside@portside.org)
by L. Cashman
Thursday, August 23, 2012
Kentucky Maps 0 L. Cashman <http://digital.library.louisville.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/maps/>http://digital.library.louisville.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/maps/The folks at the University of Louisville Libraries have created acartographic trove that will excite and delight historians, urbanologists,and geographers everywhere. This collection contains three atlases ofLouisville and environs in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, alongwith 74 additional maps from the Lafon Allen Kentucky Maps Collection. Mr.Allen was a son of Kentucky who was an inveterate map collector throughouthis life. Visitors to the site can browse all maps by date, or they can viewuseful indices for the 1876, 1884, and 1913 atlases of Louisville includedhere. Those persons seeking a bit of background material should read theastute commentary offered by Tom Owen in the About the Collection section.
by L. Cashman
Thursday, August 23, 2012
2012 Philadelphia Folk Festival streamed live online 0 L. Cashman For the first time in its 51 year history, The Philadelphia Folk Festival is being streamed live on the internet. <http://www.pfs.org/article/iradiophilly-stream-philadelphia-folk-fest-main-stage>The 2012 Philadelphia Folk Festival runs Aug 17-19 at the Old Pool Farm in Montgomery County near Schwenksville, Pa. It is produced by the Mt. Airy-based Philadelphia Folksong Society.
by L. Cashman
Monday, August 20, 2012
Boston Globe Article on Lead Poisonings Attributed to Folk Remedies 0 R. Vanscoyoc http://www.boston.com/whitecoatnotes/2012/08/02/boston-children-hospital-lead-poisoning-mystery-prompts-federal-warning-about-folk-remedies/ZuS15mRUvN9GfKmMn2vfsJ/story.html?s_campaign=8315
by R. Vanscoyoc
Friday, August 03, 2012
WV Mountain Dance Trail and Augusta Heritage Center in the NY Times 0 R. Vanscoyoc Click here to read the article.
by R. Vanscoyoc
Friday, August 03, 2012


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American Folklore Society
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