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'Unesco-cide': Does World Heritage Status Do Cities More Harm than Good? 0 R. Rini Larson   "The gambling-ridden clan jetties of Malaysia’s George Town were saved from ruin by the award of Unesco world heritage status, but their new fame left locals overwhelmed by a tide of invasive tourism. Can we ever get the balance right?" To continue reading, visit the full article on The Guardian's website. Barron, Laignee. "'Unesco-cide': Does World Heritage Status Do Cities More Harm than Good?" The Guardian (August 30, 2017). https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2017/aug/30/unescocide-world-heritage-status-hurt-help-tourism
by R. Rini Larson
Tuesday, September 5, 2017
Find Podcasts About Folklore 0 R. Rini Larson   Looking for a new podcast about folklore?  Try one of these!   Amplify: Oral History Podcast Network (Kate Brenner) http://www.amplifyvoices.org/ Chasing Foxfire (Cory Hutcheson) https://chasingfoxfire.com/ Encounters (Eleanor Hasken & Jessie Fivecoate) https://encounterscast.com/encounters/ Lore (Aaron Mahnke) http://www.lorepodcast.com Love Your Story (Lori J. Lee) http://www.loveyourstorypodcast.com Myths and Legends (Jason Weiser) https://www.mythpodcast.com The Folklore Podcast (Mark Norman) http://www.thefolklorepodcast.com/ Find a full list of podcasts and blogs on this page.
by R. Rini Larson
Thursday, August 31, 2017
Windbigler Takes Helm of Western Folklife Center 0 R. Rini Larson   "Newly appointed Western Folklife Center Executive Director Kristin Windbigler has been attracted to cowboy culture since she was young. Windbigler recently moved to Elko but considers herself a native of cowboy culture, as she grew up in a small logging town in northern California and remembers hearing stories from her great-grandfather." To continue reading, visit the full article on the Elko Daily Free Press website.  Grayson, Hasani. "Windbigler Takes Helm of Western Folklife Center." Elko Daily Free Press (August 9, 2017). http://elkodaily.com/news/local/windbigler-takes-helm-of-western-folklife-center/article_d0728c31-5691-582c-b5a7-0e13d47bb19d.html
by R. Rini Larson
Friday, August 18, 2017
Praksis Announces New Issue Co-Edited by AFS Member Yücel Demirer 0 R. Rini Larson   AFS member Yücel Demirer has co-edited a special issue of the Turkish journal Praksis on Symbolic Politics (42, 2017). With articles by some of his students, the issue considers symbolic contestation in public space, popular culture, state ceremony, academia, and protest performance in contemporary Turkey. Until September 2016, Demirer was Associate Professor of Political Science at Kocaeli University, where he introduced folkloristic and ethnographic approaches to the study of lived politics. English-language abstracts for the issue may be found at http://www.praksis.org/en/sayilar-en/issue-42-symbolic-politics/.   For more information about the journal, visit the Praksis website.
by R. Rini Larson
Tuesday, August 15, 2017
Eat Your Words: How We Talk About 'Ethnic' Food Matters, and Here's Why 0 R. Rini Larson   "The 'best cheap eats in your city.' This time of year, it feels like every food publication—this one included—puts out at least one of these curated lists. Though they may seem harmless, these roundups featuring what tends to be meals fit for a hangover ringing in at less than ten dollars are also fertile ground for problematic discourse." To continue reading, visit the full article on the Tasting Table website.  Hutcherson, Aaron. "Eat Your Words: How We Talk About Ethnic Food Matters, and Here's Why." Tasting Table (August 10, 2017). https://www.tastingtable.com/culture/national/ethnic-cuisine-food-media?utm_medium=email&utm_source=TT&utm_campaign=Daily&utm_content=Editorial 
by R. Rini Larson
Monday, August 14, 2017
AFS President-Elect Dorothy Noyes Joined in Allegra Lab Roundtable 0 J. Fivecoate Dorry Noyes participated in an Allegra Lab virtual roundtable, “'Collaborative Dilemmas' in the Age of Uncertainty,” considering how young researchers reconcile scholarly and policy agendas in collaborative projects. The roundtable participants are especially interested in how such projects influence the career development of precarious junior scholars.  For more information, visit http://allegralaboratory.net/roundtable-comment-dorothy-noyes-collaborativedilemmas/.
by J. Fivecoate
Wednesday, July 19, 2017
"Quilts of Southwest China" Exhibit Mentioned in Pasatiempo 0 J. Fivecoate "Quilts of Southwest China, opening at the Museum of International Folk Art on Sunday, July 9, is the culmination of a three-year collaboration between three museums in the United States and three in China, spearheaded by the American and Chinese folklore societies and funded by the Henry Luce Foundation. The show is geared toward introducing Chinese quilting traditions, which have not been much exhibited in museums, to a larger audience. Many quilts are from the collection at the Michigan State University Museum, acquired from the import company Textile Treasures, whose owner, Pam Najdowski, lives in Santa Fe and runs The Traveler’s Market at the DeVargas Center. Other pieces come from the Chinese museums and some are from MoIFA’s collection. Lijun Zhang, research curator at the Guangxi Museum of Nationalities, and Marsha MacDowell, curator and director of the Michigan State University Museum, edited the Quilts of Southwest China exhibit catalog, in which they explain that ethnic community members consider clothing a public marker of cultural identity. As textiles like bedcovers are replaced with commercially manufactured goods — and women are more likely to make small, lovingly embellished baby carriers for friends and family than to engage in the much more time-consuming work of creating full-size covers — the knowledge and skills needed to make them are also being lost. “International, national, and regional agencies are beginning to promote intangible cultural heritage and scholars, cultural practitioners, and local artists are beginning to document the art of quiltmaking. It is hoped that strategies will be developed to preserve the remaining historical textiles and the knowledge and skills of artists so that the tradition of making them can continue,” they write. Carrie Hertz, curator of textiles and costume at MoIFA, traveled to China as part of the cultural exchange. She said that about 90 percent of the Chinese population is of the Han ethnicity, and the remaining 10 percent fall into 55 other recognized minority groups as established by the government in the middle part of the 20th century — but in reality, there are many more groups. “As the Communists were making their bid for power, they promised these ethnic groups equal representation in government, when before this time, such diversity was discouraged,” she said. “But no one knew how many ethnic groups there were, so what happened was that they started this major survey project, which meant sending researchers out into the field to figure out how to combine them.” Ethnic groups and subgroups were determined in large part by external observations of how they dressed, which led to a complicated disconnect between how the government and majority of Chinese refer to these groups and how they talk about or consider themselves. “For instance, one of the largest ethnic minority groups is Miao, but that’s made up of hundreds of subgroups, some of whom do not consider themselves Miao.” To read the full article, visit http://www.santafenewmexican.com/pasatiempo/art/museum_shows/fabric-of-life-quilts-of-southwest-china/article_ab60c7f7-10b7-5f17-8420-f364b4249b7f.html?utm_content=buffer2fab7&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer."
by J. Fivecoate
Wednesday, July 19, 2017
"The Unfinished Work of Alan Lomax’s Global Jukebox" 0 J. Fivecoate "Lomax saw archives as tools to ward off cultural erasure. He meant to help populations maintain and expand on their traditions. At a time of high modernism, that meant capturing traditions on tape and establishing their own standard repertories. But to uphold and honor any population in the present day, it’s crucial to avoid freezing it in place. (Even the Delta blues, which first inspired Lomax to make folk music his career, was an evolving form that had existed for only a few decades.) With the Global Jukebox, ACE [Association for Cultural Equity] can actually foster a continuing conversation. The quintessential image of Lomax is one of a smiling man holding a microphone up to a singer. The image of today’s folkloric inquiry might be one of the artist recording herself while she repurposes the tools of past generations, using new instruments and technologies. In the 1960s and ’70s, Lomax worked on various projects to ensure that rural communities would remain aware of their own traditions and the social contracts they reflected. He advocated for region-specific public TV programs as a way to make sure local communities “grow from their own roots,” as he once wrote. He pushed Unesco — and then Sony — to put recording equipment into the hands of artists in small communities across the world. With ACE, Lomax said his main purpose was to “repatriate” the audio and video materials he had captured across the globe — placing them back within their places of origin and incorporating them into local education initiatives. He also hoped to help people in those areas continue documenting themselves." To read the full article, visit https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/11/arts/music/alan-lomax-global-jukebox-digital-archive.html?smprod=nytcore-ipad&smid=nytcore-ipad-share. 
by J. Fivecoate
Wednesday, July 19, 2017
The American Folklife Center's Occupational Folklife Project Now Online 0 J. Fivecoate The American Folklife Center is pleased to announce that the first installment of its on-going Occupational Folklife Project (OFP) is now online!  To date, and with help of colleagues throughout the country, the AFC has amassed a collection of more than 600 interviews with contemporary American workers in more than 40 trades and occupations. Funded in part by Archie Green Fellowships, the born-digital collecting project enables researchers to access actual field tapes, field notes, and images outside the AFC Reading Room.  OFP begins with the posting of 50+ interviews from the "Working the Port of Houston" collection. Directed by Pat Jasper and her colleagues at the Houston Arts Alliance during 2011-2012, and with the support of an Archie Green Fellowship, "Working the Port" documents the work experiences of river pilots, marine firefighters, longshoremen, tugboat operators, port engineers, union organizers, owners of port-related business, and other workers who keep one of American's busiest ports humming. Other projects expected to be available online before the year’s end include interviews with hairdressers and beauty-shop owners, big-top and circus workers, home health care workers in Oregon, iron workers in the Upper Midwest, and “ranger lore” collected from workers in the National Park Service. To access the OFP website and access the interviews, visit: https://loc.gov/collections/occupational-folklife-project/about-this-collection/.   For the official Library of Congress Press Release, visit: https://www.loc.gov/item/prn-17-100/.  For the Folklife Today blog giving an overview of the OFP and the Archie Green Fellowship program, visit: http://blogs.loc.gov/folklife/.  For more information about OFP and AGFs, contact AFC Senior Folklife Specialist Nancy Groce at ngro@loc.gov.
by J. Fivecoate
Wednesday, July 19, 2017
Tim Thurston Discusses Job Market Challenges on Podcast 0 J. Fivecoate Folklorist Tim Thurston discusses the job market challenges of early career researchers on Exploration Through Education's podcast “Coffee and Cocktails”: https://soundcloud.com/user-579024727/coffee-and-cocktails-episode-1-ecrs-and-the-job-market. 
by J. Fivecoate
Wednesday, July 12, 2017
"Endowed Chair in Public Folklore at UA to Honor Jim Griffith’s Legacy" 0 J. Fivecoate  "The University of Arizona has named one of its endowed professorships for a folklorist who roamed the Sonoran desert in search of beauty hidden in plain view for 40 years and shared that beauty with everyone. The Jim Griffith Public Folklore Chair will serve to honor the work and legacy of “Big Jim” Griffith with a permanent faculty position in the Southwest Center dedicated to the study of folklore, John Paul Jones III, Dean of the UA’s College of Social and Behavioral Sciences. Southwest Folklife Alliance Executive Director Maribel Alvarez is the first scholar to hold the chair. A permanent position is significant, she said, because “it means the University recognizes the importance of a discipline that focused on those things that are usually overlooked.” The chair ensures the longevity of that commitment. “When Jim’s not here and when I’m not here, there will still be someone upholding that tradition and commitment,” Alvarez said. When Jim Griffith took his first job at the University as director of the newly formed Southwest Folklore Center in 1979, his passion for the traditional arts of the region had already yielded some significant results. Five years earlier, Jim, his wife Loma, and Mary Sowls of the Cultural Exchange Council had conceived, planned, and presented the first Tucson Meet Yourself Folklife Festival. Now in its 45th year, the festival is one of Tucson’s largest and recognized nationally not only for its diverse participants who share expressions of culture but also for its equally diverse audience. Public folklorists view themselves as serving the communities they study and the general public, as well as their academic discipline. Jim’s work on the study and celebration of Southwestern culture and folklore “one of this university’s most successful examples of community engagement,” Jones said."   To read the full article, visit https://www.southwestfolklife.org/endowed-chair-public-folklore-ua-honor-jim-griffiths-legacy/.   
by J. Fivecoate
Friday, June 16, 2017
Jeana Jorgensen and the ATU Index Featured in Atlas Obscura Article 0 J. Fivecoate By Cara Giaimo   "Pick a number, any number, and I’ll tell you a story. Fifty-nine? Hunker down for “Fox and the Sour Grapes.” Eleven hundred fifty-one? Good choice—that’s “The Ogre Overawed by Displaying Objects.” Five hundred? That’s “Guessing the Helper’s Name,” or, as you might know it better, “Rumpelstiltskin.” Such are the joys of the Aarne-Thompson Uther Tale Type Index, a massive categorization system that, in the service of scholarship, has attempted to squeeze every Indo-European folktale and fable into a salient category, complete with a corresponding number and pithy name. “Anytime I start doing any fairytale or folk narrative research, one of the first things I do is go to the Index,” says Jeana Jorgensen, a lecturer at the University of California, Berkeley’s folklore program. “It’s indispensable.” To read the full article, visit http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/aarne-thompson-uther-tale-type-index-fables-fairy-tales.   
by J. Fivecoate
Thursday, June 15, 2017
"Do Folklore and Security Studies Mix? Mershon Affiliate Says Yes" 0 J. Fivecoate "Mershon affiliate Dorothy Noyes, professor of English and comparative studies, has published a new book: Sustaining Interdisciplinary Collaboration: A Guide for the Academy (University of Illinois Press, 2017), co-authored with Regina Bendix and Kilian Bizer. Sustaining Interdisciplinary Collaboration shows newcomers and veteran researchers how to craft associations that will lead to rich mutual learning under inevitably tricky conditions. Strikingly candid and always grounded, the authors draw a wealth of profound, practical lessons from an in-depth case study of a multiyear funded project on cultural property. Examining the social dynamics of collaboration, they show readers how to anticipate sources of conflict, nurture trust, and jump-start thinking across disciplines. Researchers and institutions alike will learn to plan for each phase of a project life cycle, capturing insights and shepherding involvement along the way. Because much of Noyes’s contribution to the book draws heavily from her work at the Mershon Center, we asked her about her long experience as a folklorist collaborating with scholars in international relations and security studies." To read the full article, visit https://mershoncenter.osu.edu/news/mershon-news/do-folklore-and-security-studies-mix-mershon-affiliate-says-yes.html. 
by J. Fivecoate
Tuesday, May 30, 2017
The Northwest Folklife Festival Impacts the Cultures That Make It Possible 0 J. Fivecoate By Northwest Folklife “Every Memorial Day weekend, Folklife invites more than 5,000 artists to perform for and present their work to the 250,000 attendees that come to Seattle Center for the festival, which is celebrating its 46th anniversary this year. While the programming greatly benefits the onlookers by exposing them to traditions of cultures from throughout the Puget Sound region, the cultural participants benefit as well, by way of empowerment, connection, and recognition. All three of these elements were at play last year when Mix took part in Folklife’s Circle of Indigenous Peoples as a representative of the Métis. At the center of the event is a pow wow, a tradition of the plains Indians that has been adopted by a great number of North American tribes. No single tribe has prominence in the festivities, but last year Mix was able to carve out a part of the programming to introduce festival crowds to the Métis, who are the product of the long intermingling of French and First Nations people in the American and Canadian West. “We brought a Métis chief down,” he says. “We did an honoring ceremony and he addressed the people and spoke about the Métis culture.” In the year since, says Mix, his fractured community is beginning to come together and will again be present at this year’s Folklife, where they will have a booth for attendees to learn about the culture and traditions of his people. The case of the Métis is unique, but Mix, who now sits on the council of the Circle of Indigenous Peoples, says that people from other tribes benefit from the inclusive nature of the event as well. “You have people who are living in Puget Sound, but their homelands might be back in South Dakota,” Mix says. “Folklife gives them the chance, through the Circle of Indigenous Peoples, to have an event that caters to all indigenous groups.” To read the full article, visit http://www.seattleweekly.com/marketplace/how-northwest-folklife-festival-impacts-the-cultures-that-make-it-possible/. 
by J. Fivecoate
Friday, May 26, 2017
"Untangling Academic Publishing" 0 J. Fivecoate By Aileen Fyfe, Kelly Coate, Stephen Curry, Stuart Lawson, Noah Moxham, and Camilla Mørk Røstvik "In 2013, the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council funded a 4-year project on the editorial and commercial history of the world’s oldest-surviving scholarly journal (‘Publishing the Philosophical Transactions: a social, cultural and economic history of a learned journal, 1665-2015’, AH/K001841). The project is led by Dr Aileen Fyfe at the University of St Andrews in partnership with the Royal Society. The project team convened a workshop at the Royal Society, 22 April 2016, on ‘The Politics of Academic Publishing, 1950-2016’. This briefing paper is informed by the contributions of those who attended that day, and we thank them for their insights. The authors of this briefing paper are a sub-group of those who attended the April 2016 workshop. This report is based upon the primary (historical) research of the Philosophical Transactions project team, combined with a literature review, and the expertise of the other authors (principally in higher education research, and in scholarly communication)." To read the full report, visit https://zenodo.org/record/546100#.WShGAlPyts2. 
by J. Fivecoate
Friday, May 26, 2017
“Commentaries on Migration and Borders for Mexico and the U.S." 0 J. Fivecoate Attempts by the new Administration in Washington to restrict immigration and, more recently, to enforce the removal of some categories of undocumented workers has increased the professional and public interest in immigration in the U.S. and abroad. The Society for Applied Anthropology (SfAA) calls your attention to a special issue of our publication, Practicing Anthropology, which includes recent information on several aspects of this topic: Practicing Anthropology, Vol. 38, No. 1, Winter, 2016 “Commentaries on Migration and Borders for Mexico and the U.S.” Co-editors: Profs. Judith Freidenberg and Jorge Durand SfAA has opened access to this issue, without subscription or cost, in order to engage the broader community around contemporary immigration issues. You may access the special issue on immigration at: http://sfaajournals.net/toc/praa/38/1.  SfAA encourages you as well to access podcasted papers which were presented at a recent conference in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The title of the session is “How We Think, Work, and Write about Migration” and may be accessed at: http://sfaa.net/podcast/index.php/podcasts/2017/how-we-think-work-and-write-about-migration/. 
by J. Fivecoate
Wednesday, May 10, 2017
Craft Emergency Relief Fund Program Guidelines 0 J. Fivecoate CERF+’s Craft Emergency Relief Fund program has emergency grants and no-interest loans available to artists working in craft disciplines who have experienced a recent, serious emergency such as illness, injury, fire, theft, or natural disaster. The maximum potential grant for established artists is $6,000, and no-interest emergency recovery loans range from $500 to $9,000. The maximum potential grant for emerging artists is $3,500. For more information, visit https://cerfplus.org/.   
by J. Fivecoate
Thursday, April 20, 2017
The Global Jukebox 0 J. Fivecoate The Global Jukebox explores connections between families of expressive style. One can travel the world of song, dance and language through the Wheel Chart and the Map. Thousands of examples of the world’s music, dance and other expressive behavior will now become available. The Global Jukebox is presented as a free, non-commercial, educational place for everybody, students, educators, scholars, scientists, musicians, dancers, linguists, artists and music fans to explore expressive patterns in their cultural-geographic and diasporic settings and alongside other people’s. By inviting familiarity with many kinds of vocalizing, musicking, moving, and talking, we hope to advance cultural equity and to reconnect people and communities with their creative heritage. There are many ways to explore and listen, experimentally or systematically, with searches or randomly. Visitor’s may read the description of each selection and view the codings, or learn to make codings themselves. Journeys by area specialists and tradition bearers will take visitors into the heart of particular traditions and cultures, and certified Lesson Plans for K through 12 offer historical, ethnographic and educational ways into musical and dance worlds. We hope the Jukebox will become an interactive center for discovering, exploring and researching expressive culture, with links to past and present work in the field, the ability to enlarge the samples of song, dance, and speech, and guidelines for coding each dataset. The site will host teaching systems for both Choreometrics and Cantometrics, and links to information on these projects. With the guidance of experienced music and movement analysts, these resources can enable committed students to learn these systems of analysis at to an extent that suits their needs. We work with curriculum consultants to develop K-12 curricula and college course material. A more profound understanding of expressive culture will help to produce truly global citizens. Descriptive Data The identifying and descriptive data for each song has taken over three years and the work of several individuals to compile, and will remain a work in progress for some time. Culture latitude and longitude come from Glottocode. Local latitudes/longitudes place familiar villages and localities of origin of the material; these are sometimes omitted to approximate due to the scant documentation or due to the movement or disappearance of populations. Ideally, song “titles” or first lines are given in their native languages, but we are not always able to locate this information in the collectors’ notes or in other sources; in such cases we have used English translations or generic descriptive titles. The culture descriptions will take additional months to enter. There are other lacunae, but we hope that our public will be patient. We will gladly receive any corrections and missing information from our visitors or the contributors and performers of the songs here: contact@theglobaljukebox.org. First Americans, Aboriginal Australians and members of other indigenous and ethnic communities should be aware that that this website may contain images, voices or names of deceased persons in audio recordings, film, or in print. Descriptive data and analyses on this site may contain terms reflecting authors’ views or the period in which the documentation was gathered, and may not be considered correct or appropriate today. This material may not reflect current understanding or the views of the Association for Cultural Equity, but is provided for scientific and historical accuracy. The Legacy of an Historic Project The Global Jukebox makes available to the general public, scholars and scientists all of the data and many of the analyses of the research into the expressive arts carried out under the direction of Alan Lomax and the anthropologist Conrad Arensberg from 1960 to 1995 at Columbia University and Hunter College/CUNY. It contains all of the coded data and analyses of Cantometrics, Choreometrics, Parlametrics, Phonotactics, Minutage, Thematic Analysis, Instruments and Orchestras, and Socio-Cultural Factors. These are comparative studies of expressive style in relation to culture undertaken by Lomax with Arensberg, Victor Grauer, Irmgard Bartenieff, Forrestine Paulay, Norman Markel, Edwin Erickson, Roswell Rudd, Andrew Kaye, Norman Berkowitz, Michael Del Rio and others. It was an exciting project that generated considerable controversy, and returned a mother load of intriguing results. We have begun testing these and when we release the data, we hope that others will follow suite. Our intention is twofold: to make the data available to science, and through the experience of the Global Jukebox, make the media and database available to everyone. It will be possible to add new samples. If visitors want to create their own libraries of songs, metadata, codings, and keep their own notes on the site, we can make this possible. We will add analytic tools so that visitors may investigate and experiment on their own. Patterns graphs and maps the occurrence of musical traits, as requested by the user. Similarities compare all items in a data set to determine which are most similar in which parameters. Correlations will calculate correspondences between social factors and performance data, or between one set of performance data and another. We are performing new analyses of the data. They will be shared, visualized and explained on the Jukebox. The comparative method emphasized here offers but one, albeit fruitful, avenue to understanding expressive systems. It is complementary to other ethnographic and historical approaches rich in contextual detail and analytic refinement. When used together these approaches are powerful and illuminating. To view the Global Jukebox and to find out more, visit http://theglobaljukebox.org/. 
by J. Fivecoate
Thursday, April 20, 2017
"Where do Your NEA Dollars Really Go?" 0 J. Fivecoate “ANDREWS, Ind. — Viki Graber’s sneakers slosh in the wet grass as she twists two willow branches to form an arch. This 30-foot-long tunnel, an installation and playful passageway being built in Salamonie State Park, is the National Endowment for the Arts at work in Mike Pence country. And it’s anything but an easy gig for Graber, 53, a basket weaver. She sleeps in an unheated cabin nearby — home is 90 minutes north — as she creates her work. For this, she will get $3,000. Two hours south, in Indianapolis, NEA money is helping Big Car revive a neighborhood. The nonprofit group is converting 10 bungalows and a shuttered church — all abandoned in recent years — into artist housing. With the help of a $10,000 NEA grant, Big Car has curated a sound exhibition that’s installed in almost a dozen spaces, including a library, bookstore and botanical garden. Once blighted and barely alive, Cruft Street now thumps with activity... “We’re going into communities where there is so little access to the arts,” says Jon Kay, the director of Traditional Arts Indiana, which helped coordinate the NEA funding of Graber’s project. “If we lose NEA support, these traditions will be gone.” The NEA’s budget is modest but designed to reach out to people outside big cities. The agency gives nearly $50 million of its $150 million annual budget to state arts councils so they can, in turn, distribute money to local programs and artists. Those contributions come with a built-in multiplier, as the NEA requires arts councils to match the federal government’s contributions. In addition, in fiscal 2015, the NEA awarded more than 300 grants totaling $7.7 million for projects in rural areas.” To read the full article, visit https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/not-just-welfare-for-elites-a-36-hour-tour-through-indiana-shows-where-your-nea-dollars-really-go/2017/04/13/62fc0b0a-1ee8-11e7-a0a7-8b2a45e3dc84_story.html?utm_term=.72b67adbcc48.   
by J. Fivecoate
Thursday, April 20, 2017
Legend Database Recipient of 2017 Digging into Data Award 0 J. Fivecoate The Intelligent Search Engine for Belief Legends (ISEBEL) provides intelligent search and analysis across three of the world’s largest machine actionable folklore collections (Dutch Folktale Database-Meertens Instituut, Amsterdam, the Danish Folktale Database-UCLA, and the Mecklenburger Folklore Database-WossiDiA, Rostock) presenting the opportunity for large scale data-driven research into traditional folk expressive culture. By facilitating search, discovery and analysis across all three collections, ISEBEL provides researchers an unprecedented opportunity to discover patterns both within and across the target corpora. The proposed research, focusing on storytellers, legends and the dispersion of beliefs in magic, witchcraft, hauntings and supernatural beings seeks to reveal what ordinary people believed, and how storytelling traditions and story repertoires differed in and across these three areas. Principal Investigators Theo Meder, Meertens Instituut, Netherlands, NWO Holger Meyer, University of Rostock, Germany, DFG Christoph Schmitt, University of Rostock, Germany, DFG Tim Tangherlini, University of California, Los Angeles, United States, NEH For more information, visit https://diggingintodata.org/awards/2016.   
by J. Fivecoate
Friday, April 14, 2017

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