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Cultural Sustainability
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Looking for two presenters for a panel on Cultural Sustainability, AFS 2012 0 M. Hale We’re interested in putting together a panel that will center around cultural sustainability (with cultural sustainability being broadly interpreted) for AFS 2012.Here is what we would like our papers to focus on… Suzanne Barber, PhD student, Indiana UniversityI will focus on the discourse surrounding cultural sustainability of animal husbandry practices, paying particular attention to biopolitics and narrative construction as it pertains to dog fancy, emerging sporting venues, and traditional dog/human working relations.Matthew Hale, PhD student, Indiana UniversitySteampunk is a sub-genre of science fiction literature that centers around alternate, counterfactual, or speculative histories, in essence, re-imaginings of the past that explore  what might have happened had history went differently. I will argue that steampunks engage with the past and history as a means to (1) critique the past itself, (2) to critique a troubled and unsustainable present in relation to an equally difficult and unsustainable past, and (3) to imagine and carve into existence a more aesthetic, thoughtful, sustainable, and human future. Furthermore, I will suggest that steampunk is a marker of atemporality, a cultural movement that is a reaction to and against modernism, postmodernism, and hypermodernism, that refines progress and critique’s the unsustainable nature of late consumer capitalism.   Please contact us at matthew.hale0009@gmail.com if you’re interested.
by M. Hale
Tuesday, January 10, 2012
Best Practices and Community Sustainability Retreat 0 M. Luster American Folklore Society Best Practices funds have been awarded to support a retreat to discuss and develop community-based folklife practices in light of cultural sustainability. The retreat will be held May 20-22, 2011 at the Meadowcreek Center, a sustainable education center created by David W. Orr in Fox, Arkansas. Growing out of discussions and presentations at the 2009 and 2010 AFS meetings as well as the work of colleagues such as Jeff Titon and Rory Turner, an expanding discussion group has formed communicating via e-mail, the AFS cultural sustainability discussion forum, and the Community-Based Folklore group on Facebook. For the retreat, we will meet to discuss how folklorists and our colleagues and collaborators in other fields might learn from each other to better help communities and their traditions endure by maintaining and extending traditional knowledge and practices in the face of economic and political forces that dismantle them. We will also discuss ways to use and support our skills as community members and as cultural workers in the face of those same pressures. A report will be produced at the end of the retreat summarizing the outcome of the discussions. For more information or to ask about attending contact Rachel Reynolds Luster (Luster@aol.com) or Mike Luster (mikeluster@gmail.com) or visit either the AFS or Facebook discussion sites. Best Practice funds will be used to cover facility and logistics costs and to assist, as much as possible, those without other travel support.
by M. Luster
Tuesday, February 22, 2011
Best Practices and Community Sustainability Retreat 0 M. Luster American Folklore Society Best Practices funds have been awarded to support a retreat to discuss and develop community-based folklife practices in light of cultural sustainability. The retreat will be held May 20-22, 2011 at the Meadowcreek Center, a sustainable education center created by David W. Orr in Fox, Arkansas. Growing out of discussions and presentations at the 2009 and 2010 AFS meetings as well as the work of colleagues such as Jeff Titon and Rory Turner, an expanding discussion group has formed communicating via e-mail, the AFS cultural sustainability discussion forum, and the Community-Based Folklore group on Facebook. For the retreat, we will meet to discuss how folklorists and our colleagues and collaborators in other fields might learn from each other to better help communities and their traditions endure by maintaining and extending traditional knowledge and practices in the face of economic and political forces that dismantle them. We will also discuss ways to use and support our skills as community members and as cultural workers in the face of those same pressures. A report will be produced at the end of the retreat summarizing the outcome of the discussions. For more information or to ask about attending contact Rachel Reynolds Luster (Luster@aol.com) or Mike Luster (mikeluster@gmail.com) or visit either the AFS or Facebook discussion sites. Best Practice funds will be used to cover facility and logistics costs and to assist, as much as possible, those without other travel support.   Rachel Reynolds Luster Mike Luster
by M. Luster
Tuesday, February 22, 2011
Hey look at this! 22 M. Luster http://sustainablemusic.blogspot.com/2010/11/natures-economy-at-ethnomusicology.html
by M. Luster
Tuesday, November 16, 2010
From the Cultural Sustainability Discussion Group..... 1 M. Luster Recently Updated Profiles Patricia Atkinson, Lorraine W. Cashman, Amy Kitchener, Kristen A. Bradley-Shurtz, Joey Brackner, Molly M. Bolick, Nelda R. Ault, Mike Luster, Jeff T. Titon, John Wolford Write on the wall... Jeff T. Titon wrote on the Discussion Group: Cultural Sustainability wall: In my reading since returning from Nashville and giving my AFS paper on "Nature's economy" as a way of reconciling sustainability discourses coming from ecology and economics, I've been exploring the cultures of natural history (that is, the history of the field we call natural history). Prior to this reading I'd assumed Foucault's idea of a great epistemological shift ca. 1800 in Western thought about Nature was correct, but now I'm questioning it. (Foucault writes about natural history and this shift in THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF KNOWLEDGE.) I will be posting some of this to my blog on music and sustainability. Incidentally, the "curiosi" of 17th c. Europe who were interested in unusual objects of natural history were also interested in curious "popular antiquities" (i.e., folklore). Posted 11/2/2010
by M. Luster
Thursday, November 04, 2010
Events 2 M. Luster http://hoosierbiology.wordpress.com/2010/11/03/wendall-berry-lecture/
by M. Luster
Thursday, November 04, 2010
What is cultural Sustainability? 1 M. Luster http://blogs.goucher.edu/culturalsustainability/2010/10/29/arkansas-talk/
by M. Luster
Monday, November 01, 2010
Inspiration 0 M. Luster What ideas, works, practices from inside or ouside our field inspire us?
by M. Luster
Friday, October 29, 2010
Community-based folklife practice 0 M. Luster How can we use our work to strengthen communities?
by M. Luster
Friday, October 29, 2010
Blogs to watch 3 M. Luster http://meredith-martin.com/blog/
by M. Luster
Friday, October 29, 2010


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