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2011 Prize Recipients
AFS Prizes

AFS Kenneth Goldstein Award for Lifetime Academic Leadership

Barre Toelken, Utah State University, emeritus

Chicago Folklore Prize, for best scholarly monograph in folklore

Amira Mittermaier, University of Toronto, for the book Dreams That Matter: Egyptian Landscapes of the Imagination (University of California Press, 2011)

Benjamin A. Botkin Prize, for outstanding achievement in public folklore

Peggy A. Bulger, American Folklife Center

Amy Skillman, Independent Folklorist, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania

Zora Neale Hurston Prize, for the best student work in any medium on African or African Diaspora folklore

Vincent Joos, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, for the paper "The Natchez Fire: A Profile of African American Remembrance in a Small Mississippi Town”

Américo Paredes Prize, to recognize excellence in integrating scholarship and engagement with the people and communities one studies, or in teaching and encouraging scholars and practitioners to work in their own cultures or communities

Olga Nájera-Ramírez, University of California, Santa Cruz


AFS Section Prizes

The British Folk Studies Section awarded the William J. Thoms Folklore Prize for the best student submission dealing with the folklore of the British Isles and Ireland to:

Joy Fraser, Memorial University of Newfoundland, for the essay, "Sawney’s Kitchen Nightmare: Culinary Expressions of Scottophobia in Late-Eighteenth-Century English Culture”

The Children’s Folklore Section awarded the Aesop Prize, given each year to the best English-language book, fiction or nonfiction, for children and young adults about or incorporating folklore, to:

Trickster: Native American Tales, A Graphic Collection. Edited by Matt Dembicki. Golden, CO: Fulcrum Books, 2010.

The Children’s Folklore Section’s Aesop Accolade honorable mentions were awarded to:

Odetta: The Queen of Folk. By Stephen Alcorn and Samantha Thornhill. New York: Scholastic. 2010The Arabian Nights. By Wafa’ Tarnowska, Illustrated by Carole Hénaff. Cambridge, MA: Barefoot Books, 2010.

It’s Not About the Rose!
By Veronika Martenova Charles, Illustrated by David Parkins. Plattsburgh, NY: Tundra Books, 2010.

It’s Not About the Crumbs! By Veronika Martenova Charles, Illustrated by David Parkins. Plattsburgh, NY: Tundra Books, 2010.

It’s Not About the Pumpkin! By Veronika Martenova Charles, Illustrated by David Parkins. Plattsburgh, NY: Tundra Books, 2010.

It’s Not About the Hunter! By Veronika Martenova Charles, Illustrated by David Parkins. Plattsburgh, NY: Tundra Books, 2010.

It’s Not About the Apple! By Veronika Martenova Charles, Illustrated by David Parkins. Plattsburgh, NY: Tundra Books, 2010.

The Children’s Folklore Section awarded the William Wells Newell Prize for the best student essay on children’s folklore to:

Spencer Lincoln Green of Pennsylvania State University, Harrisburg, for the paper "Disastrous Alternatives: Boy Scout Disaster Stories and Legends and Imagining the Natural World"

Steven Stanzak of Indiana University for the paper "Manipulating Play Frames: The Yo Momma Joke Cycle on YouTube"

The Eastern Asia Folklore Section awarded the Jonathan T. Y. Yeh Award for Student Scholarship in Asian and Asian American Folklore to:

Yuanhao Zhao of The Ohio State University for the paper "In the Margins: Folk Belief, Huizus, and the 'Pork Thing' in China"

The Folk Belief and Religious Folklife Section awarded the Don Yoder Graduate Student Paper Prize to:

Charlotte-Rose Millar of the University of Melbourne for the paper "The Witch’s Familiar in Sixteenth-Century England”

The Folk Arts Section awarded the Warren E. Roberts Prize for the best undergraduate or graduate student paper on any aspect of folk art or material culture to:

Matthew Hale, Indiana University, for the essay "Shaping Theory, Bending Method, Tapping [New] Media: Ethnographic Craftsmanship and Responsive Design"

The Folklore and Education Section awarded the Robinson-Roeder-Ward Fellowship in memory of folklorists Beverly Robinson, Bea Roeder, and Vaughn Ward, individuals of vision, scholarship, and activism, who inspired a generation of folklorists working in K-12 education, to:

Heather Cunningham for her work as an educator to incorporate folklore in to her curriculum offered to students at City Charter High School in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

The Folklore and Education Section awarded the Dorothy Howard Folklore and Education Prize, which recognizes individuals and organizations whose work effectively encourages K-12 educators or students to use or study folklore and folkloristic approaches in all educational environments, to:

"Show Me Traditions: An Educator's Guide to Teaching Folk Arts and Folklife in Missouri Schools," written and developed by Susan Eleuterio in collaboration with staff and master artists of the Missouri Folk Arts Program.

The Foodways Section awarded the Sue Samuelson Foodways Student Essay Prize:

1st Place: Greg de St. Maurice, University of Pittsburgh, for the paper, "Edible Authenticities: Heirloom Vegetables and Culinary Heritage in Kyoto, Japan”

2nd Place: Rachel Reynolds Luster, Arkansas State University, for the paper, "Toward a Sustainable Culture: The Eddie Mae Herron Center, One Model"

There were 2 honorable mentions:

Jennifer Rachel Dutch, Penn State, for the paper, "Grandma’s Gone Global: Recipe Transmission from the Kitchenette to the Internet”

Clare Forstie, Northwestern University, for the paper "From Rosy to Regrettable: Mixed Nostalgia and the Meanings of Jell-O Salad"

The Jewish Folklore and Ethnology Section awarded the Raphael Patai Prize for outstanding student papers in Jewish folklore and ethnology to:

Magdalena Luszczynska, University College, London, for "Father-Son Relationships in Medieval Ashkenaz"

Amy Milligan, The Pennsylvania State University, Harrisburg, for "Wearing Many Hats: Head-Covering Practices of Orthodox Women"

The Public Programs Section awarded the Archie Green Public Folklore Advocacy Award for outstanding devotees, community members, advocates, and others who generally operate outside the professional field of folklore and who have made significant contributions to the preservation and encouragement of folk traditions in the United States through public oriented projects, programs and other innovative activities, to:

Patty Miller, Basque Museum and Cultural Center, Boise, Idaho

The Women’s Section awarded the Elli Köngäs-Maranda student prize for the best student paper or production on women's traditional, vernacular, and local culture and/or work on feminist theory and folklore to:

Fredericka Schmadel for "Magalena Hagelena: The Worldview of a Camp Song”

The Women’s Section awarded the Elli Köngäs-Maranda professional prize for outstanding work on women's traditional, vernacular, and local culture and/or work on feminist theory and folklore to:

Kimberly Lau, University of California, Santa Cruz, for the paper: "Body Language: Sisters in Shape, Women’s Fitness, and Feminist Identity Politics”

Deborah Kodish, Philadelphia Folklore Project, for the film "Eatala: A Life in Klezmer”



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American Folklore Society
Mershon Center, The Ohio State University, 1501 Neil Avenue, Columbus OH 43201-2602 USA
614/292-4715; fax: 614/292-2199; www.afsnet.org


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