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New Release: Just Folklore, by Elliott Oring 0 L. Cashman Elliott Oring, Just Folklore: Analysis, Interpretation, Critique (Cantilever Press, 2012). See http://cantileverpress.com/justfolk.html
by L. Cashman
Thursday, August 23, 2012
Census Seeks Changes In How It Measures Race 0 L. Cashman Census Seeks Changes In How It Measures Raceby The Associated PressWASHINGTON August 8, 2012, 08:00 pm ET WASHINGTON (AP) - To keep pace with rapidly changing notions of race,the Census Bureau wants to make broad changes to its surveys that wouldtreat "Hispanic" as a distinct category regardless of race, end use ofthe term "Negro" and offer new ways to identify Middle Easterners. http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=158438796
by L. Cashman
Thursday, August 23, 2012
Slow Food USA Blog posts "Archive of Taste: The Appalachian Food Storybank" 0 L. Cashman *Archive of Taste: The Appalachian Food Storybank*By Deirdra Stockmann <deirdras@gmail.com>, Slow Food USA volunteer and former leader with Slow Food Huron ValleyThe hills of Southern Appalachia and the people who live there have long been shaped by their foodways – the cultural, economic and geographic paths that weave people and land together. And those green hills have listened silently as generations have passed down recipes, farming techniques and stories about growing and eating together. People, of course, have listened to these stories as well, but most of them have never been recorded, some have been lost, and countless tales and tricks of the trade reside only in the minds and memories of the region’s elders.In 2011, Slow Food Asheville created the Appalachian Food Storybank as a way to "acknowledge, honor, and archive Appalachian heritage foods and foodways in order to promote the preservation of diverse local knowledges, natural resources, and food biodiversity.” In less than two years, the program has established a committed group of volunteers, built partnerships with other organizations, and created an enthusiastic buzz among local media and area residents eager to help preserve their own local history.  For more of the article, see http://www.slowfoodusa.org/index.php/slow_food/blog_post/archive_of_taste_the_appalachian_food_storybank/
by L. Cashman
Thursday, August 23, 2012
American Sikh culture on Folkstreams.net 0 L. Cashman Folkstreams is featuring "Two Homes, One Heart" a 30 minutevideo about Sikh women and their songs and dances inSacramento, CA.  This 1992 film is by Joyce Middlebrook.  http://www.folkstreams.net/film,108"Sikhs in Northern California celebrate special events withGiddha and Bhangra, songs and dances from their nativeland, Punjab, India. The film shows women in theirworkplaces in America and in a harvest festivalperformance.  The Punjabi narrator describes the meaning ofseveral songs.  Rehearsals and performances by children andteenagers show how the dances are evolving to reflect theinfluence of contemporary cinema.  Wedding rituals, aSunday religious service, and women relating their feelingsabout living in America give a glimpse of hearts sharedbetween India and California."
by L. Cashman
Thursday, August 23, 2012
Tribe Revives Language on Verge of Extinction 0 L. Cashman Tribe Revives Language on Verge of ExtinctionBy KIRK JOHNSONNew York TimesAugust 04, 2012http://mobile.nytimes.com/2012/08/04/us/siletz-language-with-few-voices-finds-modern-way-to-survive.xmlSILETZ, Ore. - Local native languages teeter on the brink of oblivion all over the world as the biglinguistic sweepstakes winners like English, Spanish or Mandarin ride a surging wave of globalcommunications.An American Indian language with only about five speakers left - once dominant in this part ofthe West, then relegated to near extinction - has, since earlier this year, been shouting back tothe world: "Hey,we're talking here!" (In Siletz that would be naa-ch'aa-ghit-'a.)(For more info go to PORTSIDE (portside@portside.org)
by L. Cashman
Thursday, August 23, 2012
Kentucky Maps 0 L. Cashman <http://digital.library.louisville.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/maps/>http://digital.library.louisville.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/maps/The folks at the University of Louisville Libraries have created acartographic trove that will excite and delight historians, urbanologists,and geographers everywhere. This collection contains three atlases ofLouisville and environs in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, alongwith 74 additional maps from the Lafon Allen Kentucky Maps Collection. Mr.Allen was a son of Kentucky who was an inveterate map collector throughouthis life. Visitors to the site can browse all maps by date, or they can viewuseful indices for the 1876, 1884, and 1913 atlases of Louisville includedhere. Those persons seeking a bit of background material should read theastute commentary offered by Tom Owen in the About the Collection section.
by L. Cashman
Thursday, August 23, 2012
2012 Philadelphia Folk Festival streamed live online 0 L. Cashman For the first time in its 51 year history, The Philadelphia Folk Festival is being streamed live on the internet. <http://www.pfs.org/article/iradiophilly-stream-philadelphia-folk-fest-main-stage>The 2012 Philadelphia Folk Festival runs Aug 17-19 at the Old Pool Farm in Montgomery County near Schwenksville, Pa. It is produced by the Mt. Airy-based Philadelphia Folksong Society.
by L. Cashman
Monday, August 20, 2012
Boston Globe Article on Lead Poisonings Attributed to Folk Remedies 0 R. Vanscoyoc http://www.boston.com/whitecoatnotes/2012/08/02/boston-children-hospital-lead-poisoning-mystery-prompts-federal-warning-about-folk-remedies/ZuS15mRUvN9GfKmMn2vfsJ/story.html?s_campaign=8315
by R. Vanscoyoc
Friday, August 03, 2012
WV Mountain Dance Trail and Augusta Heritage Center in the NY Times 0 R. Vanscoyoc Click here to read the article.
by R. Vanscoyoc
Friday, August 03, 2012
Following the WI Teachers of Local Culture's Tour: The State of Superior 0 R. Olson Wisconsin Teachers of Local Culture--a partnership among the Wisconsin Arts Board, the Center for the Study of Upper Midwestern Cultures and the Chippewa Valley Museum--has just begun its 7th annual cultural tour for teachers. Twenty nine teachers and staff began this year's tour at a former CCC camp in Drummond, Wisconsin. This year our theme is "the State of Superior" and we will be visiting several Ojibwe reservations; learning more about mining, both past and possibly future; cruising in the Duluth harbor and playing a mobile game featuring the St. Louis Estuary; talking with a labor organizer; spending time with a logger in the Chequamegon National Forest and with Finns at Little Finland; eating pasties from Joe's Pasties in Ironwood, Michigan--and so much more. We will be on the road from July 29 through August 3. If you would like to follow the journey on our blog, just click on http://wtlcteacherstour.wordpress.com/the-state-of-superior-2012/
by R. Olson
Tuesday, July 31, 2012
The New Yorker: "Once Upon a Time: The Lure of the Fairy Tale" 0 S. Bronner The New Yorker has taken notice of folklore, even mentioning the Journal of American Folklore as an outlet for this kind of study.http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics/books/2012/07/23/120723crbo_books_acocella
by S. Bronner
Monday, July 23, 2012
Prison Folklore Project: Humor in Prisons 0 L. Cashman Dear Prisoner Advocacy, Folklore, and Literary Groups,I am launching a folklore project about humor from the prison population, www.prisonfolk.com, and your support is needed. The project will collect, edit, and publish, on the web and in other media, a collection of oral histories and writings, including jokes, anecdotes, stories, tall tales, and other forms of humor from the criminal justice population in the United States. The goal is to help humanize civil society's relationship to the incarcerated and, in the process, to raise awareness about the many criminal justice issues affecting our society. Any and all proceeds resulting from this project will be donated to support a nonprofit and secular prisoner advocacy effort of some kind.I cannot think of a better campaign to humanize the relationship between the incarcerated and civilian populations in our country. Ethically speaking, it would also take the measure of our society. (How much does it weigh? Heavy. Earlier this week I participated in a letter writing event for prisoners. I wrote three letters, sharing anecdotes with the prisoners in each, and thought, really the best thing would be to reverse the communication, from the prison to the public, and make the material widely available.)In theory this would be carried out with the support of a coalition of prisoner advocacy, legal, folklore, literary, and other organizations.Please share this e-mail and the link to the website as widely as possible. At the moment the plan is to simply begin building relationships between interested parties, while giving people an idea of the project's aim and feasibility. With the Internet, sharing and publishing all forms of media is the simplest thing.Even a small volume of humor writing from prisoners, or a handful of videos of prisoners telling anecdotes, would make a meaningful contribution to the criminal justice discourse in this country.Sincerely,Alejandro Ventura2724 St. Paul St.Baltimore, MD 21218(202) 436 9803
by L. Cashman
Monday, July 16, 2012
Qualia Encyclopedia of Gay Folklife: all the way to M 1 L. Cashman Congratulations, Qualia Folk!  I browsed a couple of articles today and am mightily impressed.  I could easily browse all day.... Note that the direct link from the AFSNet forum entry does not work for some reason, but if you simply type http://www.qualiafolk.com/ into your browser it does work.  Cheers,Moira
by M. Marsh
Monday, July 09, 2012
Sutton-Smith's "The Folkstories of Children" to be Released in Paperback 0 R. Vanscoyoc What prompts children to tell stories? What does the word "story" mean to a child at two or five years of age? The Folkstories of Children, first published in 1981, features nearly five hundred stories that were volunteered by fifty children between the ages of two and ten and transcribed word for word. The stories are organized chronologically by the age of the teller, revealing the progression of verbal competence and the gradual emergence of staging and plot organization. Many stories told by two-year-olds, for example, have only beginnings with no middle or end; the "narrative" is held together by rhyme or alliteration. After the age of three or four, the same children tell stories that feature a central character and a narrative arc. The stories also exhibit each child's growing awareness and management of his or her environment and life concerns. Some children see their stories as dialogues between teller and audience, others as monologues expressing concerns about fate and the forces of good and evil.Brian Sutton-Smith discusses the possible origins of the stories themselves: folktales, parent and teacher reading, media, required writing of stories in school, dreams, and play. The notes to each chapter draw on this context as well as folktale analysis and child development theory to consider why and how the stories take their particular forms. The Folkstories of Children provides valuable evidence and insight into the ways children actively and inventively engage language as they grow.Brian Sutton-Smith, Professor of Education, Emeritus, at the University of Pennsylvania, is the author of some fifty books and hundreds of journal articles. In 1995 he received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Folklore Society. Please visit the Penn Press website for book excerpts and ordering information.
by R. Vanscoyoc
Monday, July 09, 2012
Audio Interview with Andy Statman, 2012 National Heritage Fellow 0 L. Cashman A pod-cast feature on 2012 NEA National Heritage Fellow Andy Statman is now posted on the NEA web-site:Andy StatmanKlezmer Clarinetist, Mandolin-player, Composer, 2012 National Heritage Fellow In the first of two-part interview, musical wonder Andy Statman talks about his early musical career, including the importance of bluegrass for a boy born in Brooklyn. http://www.arts.gov/podweb/podCMS/podlist.php
by L. Cashman
Monday, June 25, 2012
"The Beautiful Music All Around Us" by Stephen Wade 0 R. Vanscoyoc This fall, the University of Illinois Press will release Stephen Wade's new book, The Beautiful Music All Around Us: Field Recordings and the American Experience. To watch an interview in which Stephen discusses the book, click here. To visit the Press's website, please click here.
by R. Vanscoyoc
Tuesday, June 19, 2012
MSU Museum Launches "Great Folks" Blog on Michigan Traditional Arts 0 R. Vanscoyoc Michigan State University Museum has launched "GREAT FOLKS!" - a new blog dedicated to expanding the community of tradition bearers and those who want to learn more about the music, stories, dance, foodways, art, and cultural heritage of Michigan and beyond. A team of bloggers - including Bob Blackman, Pat Power, Lora Helou, Beth Donaldson, Kurt Dewhurst, and myself - are committed to sharing news and information about:* Great Lakes Folk Festival* Quilt Index* Michigan Barn and Farmstead Survey* Michigan Stained Glass Census* Michigan Quilt Project* Michigan Heritage Awards* Michigan Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Program* Michigan traditional artists* other traditional arts activities and resources of the MSU Museum and other organizations around the state* and occasional reports on the work of our colleagues at the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage, the American Folklore Society, the American Folklife Center, and public sector folklore programs across the U.S..The blog is sponsored by the Michigan State University Museum's Michigan Traditional Arts Program, a partnership with the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs.Go to http://gr8tfolks.blogspot.com/ and then sign up to follow us by email and/or to post comments.Then, please send this email message to your circle of friends who also are interested in this important part of our country's expressive cultural heritage!
by R. Vanscoyoc
Monday, June 18, 2012
Washington Post Article on Singing and Praying Bands 0 R. Vanscoyoc This Washington Post article on singing and praying bands reflects on the "ethical tightrope walk of supporting fragile traditions by sharing them with the greater public" in discussing the relationship between folklorists/ethnomusicologist Clifford Murphy and the singing and praying bands with whom he works. To read the full piece, please click on the following link: http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/singing-and-praying-bands-take-musical-ministry-to-the-masses/2012/06/14/gJQAOHwddV_story.html.
by R. Vanscoyoc
Monday, June 18, 2012
Traditional Arts Indiana Webinar Recording: Social Neworking for Artists.. 0 R. Vanscoyoc On April 5th, 2012, Traditional Arts Indiana held a webinar about "Social Networking for Artists and Performers." The webinar is now available as a video recording at http://www.traditionalartsindiana.org/?p=3428. TIA will be holding another webinar on "Wordpress for Traditional Musicians and Folk Artists" at 4PM on Thursday, June 14th, 2012. To participate in the webinar, please visit the TIA website by clicking here.
by R. Vanscoyoc
Thursday, June 14, 2012
NY TImes Recognizes Folklore Connection in "Beasts of the Southern Wild" 0 R. Vanscoyoc To read the New York Times' piece about director Benh Zeitlin's new feature film Beasts of the Southern Wild, follow this link: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/10/movies/the-making-of-beasts-of-the-southern-wild.html?pagewanted=all.
by R. Vanscoyoc
Wednesday, June 13, 2012


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American Folklore Society
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